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July 10 Friday Live Reading with Stephen Kuusisto

This Friday, July 10th, at 8pm ET, Stephen Kuusisto will read from his latest book, Have Dog, Will Travel, published by Simon & Schuster, and discuss his work, process, and activism. We hope you’ll join us!

Stephen Kuusisto, Photo Credit Connie Kuusisto

About Stephen Kuusisto

Stephen Kuusisto is the author of the memoirs Have Dog, Will Travel; Planet of the Blind (a New York Times “Notable Book of the Year”); and Eavesdropping: A Memoir of Blindness and Listening and of the poetry collections Only Bread, Only Light and Letters to Borges. A graduate of the Iowa Writer’s Workshop and a Fulbright Scholar, he has taught at the University of Iowa, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, and Ohio State University. He currently teaches at Syracuse University where he holds a professorship in the Center on Human Policy, Law, and Disability Studies. He is a frequent speaker in the US and abroad. His website is StephenKuusisto.com.

881 5140 8831
011368

Copyright © 2020 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

2020 Young Writers Contest Results

We are excited to announce the winners of our 2020 Young Writers Contest, a challenge designed to develop empathy in our future leaders and introduce emerging young voices from all over the world. Our Young Writers Contest requires a commitment to research and the craft of writing, as well as a willingness to challenge personal assumptions. Entries from nearly every continent exemplified this commitment, and many of our young writers are working in a second language. This year we have added a $200 award for our Grand Prize Winner. We welcome writers from Cambodia, Kenya, Nepal, Romania, and Brazil, joining other young writers from a total of 30 countries. It has been an honor and privilege to read their work.

Completing this challenge is no small achievement and this year we received a record number of outstanding entries. We would like to acknowledge all of the young writers who took the time to research a new culture and write a story, essay, or poem for the Writing for Peace Young Writers Contest with an invitation to continue refining your craft through our Friday Live Readings, Young Writer Resources, and Youth Summits. We hope you will take advantage of our more accessible DoveTales Literary Journal online, reading the work of contributors hailing from all over this beautiful globe.

Additionally, we would like to thank the teachers and mentors who encouraged their students to take our challenge, and then guided them to prepare their best work. We would also like to thank the many volunteer readers who made this contest possible.

Our Grand Prize Winner, as well as first, second and third place winners’ work will be published on August 1st, 2020 online in our “Resistance” themed edition of DoveTales, An International Journal of the Arts, Guest Edited by Brad Wetzler. Finalists will be published here in our blog during the month of July.

2020 Young Writers Contest Winners

In Poetry~

First Place: Amy Liu from Warrington, Pennsylvania, United States, for “Confessions from Forgotten Fields.” Amy attends Central Bucks High School South and is in 11th Grade.

Second Place: Lauren Young from Stamford, Connecticut, United States, for “Burn.” Lauren attends Trinity Catholic High School and is in 12th Grade.

Third Place: Mariana Kovalik Silva from Curitiba, Brazil for “Tank Man.” Mariana attends Phillips Academy and is in 12th Grade.

Finalists: Giuliana Spanarelli from Fairfield, New Jersey, United States, for “I Am” and Adler Schultz from Newton, Massachusetts, United States, for “Thunder Over Warsaw.”

In Fiction~

First Place: Sofia Perez from Warwickshire, United Kingdom, for “The Atlas.” Sofia attends King’s Highschool for Girls and is in the 10th Grade.

Second Place: Maryam Muheeb from Lagos, Nigeria, for “Aster Street.” Maryam attends Livingstone Model College and is in 12th Grade.

Third Place: Lulu Griffin from La Grange, Illinois, United States, for “By the Light of a Lantern.” Lulu attends Lyons Township High School and is in 12th Grade.

Finalists: Sophia Fang from Sandiego, California, United States, for “Zongzi” and Karen Umeora from Jonesboro, Arkansas, United States, for “Beloved.”

In Nonfiction~

First Place: Aim Poonsornsiri, from Bangkok, Thailand for “Twisted Roots.” Aim attends Deerfield Academy and is in 11th Grade.

Second Place: Lydia Qin, from Los Angeles, California, United States, for “Silent Isolation.” Lydia attends North Hollywood High School and is in 10th Grade.

Third Place: Maxine Magtoto, from Pasig City, Philippines, for “Braving A New Frontier: The Case for Moroccan Linguistics.”  Maxine attends Brent International School Manila and is in 11th Grade.

Finalists: Se Eun Pak (Grade 10), South Korea, for “A Bloody Battle” and Seohyun Yoon (Grade 11), Virginia, United States, for “The Flower of Egypt.”

And the 2020 Grand Prize of $200 goes to…

Grand Prize Winner

Anya (Anna) Trofimova from London, United Kingdom, for her passionately astute poem “Observations Inspired by Rising Sea Levels.” Anna attends St. Paul’s Girls’ School and is in 10th Grade.


Congratulations to one and all!


Copyright © 2020 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

June 26, Friday Live with Lyla June, A W4P Reading Series

Join the June 26th Writing for Peace Friday Live Reading with Lyla June Johnston.

Friday, June 26th, at 8pm EDT Click here to join.

Lyla June Johnston (known publicly as Lyla June) will read her essay, “The Story of How Humanity Fell In Love With Itself Once Again,” and discuss her writing process and activism. Learn more about Lyla June and read more of her work here.

Meeting ID: 865 8222 3528
Password: 705037

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86582223528?pwd=L0tURk9vbWtMNlJpZFZocWdMUytwdz09

Lyla June is an Indigenous musician, scholar, and community servant of Diné (Navajo), Tsétsêhéstâhese (Cheyenne) and European lineages. Her dynamic, multi-genre presentation style has engaged audiences across the globe towards personal, collective and ecological healing. She blends studies in Human Ecology at Stanford, graduate work in Indigenous Pedagogy, and the traditional worldview she grew up with to inform her perspectives and solutions. She is currently pursuing her doctoral degree, focusing on Indigenous food systems revitalization.

Lyla June is a student of global cycles of violence that eventually gave rise to The Native American Holocaust and the destruction of many cyclic relationships between human beings and nature. This exploration birthed her passion for revitalizing spiritual relationships with Mother Earth and cultivating spaces for forgiveness and reconciliation to occur between cultural groups.

In 2012, she graduated with honors from Stanford University with a degree in Environmental Anthropology. During her time there she wrote the award winning papers: Nature and the Supernatural: The Role of Culture and Spirituality in Sustaining Primate Populations in Manu National Park, Peru and Chonos Pom: Ethnic Endemism Among the Winnemem Wintu and the Cultural Impacts of Enlarging Shasta Reservoir.

She spends her free time learning her endangered mother tongue, planting corn, beans and squash and spending time with elders who retain traditional spiritual and ecological knowledge.

Meeting:
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86582223528?pwd=L0tURk9vbWtMNlJpZFZocWdMUytwdz09

Meeting ID: 865 8222 3528
Password: 705037

Copyright © 2020 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

Resistance DoveTales, Friday Live Readings, and E. Ethelbert Miller Essay

“Resistance” Deadline Extended

Brad Wetzler, Guest Editor

On Monday, writers submitting their work to be considered for our “Resistance” edition of DoveTales  found that our Submittable account had been closed before the June 15th deadline. Apparently, we received so many submissions that we exceed a maximum that we weren’t aware of. The problem has been remedied, and the deadline has been extended to June 20th. We apologize for the inconvenience. Read our full guidelines here.

Friday Live Reading Series

Adviser Lyla June Johnston

Every other Friday, Writing for Peace hosts an hour long reading and discussion on Zoom. It’s casual and conversational, and we always learn something that inspires us in our own writing. Our next reading will be on June 26th with Lyla June Johnston. An adviser since 2013, Lyla June Johnston is an Indigenous musician, scholar, and community servant of Diné (Navajo), Tsétsêhéstâhese (Cheyenne) and European lineages. Her dynamic, multi-genre presentation style has engaged audiences across the globe towards personal, collective and ecological healing.

Check out our complete author lineup, watch videos of our previous readings, and support our fellow writers by purchasing their work. Go to our Friday Live Reading page here.

America Upside Down

Our country is in the midst of a paradigm shift

By Adviser E. Ethelbert Miller | June 15, 2020

Adviser E. Ethelbert Miller

Social historian Vincent Harding often felt it was best to describe black history as being much like a river, flowing toward freedom and the delta of democracy. The challenge we face today is how to navigate this river. Our inability to do this too often leads us to compare historical incidents and movements to one another. We see a protest or a riot and we immediately compare it to the 1960s. Why should one be surprised by police brutality in the black community? Hasn’t there always been one historical moment flowing into the next?

Read the entire article in The American Scholar here.

Young Writers Contest

The 2020 Young Writers Contest is closed. Announcements will be made in our blog on July 1st, 2020.

Copyright © 2020 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

Keep Moving, Friday Live with Erin Soros, Lorraine Currelley Honored

Keep Moving

By Carmel Mawle

I’ve got a lot to learn. That’s one of many reasons I’m so grateful for our Writing for Peace advisers. They come from different backgrounds, surviving personal hardships, war, and genocide. But rather than being defeated, they have grown in empathy and wisdom from those experiences. From life’s brutalities, they have crafted art and lives that serve as an inspiration to young writers and all of us in our Writing for Peace community. I am grateful that they don’t hesitate to give me their thoughts.

Recently I share a “Bored Panda” article on our Facebook page. It included 35 “feel-good” images of police marching with protesters, police taking a knee at the demonstrations, protesters preventing crimes and, in one case, protecting an officer who was separated from his group. My reaction to this post was similar to most of our readers who responded with likes and hearts and shares. It was encouraging to see what looked like progress.

And then I received the first message from an adviser with concern about this post. She had seen one of the pictures circulating on right-wing pages. Although she honored the sincere actions of the protesters, she wondered if some might view the image of black protesters protecting a white police officer as underlining white supremacy’s assumption that African Americans should sacrifice themselves for white Americans. She invoked Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin.

She made a good point. I contacted several other friends and advisers and heard reactions ranging from discussions of systemic oppression and the police as an enforcement arm of the oppressive state, to one in all capital letters warning that many of those pictures were staged. I took the post down because it seemed to cause pain more than promote peace. As it turns out, at least one of the officers who took a knee in front of the protesters had been guilty of police brutality himself.

A member of our Writing for Peace family after a recent protest.

What is true: We are protesting the cold-blooded murder of George Floyd and countless victims of the institutionalized and systemic genocide of black and brown people.

Writers for Peace are marching, working to Get Out The Vote, writing and calling their representatives, and creating resistance art that promotes truth. While some of us are unable to physically join the protests, we are working toward a more just world in other ways. We will continue to learn and grow, and keep moving forward.

And we will continue to be patient with ourselves and each other in this journey. We will give each other the benefit of the doubt in the knowledge that we are all doing what we can.

Stay safe and well. Be careful out there.

 

Carmel Mawle is founder of the nonprofit literary organization, Writing for Peace, and has served as Editor-in-Chief of DoveTales, An International Journal of the Arts since 2013. A Pushcart Nominee, her short stories, essays and poetry have been published in literary journals and anthologies, including Smokelong Quarterly and KNOTS Literary Magazine.


Writing for Peace News

Friday Live Reading Series

This Friday, June 12th, at 8pm EDT, Erin Soros will read from her work and give a short craft talk about her Lyric Essay process. Please help spread the word, and join the reading here.

868 2770 4845.

Erin Soros is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Society for the Humanities at Cornell University where she is researching psychoanalytic conceptions of psychic energy and psychosis as a response to trauma.  She has published fiction and nonfiction in international anthologies and journals, including Short Fiction, The Iowa Review, The Indiana Review, Exile Literary Quarterly, Geist, Prism, West Coast Line, Fiddlehead and enRoute, and her stories have been produced for the CBC and BBC as winners of the CBC Literary Award and the Commonwealth Award for the Short Story.  Her academic articles weaving psychoanalysis, philosophy and autobiographical narrative have appeared in such journals as differences: A Journal of Feminist Cultural StudiesThe Journal of Intercultural Studies, The Journal of Curriculum Theorizing, and The Canadian Journal of Women and the Law.  New work has appeared in Literatures of Madness, published by Palgrave Macmillan, and in Women and the Psychosocial Construction of Madness, Lexington Press. Soros has been a visiting writer at four universities, most recently as the Harper-Wood fellow at St. John’s College at the University of Cambridge, a position that funded travel to learn from Inuvialuit oral history in Canada’s Western Arctic.  She was also a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in the Jackman Humanities Institute at the University of Toronto where she researched correspondences and tensions between Indigenous and settler understandings of the mind.  She has received a Fulbright Award, the Governor General’s Gold Medal, and two teaching awards, including Columbia University’s Presidential Award for Excellence in Teaching.

Read one of her lyric essays here.

Congratulations to Adviser Lorraine Currelley

Lorraine Currelley, Executive Director for the Bronx Book Fair and Poets Network & Exchange is the State of New York Bronx Beat Poet Laureate 2020-2022. The award was bestowed by the National Beat Poetry Foundation.

Read the full article here.

Call for Submissions: Resistance

The Summer Issue of DoveTales, An International Online Journal of the Arts will be published on August 1st, 2020. Our guest editor is Brad Wetzler. His theme is “Resistance.” Reading period will close on June 15th, 2020.

Read the complete guidelines here.

 

Young Writers Contest

The 2020 Young Writers Contest is closed. Results will be announced here on July 1st, 2020.

Copyright © 2020 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

May 29, Friday Live with Veronica Golos, A W4P Reading Series

Join the May 29th Writing for Peace Friday Live Reading with Veronica Golos

On Friday, May 29th, at 8pm EDT, Veronica Golos will read from her latest book of poems, Girl, published by 3: A Taos Press. We hope you’ll invite all your friends and join us on Zoom to ask your questions and hear Veronica Golos read her work. You can purchase her book by contacting her at veronicagolos@yahoo.com.

Connect to Veronica Golos Reading Here

Meeting I.D. 827-5887-0958 Password: 690434
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82758870958?pwd=djY3NUZlZ1hpZ3RjL1VSRnV4YnRXUT09

Learn more about Veronica Golos’ latest book, GIRL.

Phillip Richards Review “In Girl, Golos makes use of the conventions and motifs of the fairy tale to translate its realistic subject matter into symbolist levels of meaning. Her narrative turns inward, producing an autobiographical tale reminiscent of Ralph Waldo Emerson’s early essays ‘Nature’ and ‘Self- Reliance,’ Walt Whitman’s Song of Myself, Henry David Thoreau’s Walden, and Adrienne Rich’s middle-period collections, Diving into the Wreck and The Will to Change. Girl gives us not a factual history, but an extended poetic myth of an evolving inner self and political consciousness.” Read Entire Phillip Richards Review Here.

GIRL: A Review by Gary Worth Moody “No other poet inhabits persona as completely as does Veronica. GIRL is a masterpiece of shifting linguistic space and time. The space of the narrative defies topology. Time becomes rhythm becomes JAZZ. The music morphs from species to species.The lyric becomes prayer, becomes rant, becomes, an evolutionary triptych. Every gender on the planet should go buy this book and read it, to each other, to their lovers, to their daughters, to their sons, to their parents, to their husbands, to their wives, to their priests, even to their shamans, There are truths inside. INSIDE EVERY WOLF IS A GIRL.” Read entire Gary Worth Moody Review Here.

You can purchase her beautiful book by contacting her at veronicagolos@yahoo.com.

About Veronica Golos

Veronica Golos is founding co-editor of the Taos Journal of International Poetry & Art, former poetry editor for the Journal of Feminist Studies in Religion, and core faculty at Tupelo Press’s Writers Conferences. Golos is the author of four poetry books, GIRL (3: A Taos Press) awarded the Naji Naaman Honor Prize for Poetry, 2019 (Beirut, Lebanon); Rootwork (3: A Taos Press, 2015); Vocabulary of Silence (Red Hen Press, 2011), winner of the 2011 New Mexico Book Award, translated into Arabic by poet Nizar Sartawi; and A Bell Buried Deep (Storyline Press, 2004), co-winner of the 16th Annual Nicholas Roerich Poetry Prize, adapted for stage and performed at Claremont School of Theology, Claremont, CA. Golos has read or lectured at Columbia University’s Teacher’s College, Hunter College, Juilliard School of Music, Regis University, University of New Mexico, Diné (Navajo) Technical College, Kansas State University, Transylvania University, and Colorado (Pueblo) University, among others. She lives in Taos, NM, with her husband, David Pérez.

Veronica Golos’ fourth poetry book, Girl, deepens her impressive command of utterance and dialectic. Lifting off the page, the poems execute with precision the internal, deep prayered world of Girl and the outer, harsh unprayered world. The poems articulate both the inability to express oneself and the refusal to do so as an act of self-hood and rebellion. Alternating voices rub against the sensual life: the splendid mane of horses, leaving the body for a night sky, the dive into green waters. Golos’ use of poetic and visual form, prophesy, fairy tale, and myth captures a delicate vulnerability in a threatening world. Her poems invoke a frisson of daughtermotherhood—an arc of loss and reunion. Girl reminds us of the intelligence of childhood: perceptive, gifted, imaginative—a communion between hope and ache.

Golos’s poems are included in The Poet’s CraftAnnie Finch, Editor, 2012, University of Michigan Press; Collecting Life: Poets on Objects Known and Imagined, 3: A Taos Press, 2011, and in journals including Spillway, Meridians, Drunken Boat, Orion, Cimarron, Contemporary World Literature, Sin Fronteras, Verso (Paris), Poetry (London), Rattle, World Literature Magazine Spring’s Forum.

Translated Poems from Vocabulary of Silence have appeared in over 24 journals and publications throughout the Middle East including (Syria), www.nabee.awatf.com, www.saddana.com, (UAE),www.shenrayar.com/ar, (Iraq)   www.Alimbaratur.com  (Denmark) and Maqal (Kuwait).


Young Writers Contest – Enter to Win our $200 Grand Prize

Writing for Peace challenges young writers (ages 13-19) to expand their empathy skills by researching an unfamiliar culture and writing from the point-of-view of a character within that new world, while exploring social, political, and environmental pressures, and universal themes. The deadline for entrance is June 1st, 2020. There is no fee for participation. Writers, ages 13-19, may submit in one of three categories – poetry, fiction, or nonfiction. For more information, go to our Young Writers Contest Guidelines page.


Call for Submissions: Resistance

The Summer Issue of DoveTales, An International Online Journal of the Arts will be published on August 1st, 2020. Our guest editor is Brad Wetzler. His theme is “Resistance.” Reading period will open on March 16th, 2020, and  close on June 15th, 2020. Read the complete guidelines here.

 

Copyright © 2020 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

May 15, Friday Live with Wang Ping, A W4P Reading Series

An earlier post went out with the incorrect date.  Please note the reading is this coming Friday, May 15th.

This Friday, May 15th, at 8pm EDT, Writing for Peace welcomes poet and activist Wang Ping in the second of our Friday Live Series. Join us on Zoom to hear Wang Ping read from her new book, My Name Is Immigrant, and ask your questions as a part of the Writing for Peace community. 

Meeting I.D. 862-8000-5860  Password: 230669
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86280005860?pwd=S2tQOEpsaWdDSHJaRStST0hkZVg4QT09

About Wang Ping

Writing for Peace Adviser Wang PingWang Ping was born in Shanghai and grew up on a small island in the East China Sea. After three years farming in a mountain village, and with little prior formal education available, she attended Beijing University. In 1985 she left China to study in the U.S., earning her Ph.D. from New York University.

Her previous books include three collections of poetry, The Magic Whip, Of Flesh & Spirit, and Ten Thousand Waves; the cultural study Aching for Beauty: Footbinding in China (Eugene M. Kayden Award for Best Book in the Humanities); the novel Foreign Devil; two collections of fiction stories entitled American Visa (NYC Public Library Award for the Teen Age) and The Last Communist Virgin (Minnesota Book Award for Novel & Short Story and Book Award from the Association for Asian American Studies for Poetry/Prose); a children’s book of Chinese folk lore, The Dragon Emperor; and a book of creative nonfiction, Life of Miracles along the Yangtze and Mississippi (AWP Award Series Winner for Creative Nonfiction). She is also the editor and co-translator of the anthology New Generation: Poetry from China Today, co-translator of Flames by Xue Di, and co-translator of Flash Cards: Poems by Yu Jian.

Wang Ping is also a photographer and multimedia artist. Her exhibitions address global themes of industrialization, the environment, interdependency, and the people. She currently lives in St. Paul, MN, and is a professor of English at Macalester College and founder of the Kinship of Rivers project. Visit WangPing.com and KinshipOfRivers.org for more information.

Praise for Wang Ping

“Wang Ping has had a fascinating life between China and the United States. Meeting her for the first time in person was an impressive experience and my admiration for her only grew. Her work with rivers and with other aspects of the landscape is totally refreshing, and her broad intelligence, delightful political wit and poetic vision expands understanding of the American nation.”

— Gary Snyder, winner of a Pulitzer Prize for Poetry and the American Book Award


Young Writers Contest – Enter to Win our $200 Grand Prize

Writing for Peace challenges young writers (ages 13-19) to expand their empathy skills by researching an unfamiliar culture and writing from the point-of-view of a character within that new world, while exploring social, political, and environmental pressures, and universal themes. The deadline for entrance is June 1st, 2020. There is no fee for participation. Writers, ages 13-19, may submit in one of three categories – poetry, fiction, or nonfiction. For more information, go to our Young Writers Contest Guidelines page.


Call for Submissions: Resistance

The Summer Issue of DoveTales, An International Online Journal of the Arts will be published on August 1st, 2020. Our guest editor is Brad Wetzler. His theme is “Resistance.” Reading period will open on March 16th, 2020, and  close on June 15th, 2020. Read the complete guidelines here.

 

Copyright © 2020 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

Friday Live with Wang Ping, A W4P Reading Series

This Friday, May 15th, at 8pm EDT, Writing for Peace welcomes poet and activist Wang Ping in the second of our Friday Live Series. Join us on Zoom to hear Wang Ping read from her new book, My Name Is Immigrant, and ask your questions as a part of the Writing for Peace community. 

Meeting I.D. 862-8000-5860  Password: 230669
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86280005860?pwd=S2tQOEpsaWdDSHJaRStST0hkZVg4QT09

About Wang Ping

Writing for Peace Adviser Wang PingWang Ping was born in Shanghai and grew up on a small island in the East China Sea. After three years farming in a mountain village, and with little prior formal education available, she attended Beijing University. In 1985 she left China to study in the U.S., earning her Ph.D. from New York University.

Her previous books include three collections of poetry, The Magic Whip, Of Flesh & Spirit, and Ten Thousand Waves; the cultural study Aching for Beauty: Footbinding in China (Eugene M. Kayden Award for Best Book in the Humanities); the novel Foreign Devil; two collections of fiction stories entitled American Visa (NYC Public Library Award for the Teen Age) and The Last Communist Virgin (Minnesota Book Award for Novel & Short Story and Book Award from the Association for Asian American Studies for Poetry/Prose); a children’s book of Chinese folk lore, The Dragon Emperor; and a book of creative nonfiction, Life of Miracles along the Yangtze and Mississippi (AWP Award Series Winner for Creative Nonfiction). She is also the editor and co-translator of the anthology New Generation: Poetry from China Today, co-translator of Flames by Xue Di, and co-translator of Flash Cards: Poems by Yu Jian.

Wang Ping is also a photographer and multimedia artist. Her exhibitions address global themes of industrialization, the environment, interdependency, and the people. She currently lives in St. Paul, MN, and is a professor of English at Macalester College and founder of the Kinship of Rivers project. Visit WangPing.com and KinshipOfRivers.org for more information.

Praise for Wang Ping

“Wang Ping has had a fascinating life between China and the United States. Meeting her for the first time in person was an impressive experience and my admiration for her only grew. Her work with rivers and with other aspects of the landscape is totally refreshing, and her broad intelligence, delightful political wit and poetic vision expands understanding of the American nation.”

— Gary Snyder, winner of a Pulitzer Prize for Poetry and the American Book Award


Young Writers Contest – Enter to Win our $200 Grand Prize

Writing for Peace challenges young writers (ages 13-19) to expand their empathy skills by researching an unfamiliar culture and writing from the point-of-view of a character within that new world, while exploring social, political, and environmental pressures, and universal themes. The deadline for entrance is June 1st, 2020. There is no fee for participation. Writers, ages 13-19, may submit in one of three categories – poetry, fiction, or nonfiction. For more information, go to our Young Writers Contest Guidelines page.


Call for Submissions: Resistance

The Summer Issue of DoveTales, An International Online Journal of the Arts will be published on August 1st, 2020. Our guest editor is Brad Wetzler. His theme is “Resistance.” Reading period will open on March 16th, 2020, and  close on June 15th, 2020. Read the complete guidelines here.

Copyright © 2020 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

Pandemic Solidarity, Friday Live Series, and Resistance Swag

A word on pandemic solidarity. After weeks of missing loved ones, strained budgets and toilet paper shortages, sterilizing everything that comes through the door, and (for many) homeschooling, it’s natural to be tempted to let our guards down. Dear writers for peace, we hope you’ll stay strong and continue to practice social distancing. This too will pass, and with it’s sorrows and horrors, there will be new insights that guide us on our individual paths as writers. Stay safe, and together we’ll persevere, refine our craft, and emerge on the other side with increased power of the pen.

To that end, Writing for Peace has started a new Friday Live Reading Series on Zoom. Hear extraordinary writers read and discuss their work in a casual community environment that encourages your questions and participation. Our first Friday Live Reading was last Friday with E. Ethelbert Miller. You won’t want to miss our next Friday Live Reading with poet and activist Wang Ping on May 15th, at 8pm (EDT). She’ll read and discuss her new book, My Name Is Immigrant and answer your questions. The Zoom links and passwords will go up on our calendar and you’ll find all that information in our post next Monday.  Be sure to check frequently as our Friday Live line up takes shape. Also, find the event invite on our Facebook page and let us know you’re coming. We hope to see you and hear your questions at all our readings!

2020 Upcoming Friday Live Readings, 8pm EDT

May 15, Wang Ping

May 29, Veronica Golos

June 12, Djelloul Marbrook

July 10, Stephen Kuusisto

July 24, Martín Espada

August 21, R. L. Maizes


Writing for Peace Swag

In honor of our coming Resistance DoveTales, we’ve created a line of T-shirts, hoodies, and bags with the resistance protest sign you’ve seen at marches. Social distancing may prevent us from marching shoulder to shoulder for a little while, but the resistance continues. Check them out at our new Writing for Peace Swag store. And thank you for supporting Writing for Peace.


Copyright © 2020 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

Friday Live with E. Ethelbert Miller, A W4P Reading Series

Announcing our new Friday Live Reading Series!

Beginning on May 1st, at 8pm ET, with E. Ethelbert Miller, Writing for Peace will host a reading of extraordinary poets and writers every other Friday evening in Zoom. It will be a chance to not only hear our guests read, but also ask your questions as a part of the Writing for Peace community.  This Friday, E. Ethelbert Miller will read from unpublished work as well as from his latest book, If God Invented Baseball.  You can purchase his book through Simon and Schuster here. We hope you’ll invite all your friends and join us this Friday!

About E. Ethelbert Miller

E. Ethelbert Miller is a writer and literary activist. He is the author of two memoirs and several books of poetry including The Collected Poems of E. Ethelbert Miller, a comprehensive collection that represents over 40 years of his work. For 17 years Miller served as the editor of Poet Lore, the oldest poetry magazine published in the United States. His poetry has been translated into nearly a dozen languages. Miller is a two-time Fulbright Senior Specialist Program Fellow to Israel. He holds an honorary degree of Doctor of Literature from Emory and Henry College and has taught at several universities.

Miller is host of the weekly WPFW morning radio show On the Margin with E. Ethelbert Miller and host and producer of The Scholars on UDC-TV. In recent years, Miller has been inducted into the 2015 Washington DC Hall of Fame and awarded the 2016 AWP George Garrett Award for Outstanding Community Service in Literature and the 2016 DCMayor’s Arts Award for Distinguished Honor. In 2018, he was inducted into Gamma Xi Phi and appointed as an ambassador for the Authors Guild. Miller’s most recent book If God Invented Baseball, published by City Point Press, was awarded the 2019 Literary Award for poetry by the Black Caucus of the American Library Association.

Join the Writing for Peace Friday Live Reading with E. Ethelbert Miller

When: Friday, May 1st, 2020, from 8-9pm ET
Where: Meeting ID: 841 3395 3865, Password: 545964

Connect to E. Ethelbert Miller Reading Here


Young Writers Contest Deadline Extended

Due to the Covid-19 Pandemic, the Writing for Peace Board of Directors has decided to extend the deadline for our 2020 Young Writers Contest to June 1st.

Enter to Win our $200 Grand Prize

Writing for Peace challenges young writers (ages 13-19) to expand their empathy skills by researching an unfamiliar culture and writing from the point-of-view of a character within that new world, while exploring social, political, and environmental pressures, and universal themes.

  • The deadline for entrance is June 1st, 2020.
  • There is no fee for participation.
  • Writers, ages 13-19, may submit in one of three categories – poetry, fiction, or nonfiction. Ages are counted from the entry date, and entrants are required to show proof of age (those images are never shared publicly).
  • Winners and published finalists will be asked to submit an author’s photograph and biography. We encourage you to explore the past winners’ pages on our website to see the types of information and pictures authors share.
  • The contest is open internationally, but all submissions must be written in English and submitted with the completed form. Both American and British English are accepted.

For more information, go to our Young Writers Contest Guidelines page.

Copyright © 2019 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.