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Writing for Peace News, August 5th, 2019

Writing for Peace News

DoveTales Online

DoveTales Online, One World, One People went live on August 1st. Find work from our panel of advisers, emerging, and award-winning writers and artists, as well as the winning stories, poems and essays from our 2019 Young Writers Contest. Stats confirm we’re reaching a much broader audience online. We’re also sharing DoveTales pieces on our Facebook page, so keep and eye out for them!

Now Reading for February Issue of DoveTales Online

The reading period for our next DoveTales Online, Guest Edited by Writing for Peace Adviser, Robert Kostuck is now open. He has themed our February issue, “Gardens in the Desert: Cultivating Awareness.”

In a world where mass shootings have become commonplace, where  politicians and their supporters revel in violent and divisive rhetoric, where television sets and the internet spew hate-filled propaganda, awareness can seem like an oasis in the desert. How will we cultivate gardens of empathy, compassion, and common sense in these barren deserts?

2019 Writing for Peace Online Youth Summit

Now accepting submissions for the Youth Summit here.

Theme: Day By Day, Hand in Hand: Seeing & Creating Peace in Daily Action

This year’s summit will focus on the power of individual, community,  and grassroots activism, exploring what we as individuals can do in our day to day lives to work toward the peace we all desire and deserve.

Join young artists, writers, and activists from around the world in conversation about the matters you care about in this online gathering. Our keynotes, young people making significant change in the world, and submitted creative work from participants, invite open and caring conversations about peace and activism in our troubled times.

Young Writers Contest

Our 2020 Young Writers Contest will begin accepting entries on September 1st. We invite teachers to make our contest a part of your regular writing curriculum. Contact us at editor@writingforpeace.org.

Now accepting applications to our Panel of Advisers

Among our panel members are poets, novelists, memoirists, and essayists – artists who have achieved a level of personal integrity in their work that inspires each of us to search for our own truth. Some panel members inspire us through their life choices, perhaps recognizing a calling toward peace after they were already well established in other careers. They show us that it is never too late to find personal fulfillment in working toward a greater good.

Advisers will be asked to contribute periodically to our blog and DoveTales Online Journal, and help with the local promotion of Writing for Peace events, publications, and readings.

Please send resumes and letters of intent to editor@writingforpeace.org.


Keep the faith and keep on writing!

Poetry       Fiction       Nonfiction       Art & Photography       Young Writers    About DoveTales      Submissions    

Copyright © 2019 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

DoveTales Online, Issue 1 – August 2019

Our first issue of DoveTales Online is up!

DoveTales, a publication of Writing for PeaceSince 2013, Writing for Peace has invited writers and artists from all over the globe to explore themes within the context of current events. Their responsespoetry, fiction, nonfiction, art and photographytell us something about the nature of humanity. We learn from each other. We share our joys and grief, empathy and compassion, the wisdom of years and youth, and the dream of a world that is healthy and diverse, with equality and justice for every sentient beingwhether or not they can afford political lobbyists. This philosophy resulted in a collection of beautiful print booksOccupied, Contrast, Nature, Family and Cultural Identity, Refugees and the Displaced, and Empathy in Art: Embracing the Otherthat educate, inspire, and challenge us.

We continue this tradition with our new online journal, celebrating the community we have built together, and supporting each other in our efforts to leave this world a better place for future generations—and being online, we can do it with more color, audio and videos!

In this, our first issue of DoveTales Online, you’ll find our 2019 Young Writers Contest Winners, as well as poetry, prose, and visual art that delves into our Guest Editor, Patricia Jabbeh Wesley’s theme: “One World, One People.” If this theme seems incongruous with our daily news, make a cup of tea, get comfortable, and find out what her thought process was in choosing it. Thank you for joining us in the debut of DoveTales, An International Online Journal of the Arts!

Check out DoveTales Online Now ~

 

Copyright © 2019 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

Good things are coming!

Good morning, peace writers!

Hoping you’re all feeling energized by the latest news and not despairing. Good things are happening. Light is shining in dark places. Hidden evils are being revealed. Remember, when horrible news surfaces—over 900 children separated from their parents since this disastrous policy was “ended,” mass shootings becoming commonplace, climate change speeding up and scientists silenced, to name a few—it is because writers and activists are refusing to let them fester in the dark. Hard truths gain power when they are kept secrets, so let’s celebrate the knowing and keep on pushing forward. We’re in this together.

We’re working hard here at Writing for Peace. If you’re reading this on the website, you may have already seen some changes there. The site is looking pretty slicknew event calendar, streamlined format, and mobile responsive. It should be much easier to navigate on any device. All this in preparation for the launch of our beautiful new online DoveTales!

Tomorrow is the big day. DoveTales, An International Journal of the Arts is going online! I’m seeing it take shape here, and it’s absolutely gorgeous. Guest editor Patricia Jabbeh Wesley’s theme, “One World, One People,” has resonated with writers and artists across the globe. You’ll find hard truth, hope, love and laughter in its illuminated pages. And you won’t want to miss our young writers’ beautiful winning poems, essays and stories.

So keep the faith and watch for our new DoveTales tomorrow. We’ll be working right up until it launches, so send a good thought our way.

Wishing you peace and strength,

Carmel

Carmel Mawle is founder of the nonprofit literary organization, Writing for Peace, and has served as Editor-in-Chief of DoveTales, An International Journal of the Arts since 2013. A Pushcart Nominee, her short stories, essays and poetry have been published in literary journals and anthologies, including Smokelong Quarterly and Shake the Tree Anthology.

Copyright © 2019 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

We must always take sides, By Andrea Doray

Andrea_final--2 (2)You can’t write about character and the human condition and be apolitical … that’s not the kind of world we’ve ever lived in.” — Sam Hamill, in a 2006 Poetry Foundation interview.

The world lost a powerful voice last year when Sam Hamill died. Hamill served as an advisor to the international organization, Writing for Peace, founded Poets Against the War, and spoke for people who otherwise could not. We need more Sam Hamills. We must always take sides.

Some people have told me that sometimes this column is too political. Some others have asked me to take a stronger stance. Some people have called me unpleasant names and some have supported my perspectives.

We live in widely diverse society where, ostensibly, we are all free to disagree in this way. And so we celebrate the birth of our country, and the freedoms that are supposed to allow us to speak without fear of government reprisal, to worship without fear of governmental oppression, to benefit from a free and open press.

It’s worth noting not only this vision of our founders, but also the courage of those who have fought for their ideals. My parents were among these. Both enlisted in the Army to serve in World War II. Both left their homes to help protect people they didn’t know. Both risked their lives for a cause greater than themselves.

I write at this time each year to honor Eva Levine, born on July 6, 1916. Eva was rounded up and transported from Poland, her homeland, to Bergen-Belsen, for no other reason than that she was Jewish. She lost her health, her husband and the rest of her family in the brutality of the Nazi death camps.

According to United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. – where I received Eva’s information on ID card #2633 – after she was liberated by the British in 1945, Eva emigrated to the U.S. in 1950 and nothing more is known of her.

Yet I will continue to commemorate her, and the millions who suffered with her. I will also continue to stand up for victims who suffer today … because of their faith, their heritage, their gender, because of where they were born, how they were born, or who they love.

In these times of polarized, normalized and codified hatred, at home and abroad, I believe it’s more important than ever to recognize the men and women (Abigail Adams, anyone?) whose struggles birthed our nation. It’s more important than ever to recognize the sacrifices of the men and women who keep, and have kept, these ideals alive. It’s more important than ever to recognize that we each, each, have a role in the future that faces us—not just for ourselves, but for others who may be suffering. The lessons of the Holocaust have taught us this.

We have also learned that to be silent is to become complicit … Albert Einstein, Desmond Tutu, Elie Wiesel and countless others have warned that when we are neutral in situations of injustice, we have, in essence, chosen the side of the oppressor.

If this means, then, that we are not apolitical, so be it. Perhaps, as Mother Teresa said, “If we have no peace, it is because we have forgotten that we belong to each other.”

Andrea Doray is a writer who believes in the words of Elie Wiesel: “We must always take sides … the opposite of love is not hate, it’s indifference.” Contact Andrea at a.doray@andreadoray.com.

Previously published by Arvada Press. Reprinted by permission of the author.

2019 Young Writers Contest Winners Announcement

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We are thrilled to announce the winners to our 2019 Young Writers Contest, an annual event that introduces emerging young voices from all over the world. Participating in the Writing for Peace Young Writers Contest takes a commitment to research, an open mind, and refining the craft of writing. Entries from across the globe exemplified this commitment, and many of our young writers are working in a second language. This year we are excited to welcome writers from the Philippines, Morocco, and Japan, joining other forward thinking future leaders from a total of 27 countries. It has been an honor and privilege to read their work.

We would like to acknowledge all of the young writers who took the time to research a new culture and write a story, essay, or poem for the Writing for Peace Young Writers Contest with an invitation to participate in our annual Youth Summit in October. Completing this challenge is no small achievement, and we salute your commitment to expanding your knowledge base and developing your craft.

We would also like to thank the teachers and mentors who encouraged their students to take our challenge, and then inspired and guided them to prepare their best work.

First, second and third place winners’ work will be published on August 1st, 2019 in our first online edition of DoveTales, An International Journal of the Arts, themed “One World, One People,” by guest editor Dr. Patricia Jabbeh Wesley.

In Poetry~

First Place: Sharvari Deshpande from Pune, Maharashtra, India, for “In The Valleys of Kashmir.”

Second Place: Emmy Song from Rockville, Maryland, U.S. for “A Walk Down Lafayette Street.”

Third Place: Sarah Street from Atlanta, Georgia, U.S. for “Earth.”

In Fiction~

First Place: Lucas  Tucker from Moraga, California, U.S. for “Cleanse Your Nation.”

Second Place: Sally Liu from Holzheim, Germany, for “7,000 miles.”

Third Place: EbunOluwa Ojebode from Ibadan, Oyo, Nigeria, for “Male ears, Dead End.”

In Nonfiction~

First Place: Christina Wang from Roswell, Georgia, U.S. for “Bringing Gender Back: How the Japanese Youth Connect With Their Culture By Foregoing Gender Norms.”

Second Place: Eunice Lee from Seoul, South Korea, for “When a Mommy Becomes a Nanny.”

Third Place: Junwon Lee from Seoul, South Korea, for “The Small but Mighty Survivors.”

Finalists~

Poetry: Lyndel Cas-ing from Baguio, Philippines, for “Bloom.”

Fiction: Andrea Lee from Mount Laurel, New Jersey, U.S. for “Chains of Greece.”

Nonfiction: Yu Jung Ro from Yeonsu-Gu, South Korea for “Thirty-Nine to Sixty-One.”

Congratulations to one and all!

Copyright © 2019 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

Recharge for Upcoming Writing Deadlines

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Hello fellow Writers for Peace,

I hope you are all enjoying the emerging spring, or conversely (for our friends in the southern hemisphere), the autumn colors. Here in the Rocky Mountains, the melting snow is filling the creek beds with icy whitewater and, after months of cold and snow, the slopes and meadows are greening up. When so much of what is reported by the corporate media is gloom and doom, we can still find hope in the changing colors of the seasons. Even in the concrete cities, nature finds its way into the cracks between slabs of pavement. Take a few moments to appreciate the life that is beyond our small scope and busy days; breathe in the earth’s ever-changing colors and recharge the energy that feeds your creativity. Don’t doubt that this troubled world is more beautiful because of what you bring to it.

I want to remind you of two important Writing for Peace deadlines coming up on June 1st:

Young Writers Contest GuidelinesFirst, is our Young Writers Contest for ages 13-19. Over the seven years we have offered this contest, we have had entries from 26 different countries. It’s an unusual challenge to develop the writers’ tool of empathy, to research and educate oneself on a new culture, the history, politics, even religious traditions and pressures of a region, and write from the perspective of a character within that culture. The challenge is to avoid stereotypes and find the universal commonalities that make us all (as our adviser Patricia Jabbeh Wesley says so beautifully), “one people.”

Please encourage the young writers you know to join their peers and accept this challenge. Let’s hear what this new generation of young writers has to say.

DoveTales, a publication of Writing for PeaceAnd secondly, DoveTales, an International Journal of the Arts, is graduating to a new, more accessible, medium. After six extraordinary print journals, DoveTales is going online. While we traditionalists may miss curling up with the printed book, there’s no denying the advantages of an online journal in reaching a greater audience. Our goal has always been to lift up work by our advisers, new, and emerging writers from across the globe who have something important to add to the collective conversation on resistance, creativity, human rights, cherishing each other and the planet we live on.

Patricia Jabbeh Wesley, Writing for Peace AdviserWe are honored that our Adviser Patricia Jabbeh Wesley has agreed to serve as Guest Editor of our first online edition of DoveTales, launching on August 1st, 2019. Her theme for the  edition is “One World, One People.” The reading period for this journal will close on June 1st, 2019.

So, dear writers and readers, let’s take a deep breath, reach out to each other through the written word, and connect with our inner green earth. There is much work to do, but we’re not alone.

Much love, Carmel

~~~

Carmel-Laughing-1Carmel Mawle is the Founder and President of the Board of Directors for Writing for Peace. She writes from the northern Colorado Rocky Mountains where she lives with her husband and Max, a ten-pound border terrier mix who firmly believes he’s a mountain dog.

Copyright © 2019 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

First Tentative Outline for Future Conversations

Ghandi gentle way quillFirst Tentative Outline for Future Conversations

By Lennart Lundh

I’ve been a pacifist for as long as I can remember, but it wasn’t in keeping with family tradition. Growing up, there were heated arguments at the dinner table. There were threats and physical violence. For a while, I was outcast and homeless. I thought war was, at best, stupid. My father, who built weapons prototypes as part of his daily job, regretted not being able to serve in World War II and Korea. It wasn’t until I came back from Vietnam and talked about what I’d seen, and until I stood against the Navy and refused to return to Vietnam, that an uneasy truce was established.

Dad thought war was necessary because it was the solution to otherwise insoluble problems, while I was focused on war as eternally causing problems. We were both wrong. The Forever War in Afghanistan changed his perspective. The end of “my” war in Southeast Asia changed mine. For both of us, nothing was globally changed by war or its temporary absence.

Don’t get me wrong. My father will cheer the soldiers as they march to another war if he’s convinced there’s a cause worth killing for. I still want to see Chamberlain’s hope to avert war in our time be more than a foolish dream or a bargain with the Devil. Whichever side of the argument we stand on, the progression is what’s confused and stymied us. Whether we fight a war or refuse to take part in one, we can’t achieve some magic Peace on Earth that will automatically be followed by eternal Goodwill towards Men. Quite the opposite. We need to take care of each other first. We must learn to be kind without thinking about it. Only through a culture of Goodwill can we have Peace, or at least a chance of it.

I’m not talking about mastering personal or universal perfection before we can get there. That’s where I think the Christian New Testament goes astray, with its poorly hidden undercurrent of, “Be perfect, or abandon hope.” Even worse, it’s where Thoreau’s one-person social experiment at Walden Pond missed the mark, saying of his neighbor, “I’m perfect. You’re not.” Rather, I’d prefer to be Gandhi-an in approach and attitude: I’m flawed. We’re flawed. But I’m working on it, and a majority of us working together at it the best we can in each moment make it do-able.

Finally (for the moment), is that very human matter of patience. To drag Jim Morrison into this, we want the world, and we want it now. If we can’t have it now, we’ll throw up our arms in frustration and go do something else. On this, too, I recommend Gandhi’s view, as well as Merton’s: It’s anything but easy. It probably won’t happen today, and tomorrow is iffy. I’m seventy this year, so, for me, it might not happen at all. That doesn’t mean I’ll stop trying my best, contributing to the collective effort and future. It means remembering King, keeping his mountain in sight, and having the faith that we can help others reach the summit.

My current, mutable two cents’ worth. What say ye?

Lennart LundhLennart Lundh is a great-grandfather and writer. He served in Vietnam in support of Marine Corps operations in 1968 and 1969, and was discharged as a conscientious objector in 1970.

 

Copyright © 2019 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

 

Every Conversation on Peace Matters: The 2019 Online Youth Summit

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Every Conversation on Peace Matters:
Our 2019 Online Youth Summit

By Mary Carroll-Hackett

In Spring 2014, I had a guest speaker in the two sections of a Writing for Active Citizenship I was teaching, a combat-decorated Marine and Longwood alum, who had asked to speak to my classes about local political engagement. He began his presentation by projecting a large photo, one that had played across the media for months, of the 2013 Egyptian Revolution. Even with the picture filled with images of the Egyptian flag, not a single student in the two sections, not one in forty, could identify what was taking place in the picture.

The next class period, I asked them why they felt that had happened. Their answers covered a range of reasons for what they themselves called disconnect, from not knowing what media to trust, to being too busy surviving their own lives, to the one they all agreed upon: being overwhelmed with the fear and sadness such connection created, overwhelmed in the face of twenty-four hour news coverage which led to what they said paralyzed them most: feeling overwhelmed with helplessness. I asked them how we, as educators, could help with that, how we could help them connect. I asked them What would you most connect to—listen to? Their answer: our peers. They all said they wanted two things in support of creating such a personal global connection: to hear from “people who look like us, our age,” and to learn about real, doable actions they could make in their daily lives, as both a way to help those who needed it across the planet, and as a way to combat their own feelings of helplessness.

This is how the Writing for Peace Online Youth Summit came into being.
As we prepare for the third annual summit, to take place Saturday, October 12, 2019, we are more committed than ever to honoring what those young people seek, and to both take and create every opportunity we can to advance conversations that will move us all toward more understanding and compassion.

This year, we are particularly focusing on the What Can We Do question posed by the young people with whom we’ve spoken. Our 2019 keynotes are all young activists who have been working for real change on the front-lines of their communities, and who have been engaged in this way since they were very young. They exemplify the power and effect young people can have in their own communities, and the vision of leaders who, rather than a future preying on fear and dividing us, will work, as they already are, to build community where we care and support each other.

Taikein Cooper 2019 PhotoTaikein Cooper was canvassing throughout Virginia’s communities as an 11-year-old to help elect his D.A.R.E (Drug Abuse Resistance Education) teacher, Travis Harris, as Prince Edward County’s Sheriff, beginning the life of service he now lives, in local and regional politics and service initiatives, and as Executive Director of Virginia Excels, an education advocacy organization that focuses on educational equity by amplifying the voices of students and families. He also co-hosts the socio-political podcast, Ain’t No Free Lunch, with Ms. Danielle Greene.

Hazel Edwards 2019 PhotoHazel Edwards is an artist, community advocate and educator, who works as The Educator and Outreach Specialist in The Bryson Institute of The Attic Youth Center in Philadelphia. Among numerous other advocacy projects, Hazel has presented and led workshops in Philadelphia and across the country for hundreds of service providers and youth on gender, sexuality, racism, and antioppression. She also co-facilitated a 9-month high school social justice internship, where she taught 18 interns on systems of oppression and organizing skills. In 2016, Hazel was instrumental in co-authoring the School District of Philadelphia’s Policy 252, which created protections for transgender and gender nonconforming students.

Jason Tsai 2019 photoJason Tsai, a young leader dedicated to working in support of food access, especially in urban food deserts, has worked as an urban agriculture fellow and food distribution coordinator at Tricycle Urban Ag, in Richmond, Virginia. There, he worked on urban farms to grow and distribute organic produce through corner store partners for food desert communities. He specializes in the art of making “good” food that is responsible to the soul and to the earth.

Marni von Wilpert 2019 PhotoMarni von Wilpert, a young attorney originally from San Diego, served in the Peace Corps in Botswana, Africa from 2006 to 2008, working on treatment, prevention, and care for children and adults living with HIV/AIDS, then went on as one of 28 young legal professionals nationwide to be awarded the Skadden Fellowship for Public Interest law, where she worked with the Mississippi Center for Justice to create the first HIV-related civil rights law practice in the state to provide free legal services to people living with HIV/AIDS facing discrimination in employment, housing, and access to healthcare. Marni also worked as an Associate Labor Counsel for the Economic Policy Institute in Washington, D.C., monitoring and evaluating federal and state legislation and regulations affecting workers’ rights, wages and working conditions. Marni moved back home to San Diego in 2017 and now works as a Deputy City Attorney in the Civil Litigation Division of the San Diego City Attorney’s Office. She is a graduate of Emerge California and is running for San Diego City Council in the 2020 election cycle.

Each of these amazing people have stories to tell of their own activist journeys, as well as wisdom, experience, and advice to offer to our summit participants, on how each of us can work toward change, toward, justice, toward peace, in our own communities, in our daily lives.

In addition to the keynotes, we’re inviting submissions of creative work from all over the world, and especially interested in multilingual work, on any topic creatively exploring working toward peace in daily ways.

This year’s summit, with its conversations on the power of individual, community, and grassroots activism, exploring what we as individuals can do in our day to day lives to work toward the peace we all desire and deserve, reminds us: One person can make a difference. Together, we can change the world. We sincerely hope you’ll join us.

Mary Carroll-Hackett, Writing for Peace Adviser2Mary Carroll-Hackett is an adviser and member of the Writing for Peace Board of Directors, and the author of The Real Politics of LipstickAnimal Soul, If We Could Know Our Bones, The Night I Heard Everything, Trailer Park Oracle, and A Little Blood, A Little Rain. Her newest collection of prose poems, Death for Beginners, will be out from Kelsey Books in September 2017. Learn more about Writing for Peace Adviser Mary Carroll-Hackett and her work here.

Copyright © 2019 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

2019 Announcements

41716478_541593026272917_3315322037882322944_n (2)Hello friends,

We have some big changes to tell you about! Our Board of Directors is working to make Writing for Peace more accessible to readers all over the globe and whittle away at geographic and language barriers. Coming highlights include:

DoveTales, An International Journal of the Arts

Writing for Peace has published six beautiful print journals, but in 2019, DoveTales is going online. We will publish two issues per year, February 1st and August 1st. You can find the Guidelines here.

2019 Youth Summit

We are inviting translations this year, and working to achieve multilingual participation. The theme for this year’s Youth Summit is “Day By Day, Hand in Hand: Seeing & Creating Peace in Daily Action.” The online event will be held on Saturday, October 12, 2019, 8am-6pm EST and is limited to 50 participants. Submissions must be received by September 15th, 2019. Learn more, here.

2019 Young Writers Contest

Our Young Writers contest is up and running! Winners will be published on August 1st, 2019, in our first online DoveTales, guest edited by Writing for Peace Adviser Patricia Jabbeh Wesley. Check out the Contest Guidelines here.

You’ll see lots of other changes this year, and we’ll keep you apprised of developments along the way. We’re looking forward to sharing an exciting 2019 with you!

Yours in peace,

Carmel

Carmel Mawle is president and founder of Writing for Peace. She writes from the northern Colorado Rocky Mountains where she lives with her husband and Max, a ten-pound border terrier mix who firmly believes he’s a mountain dog. You can find her blog at www.carmelmawle.com.

Copyright © 2019 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

The Giving Season

“Through education and creative writing, Writing for Peace seeks to cultivate the empathy that allows minds to open to new cultural views, to value the differences as well as the hopes and dreams that unite all of humanity, to develop a spirit of leadership and peaceful activism.”

~Writing for Peace Mission Statement

Carmel-Laughing-1It’s almost December, the “Giving Season,” and I’m consumed with which size Legos I should buy for my 4-year-old grandson, all my grandchildren’s ever-changing clothing sizes, and what to get for the older males on my list who seem to already have everything I can think of. A gift certificate to one of the chain restaurants? Belly-dancing lessons?

The looming specter of December 31st brings out the flip-side of this month of giving – the asking.  My inbox is full of requests from nonprofit organizations, many of them desperate for the funds to continue much needed services, or to begin life-changing programs.

I’ve worked for three 501c3 nonprofits, and have always struggled to ask for financial help. When I was director of a youth orchestra, we were fortunate to have an extensive donor list. My job was to remind them of the many benefits of music for developing minds, the increased college acceptances and scholarship rates, the services and opportunities we provided to our musicians, and the cost of these programs, which didn’t come close to what we brought in through student tuition income. I wrote the letters and program asks from the bottom of my heart, and even occasionally stood on a stage and made the appeal directly, a task I absolutely dreaded. But this is the nature of running a nonprofit, and I did it because I believed we were making a difference in the lives of those young people, and our community as a whole. That was true when I was president of a chamber music association and, even more so, true today with Writing for Peace.

Because I see first hand what our need is, Writing for Peace is at the top of my husband’s and my giving list. There are other important causes we divvy out our end-of-the-year donations to (Doctor’s Without Borders among them), but the Writing for Peace mission seems imperative to me. If we can’t afford the latest super-cool sneakers for our grandchildren, maybe we can leave them a world that is a little bit kinder.

So, yes, despite my aversion to “the ask,” I’m doing it today because I know what depends on it. I owe it to our young writers, and all of our Writing for Peace family, to do what has always been difficult for me.

Our administration is board operated, and all directors and advisers work on a volunteer basis, so 100% of contributions go to support our mission. Writing for Peace is a 501c3 nonprofit corporation, Federal Tax ID Number, 45-2968027. You can donate directly here.

If you are able to set a little aside for Writing for Peace, thank you. And, whether you’re able to contribute financially, or not, we appreciate all you do for us, for each other, and for a better world.

Wishing you and yours joy this holiday season.

With love and appreciation,

Carmel

Carmel Mawle is president and founder of Writing for Peace. She writes from the northern Colorado Rocky Mountains where she lives with her husband and Max, a ten-pound border terrier mix who firmly believes he’s a mountain dog. You can find her blog at www.carmelmawle.com.

Copyright © 2018 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.