Monthly Archives: January 2018

Young Writers Contest Announcement

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Young Writers Contest Announcement

Now in its sixth year, our annual Writing for Peace Young Writers Contest has had entries from 26 countries and every continent except Antarctica! We’ve extended the deadline to receive essays, poems, and stories from young writers ages 13-19 to April 1st, 2018. Find the full guidelines online here.

We’re excited to announce that this year our prestigious panel of judges are all members of our panel of advisers. Each of them has created a body of work that promotes peace and empathy, demonstrating outstanding creative writing, wisdom, and an innate understanding of the world of human interactions and connectivity. We’re grateful for their service, their time, and their willingness to judge our contest.

Meet Our 2018 Judges:

Patricia Jabbeh Wesley, Writing for Peace AdviserPatricia Jabbeh Wesley, Poetry

Patricia Jabbeh Wesley is an Associate Professor of English and Creative Writing at Penn State University, Altoona. Wesley’s most recent book of poems, “When the Wanderers Come Home,” was written during a four-month stay in her homeland of Liberia in 2013. In his review of the book in World Literature Today, Matthew Shenoda wrote, “Wesley is a poet working to find language that can help show the fractures and fissures of a postwar nation and the personal realities of displacement and return.”

Wesley is the author of four previous collections of poetry and a children’s book. Her poetry has been featured in American Life in Poetry, and her awards include the 2016 WISE Women Award in Arts and Letters, the 2011 President Award from the Blair County NAACP, the 2010 Liberian Award, and a World Bank Fellowship.

 

Adriana Paramo, Writing for Peace AdviserAdriana Paramo, Nonfiction

Adriana is a Colombian writer, born in cold Bogotá but raised in Medellín, The City of Eternal Spring. She received her bachelors of science in Petroleum Engineering and worked as a geophysicist for a multinational oil company for ten years before she left Colombia to make radical changes in her life.  She moved to Alaska where a few years later, she graduated as a Cultural Anthropologist with an emphasis in dance ethnography. In 1996, she moved to Kuwait where she engaged in social activism, advocacy of immigrant women’s rights and designed a tool to assess the quality of life of Indian servants living in Kuwaiti work camps. The findings of this research eventually evolved into “You’re not my Sister,” a CNF work. In 2000, Adriana returned to the USA to teach Humanities and Anthropology to undergraduate students at the local college. She continued her women rights advocacy and did extensive work with the immigrant farming community working in the Florida fields. This research resulted in the production of the manuscript, Looking for Esperanza,” winner of the 2011 Social Justice and Equality Award in Creative Nonfiction, released in 2012 by Benu Press. Her memoir, “My Mother’s Funeral,” set in Colombia, published by CavanKerry Press, was nominated for the Latino Books into Movies Award in 2014. 

Adriana is also on the advisory panel of Writing for Peace, an active member of the travel writing workshop of VONA–Voices of Our Nations Arts Foundation–a community of writers of color, and provides one-on-one mentoring to inmates for a Prison Writing Program.

djelloul-marbrook leaningDjelloul Marbrook, Fiction

Djelloul Marbrook is the acclaimed author of five books of fiction, five books of poetry, and five more books are currently forthcoming from Leaky Boot Press, United Kingdom.

Marbrook won the 2008 Literal Latté fiction prize for “Artists Hill,” an excerpt from Crowds of One, Book 2 in the Guest Boy trilogy. New Millennium Writings has selected four of his stories and one poem in the last 10 years. His work has been published by American Poetry Review, Barrow Street, Coal Hill Review, Omniverse, Galatea Resurrects, Taos Poetry Journal, Onager Editions, Orbis (UK), From the Fishouse, Oberon, The Same, Reed, Fledgling Rag, Pine Hills Review, Le Zaporogue (Denmark), Poets Against the War, Poemeleon, Van Gogh’s Ear Anthology (France), Atticus Review, Onager Editions, Knot Magazine, Deep Water Literary Journal, Red Sky (the Sable Books anthology on violence against women) and Daylight Burglary, among others.

Marbrook maintains a lively presence on Twitter and Facebook. A U.S. Navy veteran and retired newspaper editor, he lives in the mid-Hudson Valley with his wife Marilyn. His newspaper career included the Providence (RI) Journal, the Elmira (NY) Star-Gazette, the Baltimore Sun, the Winston-Salem Journal, the Washington Star, and Media News dailies in northeast Ohio and northern New Jersey. He is the editor-in-chief of Arabesques, a trilingual online and print literary quarterly.

Copyright © 2018 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

President’s Corner: January Hello and Update, By Carmel Mawle

President’s Corner:

Carmel Mawle is the founder of Writing for Peace and serves as President of the Board of Directors.

Carmel Mawle
Founder and President

Hello, friends! I’m hoping that this first post of 2018 finds you all well and on your way to a fruitful new year. We look forward to supporting you in your writing and activism.

First, some news:

President Andrea W. Doray has stepped down for personal reasons, but will continue to serve on our Board of Directors as Past President. We’re grateful for her leadership and vision and look forward to future blog posts from her. The good news is we have an amazing Board of Directors. Our longtime adviser Mary Carroll-Hackett has agreed to serve as Vice President, and I’m honored to once again serve as president of the board and Editor-in-Chief of DoveTales.

Since our Refugees and the Displaced edition of DoveTales was released last year, we have seen rising and unprecedented cruelty in United States immigration policies. Families are torn apart. Patients are dragged from their beds. Immigrants fear calling the police when they are the victims of violent crimes because the call could trigger their own deportation. And asylum seekers, with little chance of a fair review, are being sent back to the countries they fled even though their lives are in danger.

One thing we can and must do is help them get their stories out. You will likely see them in our blog, our journal, our Peace Correspondent, and on our Facebook page. We will also be working to make our annual Youth Summit accessible to those who might benefit from translation. If you’re interested in helping with this project, please send your contact information, resume, and a short introductory paragraph to editor@writingforpeace.org.

While you’ll see lots of new initiatives this year, you can count on our annual publication, DoveTales, an International Journal of the Arts, our Young Writers Contest, and our periodical, The Peace Correspondent.

The theme for our next journal is “Empathy in Art: Embracing the Other.” It promises to be a powerful look at how we connect with each other and move toward compassion. The deadline has been extended to March 15th, and the book will be released on July 1st. We plan to celebrate with launches and readings all over the globe and hope you can join us for one! Check our guidelines for details.

Our Young Writers Contest is up and entries are trickling in from all over the world. The deadline has been extended to April 1st, 2018. As always, there is no fee for participation. For the complete guidelines check our website.

And continue to look forward to our beautifully evolving periodical, The Peace Correspondent. I’ve heard from so many friends who, like myself, experience moments of despair when reading the news these days. The constant negative torrents of media can be overwhelming, but remember that you are not alone. Keep in touch, and spread the word. We’re in this together. Thanks for all you do.

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Copyright © 2018 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.