Writing for Peace News, August 2012

Writing for Peace welcomes two new members to our Advisory Panel. Adriana Paramo is a cultural anthropologist and writer. Dr. Margaret Flowers is a physician and healthcare activist. Both have demonstrated a commitment to the practice of their arts that led to a greater social commitment and activism. Subscribe to our blog to receive posts from these and other inspirational Advisory Panel members.

Adriana Paramo, Writing for Peace AdviserAdriana Paramo, Author, Women’s Rights Activist

Adriana Paramo is a Colombian writer and cultural anthropologist who, following research in Kuwait and the United States, advocates for immigrant women’s rights. She designed a tool to assess the quality of life of Indian servants living in Kuwaiti work camps, reflected in her CNF manuscript, “Desert Butterflies.” She wrote about her extensive work with Florida’s immigrant farming community in her book, “Looking for Esperanza,” the winner of the 2011 Social Justice and Equality Award in Creative Nonfiction. Her memoir, “My Mother’s Funeral,” set in Colombia, will soon be published by CavanKerry Press.  Learn more about Adriana Paramo here.

 

Dr. Margaret Flowers, Pediatrician and Healthcare Activist

Dr. Margaret Flowers is a Maryland pediatrician who left practice to advocate full-time for single-payer health insurance. Despite broad citizen support, Dr. Flowers was stunned by the institutional opposition to the single-payer solution during the national health reform process. In response, she organized protests and was arrested three times for peaceful acts of civil disobedience. Now she is determined to not only change our national healthcare system, but to build an independent, nonviolent broad-based social, economic and environmental justice movement to transform this country. Says Dr. Flowers, “One of the greatest drivers of poor health is wealth inequality.” Learn more about Dr. Margaret Flowers here.

 

Writing for Peace Young Writers' Contest2013 Writing for Peace Young Writers Contest

Guidelines are up for our Young Writers Contest, and this year we are accepting entries online. The contest is open to writers, ages 13-19, in nonfiction, fiction, and poetry divisions. Winners will receive cash awards, be featured in an issue of DoveTales, and receive a hard copy of the journal. You can find the guidelines online here. Learn about our 2012 Winners here.

 

Get involved:

DoveTales, a publication of Writing for Peace

DoveTales Call for Submissions

The Writing for Peace literary journal, DoveTales, is accepting submissions for our inaugural issue to be published online and by print-on-demand on January 1st.  Check out our submission guidelines here.

 

Mentor, photography by Jen Benka

Become a Writing for Peace Mentor

Consider becoming a part of the Writing for Peace mentoring program. Mentors encourage and guide young writers from all over the world, answering craft questions, offering encouragement, and suggestions for further research. Depending on a mentor’s areas of expertise, they may field questions about various peace, human rights, or environmental activism. A mentor might be asked to answer questions about cultural or social issues. Volunteering as a Writing for Peace mentor is a unique way to make a difference through your own writing and life experience. You can find the mentor application here.

 

 

Next time…

Phil Richards, Colgate Professor of English.A Word from Phillip Richards

Don’t miss our next post, when we’ll hear from Phillip Richards.  Phillip is a member of the Writing for Peace Board of Directors and a Colgate University Professor.  Learn more about Phillip Richards here.

 

 

Thank you for your continued support of Writing for Peace. Please share freely!

 

Copyright © 2012 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

 

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One Response to Writing for Peace News, August 2012

  1. Peace song lyric (recorded by Hilltop Records, Hollywood)

    “Earthly Angels”
    Sophie Boswell

    Christmas is always heavenly for some

    But what about our heroes – always on the run

    And looking at the desert skies – praying for an end

    To the futile killing, which they try to mend

    Just imagine that place in the desert, where the hot sand touches the sky

    Nothing is impossible, if only we all try

    Let’s hold hands together and pray to the stars above

    For kindness, peace and compassion, forming a bond of love

    We are only humans – all wanting the same thing

    So why does the scorpion’s tail have to use its sting?

    Just imagine that place in the desert, where the hot sand touches the sky

    Nothing is impossible, if only we all try

    The desert goes on forever, until it reaches the sky

    They merge into each other, or so it seems to the eye

    So why can’t we all do the same, and learn to live in peace

    And come to be accepting of the human race?

    Just imagine that place in the desert, where the hot sand touches the sky

    Nothing is impossible, if only we all try.

    oOo

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