Category Archives: Daily PAW Post contributor

Alabanza: In Praise of Local 100, by Martín Espada

By Martín Espada

Alabanza: In Praise of Local 100
            for the 43 members of Hotel Employees and Restaurant Employees
            Local 100, working at the Windows on the World restaurant,
            who lost their lives in the attack on the World Trade Center

Alabanza. Praise the cook with a shaven head
and a tattoo on his shoulder that said Oye,
a blue-eyed Puerto Rican with people from Fajardo,
the harbor of pirates centuries ago.
Praise the lighthouse in Fajardo, candle
glimmering white to worship the dark saint of the sea.
Alabanza.
Praise the cook’s yellow Pirates cap
worn in the name of Roberto Clemente, his plane
that flamed into the ocean loaded with cans for Nicaragua,
for all the mouths chewing the ash of earthquakes.
Alabanza.Praise the kitchen radio, dial clicked
even before the dial on the oven, so that music and Spanish
rose before bread. Praise the bread. Alabanza.

Praise Manhattan from a hundred and seven flights up,
like Atlantis glimpsed through the windows of an ancient aquarium.
Praise the great windows where immigrants from the kitchen
could squint and almost see their world, hear the chant of nations:
Ecuador, México, República Dominicana,
Haiti, Yemen, Ghana, Bangladesh.
Alabanza. Praise the kitchen in the morning,
where the gas burned blue on every stove
and exhaust fans fired their diminutive propellers,
hands cracked eggs with quick thumbs
or sliced open cartons to build an altar of cans.
Alabanza. Praise the busboy’s music, the chime-chime
of his dishes and silverware in the tub.
 
Alabanza. Praise the dish-dog, the dishwasher
who worked that morning because another dishwasher
could not stop coughing, or because he needed overtime
to pile the sacks of rice and beans for a family
floating away on some Caribbean island plagued by frogs.
Alabanza. Praise the waitress who heard the radio in the kitchen
and sang to herself about a man gone. Alabanza.

After the thunder wilder than thunder,
after the shudder deep in the glass of the great windows,
after the radio stopped singing like a tree full of terrified frogs,
after night burst the dam of day and flooded the kitchen,
for a time the stoves glowed in darkness like the lighthouse in Fajardo,
like a cook’s soul. Soul I say, even if the dead cannot tell us
about the bristles of God’s beard because God has no face,
soul I say, to name the smoke-beings flung in constellations
across the night sky of this city and cities to come.
Alabanza I say, even if God has no face.

Alabanza. When the war began, from Manhattan and Kabul
two constellations of smoke rose and drifted to each other,
mingling in icy air, and one said with an Afghan tongue:
Teach me to dance. We have no music here.
And the other said with a Spanish tongue:
I will teach you. Music is all we have.

“Alabanza” was first published in *The Nation Books* anthology, Poets Against the War. “Alabanza” was contributed by Martín Espada in honor of the tenth anniversary of Poets Against the War and the movement’s founder, Sam Hamill, and is reprinted today in memory of the many tragedies of 9/11.

About Martín Espada

Martin Espada, Writing for Peace Daily PAW Post Guest PoetCalled “the Latino poet of his generation,” Martín Espada was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1957. He has published more than fifteen books as a poet, editor, essayist and translator. His latest collection of poems, The Trouble Ball (Norton, 2011), is the recipient of the Milt Kessler Award, a Massachusetts Book Award and an International Latino Book Award. The Republic of Poetry, a collection published by Norton in 2006, received the Paterson Award for Sustained Literary Achievement and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. A previous book of poems, Imagine the Angels of Bread (Norton, 1996), won an American Book Award and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. Other books of poems include A Mayan Astronomer in Hell’s Kitchen (Norton, 2000), City of Coughing and Dead Radiators (Norton, 1993), and Rebellion is the Circle of a Lover’s Hands (Curbstone, 1990).  He has received such recognition as the Robert Creeley Award, the National Hispanic Cultural Center Literary Award, the PEN/Revson Fellowship and a Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship.  His work has been widely translated; collections of poems have been published in Spain, Puerto Rico and Chile. His book of essays, Zapata’s Disciple (South End Press, 1998), has been banned in Tucson as part of the Mexican-American Studies Program outlawed by the state of Arizona. A graduate of Northeastern University Law School and a former tenant lawyer, Espada is currently a professor in the Department of English at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst.

Learn more about Martín Espada’s work here.

 

Writing for PeaceWriting for Peace News

Congratulations To Our New Young Advisers

Writing for Peace is pleased to introduce two remarkable young peace activists, the founding members of our new panel of Young Advisers. Both have shown an extraordinary commitment to peace. Check their pages and watch our blog for their inspirational posts.

Natan Blanc, Writing for Peace Young AdviserNatan Blanc is an Israeli who refused to serve in the IDF (Israeli army) “because of its actions against the Palestinians living in Gaza and the West Bank.” Natan held fast to his convictions, despite being jailed ten times.

Lyla June Johnston, Writing for Peace Young AdviserLyla June Johnston is a Navajo poet and peace activist from Taos, New Mexico, who has found her home in the service of humanity.

Writing for Peace is accepting nominations of young activists, writers, and artists, for our new panel of Young Advisers. Please send nominations by email, along with the reasons for your nomination and contact information to editor@writingforpeace.org, subject heading: Young Adviser Nominations.

2014 Young Writers Contest

Writing for Peace Young Writers' ContestThe Writing for Peace 2014 Young Writers Contest deadline is March 1st, 2014. Our prestigious Judges Panel includes Robin Black, fiction; Dinty W. Moore, nonfiction; and David Mason, poetry. Submission guidelines here.

 DoveTales, a publication of Writing for PeaceDoveTales Call for Submissions

Writing for Peace is accepting submissions for our 2014 Issue of DoveTales, an International Journal of the Arts. The theme of our second journal is contrast. Check out our submission guidelines here.

Support Writing for Peace

DoveTales, an International Journal of the Arts, "Occupied" 2013Help us reach out to schools and young writers by purchasing a copy of DoveTales, an International Journal of the Arts to gift to your local high school or junior high. Let us know you are gifting your copy, and we’ll include extra bookmarks (beautifully designed by artist-in-residence, PdLietz). Purchase our 2013 “Occupied” Issue here.

Copyright © 2013 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

A Tribute to Sam Hamill, by Martín Espada

Sam Hamill, Writing for Peace AdviserCommemorating Ten Years of Poetic Resistance, PAW Post No. 28

Writing for Peace  commemorates the Tenth Anniversary of Poets Against the War with Daily PAW Posts from a host of contributors. 

*Parental Guidance Warning –The poets featured during our February Daily PAW Posts write of war and its effect on the human heart. Writing for Peace has not censored these poems, and we encourage parents to review the content before sharing them with children.

To purchase a copy of POETS AGAINST THE WAR from Powell’s independent bookstore, click here.

Small Writing for Peace logo

Our final post is from Martín Espada, who shares his tribute to Sam Hamill and Poets Against the War, originally given at the 2012 Split This Rock Festival in Washington, D.C. on March 22nd, 2012.

Martín Espada

I am honored to speak today at this tribute to Sam Hamill and Poets Against War.

Poetry saved Sam Hamill. Poetry saved him from a life of violence, self-destruction and incarceration.  This poem is dedicated to him.
Blasphemy
          For Sam Hamill

Let the blasphemy be spoken: poetry can save us,
not the way a fisherman pulls the drowning swimmer
into his boat, not the way Jesus, between screams,
promised life everlasting to the thief crucified beside him
on the hill, but salvation nevertheless.

Somewhere a convict sobs into a book of poems
from the prison library, and I know why
his hands are careful not to break the brittle pages.

 

Allow me to introduce Sam Hamill.

Sam was born in 1942 or 1943 to unknown parents.  Adopted and raised in Utah, he was beaten and abused, a runaway, a petty thief, in trouble with the law, in and out of jail.

In the moving poem, “Plain Dumb Luck,” he writes of being “huddled in a cell in Fredonia, Arizona/ rolling cigarettes from a Bull Durham pouch/ locked up for the crime of being fourteen and homeless.”  A sheriff tells him to “Go home, son,” but “Home was the road/ for a kid whose other home was hell./ I’d rather steal than taste that belt again./ I stole.”

And yet, by poem’s end, forty years later, the poet concludes that he is “the luckiest son-of-a-bitch alive.” It was his “dumb luck” to discover poetry.  From the practice of poetry everything else would flow.

At City Lights bookstore in San Francisco, there was more “dumb luck:” a serendipitous encounter with poet, translator and critic Kenneth Rexroth, who would become Sam’s first mentor.  As Sam recalls:

I was fifteen years old, and I was smoking a lot of heroin and trying to be cool, man, and I really loved poetry. And Kenneth convinced me that destroying myself was not really the best possible solution, and that I needed to look at the world’s literature, and not just my own life, in order to be hip, if you will. So he had a huge influence on what became of me thereafter.

What became of Sam Hamill?

In the words of Hayden Carruth, “No one—I mean no one—has done the momentous work of presenting poetry better than Sam Hamill. His editing and publishing, his criticism and translations, his own very strong and beautiful poems have been making a difference in American culture for many years. What a wealth of accomplishment!”

Sam has published over 40 books. His collections of poetry include Destination Zero, Gratitude, Dumb Luck, Measured by Stone, and Almost Paradise.  His essay collections include A Poet’s Work and Avocations. He taught himself classical Chinese and Japanese, and is the leading translator of poetry from these ancient languages. His translations include Narrow Road to the Interior and Other Writings of Basho, Crossing the Yellow River, The Poetry of Zen, and the Tao Te Ching.

He has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Woodrow Wilson Foundation, and the Mellon Fund. In 1973, he co-founded the legendary Copper Canyon Press, serving as editor there for more than thirty years, publishing Rexroth, Carruth, McGrath, the posthumous works of Neruda.

When Sam began his Zen practice and declared himself a conscientious objector, he took a “bodhisattva vow” to become a peacemaker. (Sam is a tough pacifist. I used to tell him that he put the “fist” in “pacifist.”)

Small wonder, then, that Sam felt  (and I quote) “overcome by nausea” when he was invited to participate in a White House symposium called, “Poetry and the American Voice,” hosted by First Lady Laura Bush. The symposium, set for February 2003, was cancelled when word got out of Sam’s plan to gather anti-war poems for presentation to the First Lady.

Never tell Sam: Don’t say that. He fought back by founding Poets Against the War. PAW collected, posted and archived more than 20,000 poems and statements against war. As Sam puts it, “Never before in recorded history have so many poets spoken in a single chorus.” He also edited the anthology Poets Against the War, published by The Nation Books.

In the foreword to that extraordinary anthology, Sam Hamill writes:

Can (thousands of) poems inhibit this or any administration planning a war? It is only one step among many. But it is an important step, as each is. We join physicians against the war, teachers against the war, farmers against the war, and others. Poets Against the War helped bring about hundreds of poetry readings and discussions around the world while compiling a document of historic proportion. And when our critics on the right suggest that poetry might somehow divorce itself from politics, we say, ‘Read the Greeks, read the classical Chinese; tell it to Dante, Chaucer, Milton or Longfellow. Tell it to Whitman, Dickinson or Hughes. Tell it to García Lorca, to Joseph Brodsky or to the Chinese poets living in exile in our country…A government is a government of words, and when those words are used to mislead, to instill fear or to invite silence, it is the duty of every poet to speak fearlessly and clearly.

Albert Camus writes: “henceforth, the only honorable course will be to stake everything on a formidable gamble: that words are more powerful than munitions. Sam Hamill has become the living embodiment of this principle. He and PAW defined a culture of conscience in this country. When future generations want to know the truth of these times, they will not turn to Colin Powell’s testimony at the United Nations. They will turn to the words of Sam Hamill. They will read Poets Against the War.

Sam is a true visionary. He sees through ancient eyes, “fearlessly and clearly.”  His translation of the poem, “Song of the War Wagons” by Tu Fu, written in China more than 1200 years ago, speaks to us of war today:

We’ve shed a sea of blood.
Still the emperor wants more.
East of the mountains, a thousand villages,
ten thousand villages, turn to bitter weeds…
Our boys lie under the weeds.
Being right is necessary but not sufficient.  In 2003, when he founded PAW, Sam was right about the “sea of blood” and the “emperor” who wanted more; but he also had the integrity to take action, regardless of consequences. Ultimately, Sam Hamill is the kind of visionary who rolls up his sleeves and gets to work.  This is from his poem, “Ars Poetica:”

  
 We go down to the sea and set sail
 For a world beyond war,
       knowing
 we will never find it.
       We are not heroes.
 We sail The Justice and The Mercy
 because these boats need rowing.

The time has come for us to stand up and express our gratitude for all that rowing.  Please welcome my compañero, my hero, Sam Hamill.

*********

Writing for Peace applauds each of the poets who shared their anti-war poems with us this month, every poet who took part in the PAW resistance of 2003, and especially our adviser Sam Hamill, whose moral courage continues to challenge us to search for understanding and stand for truth.

 

Martin Espada, Writing for Peace Daily PAW Post Guest PoetAbout Martín Espada

Called “the Latino poet of his generation,” Martín Espada was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1957. He has published more than fifteen books as a poet, editor, essayist and translator. His latest collection of poems, The Trouble Ball (Norton, 2011), is the recipient of the Milt Kessler Award, a Massachusetts Book Award and an International Latino Book Award. The Republic of Poetry, a collection published by Norton in 2006, received the Paterson Award for Sustained Literary Achievement and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. A previous book of poems, Imagine the Angels of Bread (Norton, 1996), won an American Book Award and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. Other books of poems include A Mayan Astronomer in Hell’s Kitchen (Norton, 2000), City of Coughing and Dead Radiators (Norton, 1993), and Rebellion is the Circle of a Lover’s Hands (Curbstone, 1990).  He has received such recognition as the Robert Creeley Award, the National Hispanic Cultural Center Literary Award, the PEN/Revson Fellowship and a Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship.  His work has been widely translated; collections of poems have been published in Spain, Puerto Rico and Chile. His book of essays, Zapata’s Disciple (South End Press, 1998), has been banned in Tucson as part of the Mexican-American Studies Program outlawed by the state of Arizona. A graduate of Northeastern University Law School and a former tenant lawyer, Espada is currently a professor in the Department of English at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst.

Learn more about Martin Espada’s work here.

 

Writing for Peace News:

During the month of February, Writing for Peace has offered a post each day in honor of the Tenth Anniversary of Poets Against the War. We hope all our readers have been as moved and inspired by these poets as we have.

In March, our focus will shift toward other aspects of peace, as we take a step back from the inflammatory debate about reducing gun violence and explore the issue through poetry, essays and fiction. We won’t continue the rigorous posting schedule of February, but you can continue to count on us for two to three posts per week.

2013 Young Writers Contest

The 2013 Young Writers Contest closes at midnight, Mountain Standard Time on March 1st.  Announcements will be made through our blog on May 1st 2013.  Contest guidelines are posted here.

DoveTales Update!

We’ve already extended our release date twice, and we’re going to do it once more (knocking on wood).  The print copies of DoveTales, an International Journal of the Arts will be out by the end of March. E-books will likely be offered sometime before that. We beg your continued patience, and assure you it will be worth the wait. Our first issue is absolutely beautiful!

Thank you for your support, and continue to check in with us here for news about DoveTales.

 

Copyright © 2013 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Veronica Golos Interviews Sam Hamill (Part II)

Sam Hamill, Writing for Peace AdviserCommemorating Ten Years of Poetic Resistance, PAW Post No. 27

Writing for Peace  commemorates the Tenth Anniversary of Poets Against the War with Daily PAW Posts from a host of contributors.

*Parental Guidance Warning –The poets featured during our February Daily PAW Posts write of war and its effect on the human heart. Writing for Peace has not censored these poems, and we encourage parents to review the content before sharing them with children.

To purchase a copy of POETS AGAINST THE WAR from Powell’s independent bookstore, click here.

Small Writing for Peace logoIn this special interview, Veronica Golos talks with Sam Hamill about the role of poetry, living reality, and love.

(Part Two of Two)

 Veronica Golos:

I’ve just finished reading an interview with you by Lisa Morphew, in the Ashville Poetry Review, Vol. 19, No. 1, 2012, Issue 22.  It is very personal, and you answered willingly and at length about your past, about the era into which you came to manhood.  It seemed a tribute to Kenneth Rexroth actually.  He spoke against, as you quote, “a society which grows daily more depraved and destructive…the poet is always called upon to play his role of prophet, in the Biblical sense, whatever else he may be about.”

I was struck by the intimacy of the interview, especially questions about your relationship to your late wife, Gray.  I bring this up, because your poem, Visitation, published in the inaugural issue of the Taos Journal of Poetry & Art, of which I am co-edited, has haunted me.  There is such vitality to your voice, such subdued passion, and here in this poem, it seems to me, such a delicate touch, a very Japanese feel to it.  If I may quote it:

 Visitation

I wake suddenly, in the middle of the night,
and realize I’m stroking the pillow beside me,
dreaming of my wife who is six months dead.

I rise and brush my teeth and pour a stiff drink
and go out into the garden to sit
on the old iron bench and think.

It’s after midnight and the moon is full.
And after a long silence, I hear, faintly,
a woman’s heels’ chink, chink, chink,

against the ancient cobblestone
beyond the garden wall
as she makes her way down the street.

In the Asheville Poetry Review interview, you also say the Bodhisattva, “perceives the cries of the world.”

I’d like to pull these together – this deep and abiding speaking as a social “prophet,” as one who hears the cries of the world, and a writer of such a love poem, full of absence and grief.

Sam Hamill:

How can we actually learn what love is without learning to fully love this earth on which we stand?

 
I think of W.C. Williams writing in The Wedge that “everything is about the war,” and that he as a poet is simply working in a different sector of the field. Every serious poet, consciously or otherwise, is composing his or her own cosmology. Opening the heart to the truth of experience and engaged imagination, one is “given” the poem via his or her Muse and must compose him/herself via deep listening in order to transform the gift of inspiration into the artifact, the experience, of the poetry. Master K’ung reminds us that emotions are, of themselves, neither good nor bad, (we all have them), but what we make of them matters most. I think anger (not rage) can be a motivator to overcome injustice and cruelty. Even the murderers and torturers are human, misguided in their actions and misunderstanding “reality.” And yet murderers and torturers must be brought to justice.

I could go on at length about what Williams (and Olson & Creeley & Levertov & Duncan) mean about “field composition,” but that would require a whole essay. Suffice to say that “organic poetry” is a means of opening the heart while upholding the deepest values of our lives. The real value of poetry, to me at least, lies in the ways in which poems—my own and many others’— shape and inform, revolutionizes, my life. My *whole* life. I don’t, for instance, enter contests, the beauty pageants of the poetry community. One of my great masters, Tu Fu, died an unknown poet. Two centuries later he was recognized as one of China’s greatest poets ever. It’s not about recognition or popularity contests. It is simply a way of life… I am given poems to compose and I compose by listening to what speaks to my heart and ear. The voices and melos are a plenitude of wisdom and beauty. As Gary Snyder said long ago, “As a poet, I hold the most archaic values on earth.” Being, the Buddha observed, is agonizing or suffering. Poetry is one of the ten thousand paths to the Buddha; through poetry (as various as that word may be), we may find self-realization and do away with the “I-and-thou” and competitive mind-set that makes war possible (as well as poetry contests) and we come into a world of only “we,” we-are-oneness” in our struggle in this sentient interdependent world. To value life requires valuing the cosmos that makes life possible. How can we actually learn what love is without learning to fully love this earth on which we stand? —The very dirt and stone of it. We must protect it from capitalism just as we must protect those who suffer most from organized oppression. We must love and resist and rebel.

 

Sources:

Ashville Poetry Review, Vol 19, no. 1, 2012, Issue 22

The Progressive, Interview by Anne-Marie Cusac, Apirl 2003, www.progressive.org/mag_cusachamill

Paul e Nelson, http://paulemelson.com/organic-poetry/why-poetry-matters-sam

Poet Reflects on 30 Years of Publishing Poetry    www.kearneyhub.com/content/tncms/live/

Poets Against the War  2006  http://poieinkaiprattein.org/poetry/poiein-kai-prattein-and-the-poets

A Monks Tale, by Sam Hamill

EYES WIDE OPEN  www.rattle.com/poetry/2011/03/eyes-wide-open-by-sam-hamill

Poems, by Sam Hamill    www.lorenwebster.net/In_a_Dark_Time/category/poets/sam hamill

An E-view with Sam Hamill by Rebecca Seiferle, The Drunken Boat   www.thedrunkenboat.com/hamillview.thm

Veronica Golos, Writing for Peace Advisor

About Writing for Peace Adviser, Veronica Golos

Veronica Golos is the author of two books, Vocabulary of Silence (Red Hen Press, 2011), winner of the 2011 New Mexico Book Award, poems from which are translated into Arabic by poet Nizar Sartawi, and A Bell Buried Deep (Storyline Press, 2004), co-winner of the 16th Annual Nicholas Roerich Poetry Prize, nominated for a Pushcart Prize by Edward Hirsch, and adapted for stage and performed at Claremont School of Theology, Claremont, CA.  A Bell Buried Deep is set to be re-issued by Tupelo Press, with an introduction by Patricia Smith, in 2014.

Golos’s poems are included in The Poet’s CraftAnnie Finch, Editor, 2012, University of Michigan Press; Collecting Life: Poets on Objects Known and Imagined, 3: A Taos Press, 2011, and in journals including Spillway, Meridians, Drunken Boat, Orion, Cimarron, Contemporary World Literature, Sin Fronteras, Verso (Paris), Poetry (London), Rattle, World Literature Magazine Spring’s Forum. Translated Poems from Vocabulary of Silence have appeared in over 24 journals and publications throughout the Middle East including (Syria), www.nabee.awatf.com,  www.saddana.com, (UAE),www.shenrayar.com/ar, (Iraq)  www.Alimbaratur.com (Denmark) and Maqal (Kuwait).

Golos is Acquisitions Editor for 3:A Taos Press, and co-editor of the Taos Journal of Poetry & Art.

 

Sam Hamill, Writing for Peace Advisor

About Writing for Peace Adviser, Sam Hamill

Sam Hamill is the author of more than forty books, including fifteen volumes of original poetry (most recently Measured by Stone and Almost Paradise: New & Selected Poems & Translations); four collections of literary essays, including A Poet’s Work and Avocations: On Poetry & Poets; and some of the most distinguished translations of ancient Chinese and Japanese classics of the last half-century. He co-founded, and for thirty-two years was editor at, Copper Canyon Press. He taught in prisons for fourteen years and has worked extensively with battered women and children. An outspoken political pacifist, in 2003, declining an invitation to the White House, he founded Poets Against War, compiling the largest single-theme poetry anthology in history, 30,000 poems by 26,000 poets. He has been awarded fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Guggenheim Foundation, the Woodrow Wilson Foundation, the Mellon Fund, and the Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission; other honors include the Stanley Lindberg Lifetime Achievement Award for Editing, the Washington Poets’ Association Lifetime Achievement in Poetry Award, two Washington Governor’s Arts Awards, a Western States Book Award, a PEN-Oakland Anti-censorship Award, a PEN Center/USA First Amendment Award, the Charity Randall Award from The Poetry Forum, and the Condecoración de la Universidad de Carabobo in Valencia, Venezuela. His work has been translated into a dozen languages. He lives in Anacortes, Washington.

February Writing for Peace News:

All during the month of February, Writing for Peace is commemorating the Tenth Anniversary of Poets Against the War with a Daily PAW Post. If you are interested in arranging a reading this month in honor of Poets Against the War, please contact us with the details at editor@writingforpeace.org, and we will be happy to share your information on our site.

2013 Young Writers Contest

Contest Deadline is March 1st! The Writing for Peace Young Writers Contest is in full swing, with entries coming in from all over the globe.  The contest is open to writers of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction, for ages 13 to 19. Spread the word to young writers everywhere! You’ll find contest guidelines here.

DoveTales,  An International Journal of the Arts

The first issue of DoveTales will be released this month, featuring poets, writers, artists and photographers from all over the world.  We are also looking forward to seeing the winners of our 2012 Young Writers Contest in print. Watch our posts for news of the journal’s release. The new submission guidelines will go up on March 1st. Thank you for your support!

 

 

Copyright © 2013 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

Veronica Golos Interviews Sam Hamill (Part I)

Sam Hamill, Writing for Peace AdviserCommemorating Ten Years of Poetic Resistance, PAW Post No. 26

During the month of February, Writing for Peace  commemorates the Tenth Anniversary of Poets Against the War with Daily PAW Posts from a host of contributors.

*Parental Guidance Warning –The poets featured during our February Daily PAW Posts write of war and its effect on the human heart. Writing for Peace has not censored these poems, and we encourage parents to review the content before sharing them with children.

To purchase a copy of POETS AGAINST THE WAR from Powell’s independent bookstore, click here.

Small Writing for Peace logo

  In this special interview, Veronica Golos talks with Sam Hamill about the role of poetry, living reality, and love.

(Part One of Two)

 

Veronica Golos:

Well, I feel as though I do know you — one of the many benefits of Face Book.  We share many of the same views on a whole host of topics, including, I believe, the role of poetry.  The role of poetry especially for “American’ writers.

I thought we might begin with a quote from Camus, one you used in an article.

Camus reminds us that if art ‘adapts itself to what the majority of our society wants, art will be a meaningless recreation. If it blindly rejects that society, if the artist makes up his (sic) mind to take refuge in his dreams, art will express nothing but a negation. In this way we shall have the production of entertainers or of formal grammarians, and in both cases this leads to an art cut off from living reality.

Did or does PAW prove that in fact there is an “American” art NOT cut off from living reality?  For my own recent poetry book, Vocabulary of Silence, I read a great deal of translated Arab poetry, and certainly so much of their poetry is part and parcel of their living reality. An awareness of the world and a response to it.

May we start here, and I’ll pick up questions from your reply?
Sam Hamill:

Living reality is learning the names of children bombed from drones, remembering the heroes who exposed this country’s war crimes, war crimes that continue day by day. 

26,000 poets writing almost exclusively in American idiom suggests that the poetry of engagement is alive in this country. What is the general political reality? That our poetry would make no difference in the political arena except as agitation. We were a “liberal minority” in a country that has loved and profited from war from Day One.

Nevertheless, many of the nightmares predicted in the poetry became reality on the ground. I was granted five minutes of fame, not for organizing against the war, but for embarrassing the White House. Our major media asked questions worthy of a bright third grade student —”Is it poetry if it doesn’t rhyme?” “Do you think a poem can stop a war?” “If your poetry doesn’t change anything, why write it at all?” I was subjected to ad hominem attacks in the op/ed pages of the NY Times and the Wall St Journal, in both instances by former Nixon speech writers, telling me that I was a nobody. The fact remains: Poets Against War was an effective call to resistance. And while we couldn’t stop the attack, we helped turn the tide of American opinion against the slaughter. But the slaughter continues in new incarnations. Living reality is learning the names of children bombed from drones, remembering the heroes who exposed this country’s war crimes, war crimes that continue day by day.
 Veronica Golos:

I’ve been reading some of the really excellent interviews (there are so many) with you.  In all of them, you offer an affirmation of poetry, an affirmation that poetry matters.  Of course, as an author of over 40 books and translations, teaching in prisons, continuing the PAW, and your keen awareness of the present state of the world, you have viewed both poetry and the world for a long time.

In your interview with Paul E. Nelson, you are quoted: “In order to transcend a materialist culture we have to have spiritual values.  We have to have a spiritual economy, an economy of the soul. Poetry is part of that commerce.  It lives outside the mainstream economy.”

Could you elaborate on this?  Especially in light of these continued and ever expanding US wars, of which you speak so eloquently and forcefully?

Could you give us examples of how your Zen practice, and the righteous anger you express, combine in your poetry?
Sam Hamill:

The poem is ultimately a gift, a bestowal. It’s an investment in human character. 

Poetry begins with the gift of inspiration—drawing in the breath of one’s Muse to become pregnant with meaning; that “meaning” is transformed into the energy of poetry through insight and craft in order to become the poem. The poem is then given away on the breath of the poet. This transference and transformation of energy and insight then becomes inspiration for the next listener who also passes it along. The poem is ultimately a gift, a bestowal. It’s an investment in human character.

I have lived my life in accord with what the Chinese call san chiao, the “three systems of thought” that include the sometimes seemingly conflicting teachings of Confucianism, Taoism and Buddhism. Lao Tzu tells us that “no name names the name” of the Tao, that words have limits and understanding Tao lies beyond words. Master K’ung teaches us that “all wisdom is rooted in learning to call things by their right names.” Buddhism teaches us to practice compassion and right mindfulness in a world in which “being is agonizing,” and that we already have within us our own awakening. I take these fundamental teachings not as religion, but as applied practical existential philosophy. Lao Tzu says, “You find yourself by serving others.” My primary service has been to poetry, to the life of poetry— as poet, as editor, as translator. Buddhists say, “There are ten thousand paths to the Buddha.” Poetry is one of those paths.

We live in a house that is burning down around us. Corporate capitalism has no spiritual values. We call our country and ourselves “exceptional,” and divorce ourselves from the suffering we inflict all around us. Our leadership needs a “they” to create fear, some “other” that is threatening us even as we manufacture the threats as we did with Iraq. But there is no “they.” There is only a “we,” as in human being, and our violence turns back on us constantly. When a house is burning down, you can’t sit idly by and claim to be working on your own spiritual advancement. You must act to put out the fire and try to save lives. The Bodhisattva “perceives the cries of the world,” and refuses to enter nirvana until all sentient beings become enlightened. His or her actions begin in compassion for those who suffer the most, but extend ultimately even to those who are murderers and the accomplices of murderers. I think of the courage of Albert Camus who pleaded against the death penalty even for war criminals. Every day we see our language corrupted by our political class, we read of drones bombing children while our president tearfully addresses the slaughter of children by a mad man. Lies and hypocrisy and greed rule our public air waves and our political process. Camus tells us that the line between murderers (and their accomplices) can be clearly drawn by those who refuse to become accomplices and says, “we must resist with our whole being.”

The poem is the dance of heart and intellect among the ten thousand things. Like any other kind of writing, it can be trivialized and corrupted. But the true poem arises naturally and is less “about” the poet than about human character and shared experience. Many of us, I believe, are deeply inspired by those who have been silenced. When silence is complicitous, we must speak out and speak clearly.

 

Veronica Golos, Writing for Peace AdvisorAbout Writing for Peace Adviser, Veronica Golos

Golos is the author of Vocabulary of Silence (Red Hen Press, 2011), winner of the 2011 New Mexico Book Award, as well as A Bell Buried Deep, co winner of the Nicholas Roerich Poetry Prize (Story Line Press). She was Poet in Residence at Sacred Heart Academy in Greenwich, CT in 2005, at the Nassau Museum of Art, and Yaxche School in Taos,New Mexico. She has lectured on Teaching Poetry to Children at Columbia University’s Teacher’s College and Colorado State College. Golos’ work has been widely published and anthologized nationally and internationally, including Meridians, Drunken Boat, Orbus (London), and Liqueur44 (Paris). She has performed at the Nuyorican Café, LincolnCenter, and Cornelia Street Café in NYC, and many venues in the Southwest. A lifelong activist for social justice, humanitarian and peace causes, Golos uses her poetry not only to interpret and question but “to challenge and act.”

Learn more about Veronica Golos here.

Sam Hamill, Writing for Peace Advisor

About Writing for Peace Adviser, Sam Hamill

Sam Hamill is the author of more than forty books, including fifteen volumes of original poetry (most recently Measured by Stone and Almost Paradise: New & Selected Poems & Translations); four collections of literary essays, including A Poet’s Work and Avocations: On Poetry & Poets; and some of the most distinguished translations of ancient Chinese and Japanese classics of the last half-century. He co-founded, and for thirty-two years was editor at, Copper Canyon Press. He taught in prisons for fourteen years and has worked extensively with battered women and children. An outspoken political pacifist, in 2003, declining an invitation to the White House, he founded Poets Against War, compiling the largest single-theme poetry anthology in history, 30,000 poems by 26,000 poets. He has been awarded fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Guggenheim Foundation, the Woodrow Wilson Foundation, the Mellon Fund, and the Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission; other honors include the Stanley Lindberg Lifetime Achievement Award for Editing, the Washington Poets’ Association Lifetime Achievement in Poetry Award, two Washington Governor’s Arts Awards, a Western States Book Award, a PEN-Oakland Anti-censorship Award, a PEN Center/USA First Amendment Award, the Charity Randall Award from The Poetry Forum, and the Condecoración de la Universidad de Carabobo in Valencia, Venezuela. His work has been translated into a dozen languages. He lives in Anacortes, Washington.

February Writing for Peace News:

All during the month of February, Writing for Peace is commemorating the Tenth Anniversary of Poets Against the War with a Daily PAW Post. If you are interested in arranging a reading this month in honor of Poets Against the War, please contact us with the details at editor@writingforpeace.org, and we will be happy to share your information on our site.

2013 Young Writers Contest

Contest Deadline is March 1st! The Writing for Peace Young Writers Contest is in full swing, with entries coming in from all over the globe.  The contest is open to writers of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction, for ages 13 to 19. Spread the word to young writers everywhere! You’ll find contest guidelines here.

DoveTales,  An International Journal of the Arts

The first issue of DoveTales will be released this month, featuring poets, writers, artists and photographers from all over the world.  We are also looking forward to seeing the winners of our 2012 Young Writers Contest in print. Watch our posts for news of the journal’s release. The new submission guidelines will go up on March 1st. Thank you for your support!

 

 

Copyright © 2013 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

 

Tourist Attraction, by Peter Street

Sam Hamill, Writing for Peace AdviserCommemorating Ten Years of Poetic Resistance, PAW Post No. 25

During the month of February, Writing for Peace  commemorates the Tenth Anniversary of Poets Against the War with Daily PAW Posts from a host of contributors.

*Parental Guidance Warning –The poets featured during our February Daily PAW Posts write of war and its effect on the human heart. Writing for Peace has not censored these poems, and we encourage parents to review the content before sharing them with children.

To purchase a copy of POETS AGAINST THE WAR from Powell’s independent bookstore, click here.

Small Writing for Peace logo

Tourist Attraction

by Peter Street

We are sheep or slaves
walking in a long line,
towed by a man on his tractor
to a Police Station with its face
blown off.

He shouts “Stay on the tarmac –
everything else is landmined!”

We chug past without looking:
bright red swastikas and dicks
painted on white walls where family life
once sang out its parties, now piled up
in the front garden.

He points to Serbian cannons.
There’s a silence we’ve never heard before:

no birds, no cats, no dogs.

Peter Street, Writing for Peace AdvisorAbout Writing for Peace Adviser, Peter Street

He has published five previous poetry collections. His first, Out Of The Fire (spike books) was nominated for the 1993 Forward prize. The same year, I.T.V. television broadcast a twelve minutes Remembrance Sunday Special about his time as a war poet during the Bosnian/Croatian conflict. Street has also been seen on Zoom T.V.,  Rundrunk, Munich, Germany and Nederlandse programma Stichting ( NPS Holland).  His poetry has been broadcast on the World Service and he was poet in residence for B.B.C.’s Greater Manchester ” Who Cares?” and also the B.B.C. G.M.R. Arts program.  He won the Poetry Society’s Fish and Chip Placement. Street has been Writer-In Residence in many schools, colleges and prisons and at the International Youth Camp. In 207 Street wrote a series of poems for the highly successful Tony Bevan Catalogue. He is a qualified Arborist and has previously worked as a forester, a Mediterranean chef, and gravedigger/exhumer. Street is a recent recipient of a Royal Literary Fund Grant.

 

February Writing for Peace News:

All during the month of February, Writing for Peace is commemorating the Tenth Anniversary of Poets Against the War with a Daily PAW Post. If you are interested in arranging a reading this month in honor of Poets Against the War, please contact us with the details at editor@writingforpeace.org, and we will be happy to share your information on our site.

2013 Young Writers Contest

Contest Deadline is March 1st! The Writing for Peace Young Writers Contest is in full swing, with entries coming in from all over the globe.  The contest is open to writers of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction, for ages 13 to 19. Spread the word to young writers everywhere! You’ll find contest guidelines here.

DoveTales,  An International Journal of the Arts

The first issue of DoveTales will be released this month, featuring poets, writers, artists and photographers from all over the world.  We are also looking forward to seeing the winners of our 2012 Young Writers Contest in print. Watch our posts for news of the journal’s release. The new submission guidelines will go up on March 1st. Thank you for your support!

 

 

Copyright © 2013 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

 

My Brother’s Computer, by Maija Rhee Devine

Sam Hamill, Writing for Peace AdviserCommemorating Ten Years of Poetic Resistance, PAW Post No. 24

During the month of February, Writing for Peace  commemorates the Tenth Anniversary of Poets Against the War with Daily PAW Posts from a host of contributors.

*Parental Guidance Warning –The poets featured during our February Daily PAW Posts write of war and its effect on the human heart. Writing for Peace has not censored these poems, and we encourage parents to review the content before sharing them with children.

To purchase a copy of POETS AGAINST THE WAR from Powell’s independent bookstore, click here.

 Small Writing for Peace logo

Writing for Peace Welcome guest poet, Maija Rhee Devine.
My Brother’s Computer was originally written in Korean and translated to English by the author.

My Brother’s Computer

 
My brother is 77 years old.

At fifteen, recruited by Korean Navy
To do a job like Radar’s in M*A*S*H
He rode in U.S. Patrol Craft 703
Ready to kill, in a wing of 260-battle-ship fleet
Commanded by General Douglas MacArthur.
One September night,1950, Korean Navy blooded
N. Korean communists on Youngheung Island
Planted Korean flag atop the hill
He sped away for his night shift in PC703
Only to learn at dawn
The fourteen war buddies he left behind
Were bullet-riddled to unidentifiable bodies
By enemy troops who sneaked
across the tide-drained strait.

I’ve sinned
I’ve sinned by staying alive
What can I do to cleanse this sin?
What can I do with my life
To make it worth fourteen lives?
Shriveled under that weight
He mourned each day for six decades

As shrunken is his computer
Out its phlegm-congested throat come mysterious groans
The battery has already given up its ghost
Why don’t I get you a new one? I offer during my visit to Seoul.
Oh, no, no.  My daughter-in-law’s getting
A new computer.  Her old one will be my new one,
He says.

Until the “new” one arrives, he goes through these steps.
He turns on the surge protector, which he turns off each night.
Presses the “on” button.
Then the “F 1”
“F 10”
“Enter”
“Esc”
The Windows screen blinks through its many phases
When it’s done, he presses “Begin,” “Program,” “Internet.”
If the “Internet” doesn’t surface
He enters the time, date, and year.

Then clicks “Apply” and “Confirm”

Ahhh!  The internet’s up!

At his age, I’m lucky he knows what a computer is.
And here comes his E-mail message
Limping, coughing, and wheezing across the Pacific Ocean
Lands on my morning tea in Missouri
Hot, heart-shaped.

Published in a Korean literary journal 윌더니스, 2011 겨울호

 

Maija Rhee Devine, Writing for Peace Guest PoetAbout Maija Rhee Devine

Maija Rhee Devine, a Korean-born writer whose fiction, non-fiction, and poetry have appeared in Michigan Quarterly Review, Boulevard, North American Review, and The Kenyon Review, and in anthologies, holds a B.A. in English from Sogang University in Seoul and an M.A. in English from St. Louis University.  Writing honors include an NEA grant and nominations to Pushcart Prize and O. Henry Awards. Her novel, The Voices of Heaven, is set during the Korean War, and flows from first-hand experience of growing up in Seoul during the war and its aftermath.  Long Walks on Short Days, her poetry chapbook about Korea, China, U.S. and other countries she traveled to, is available now through April 5, 2013, at http://finishinglinepress.com for preorders.

 February Writing for Peace News:

All during the month of February, Writing for Peace is commemorating the Tenth Anniversary of Poets Against the War with a Daily PAW Post. If you are interested in arranging a reading this month in honor of Poets Against the War, please contact us with the details at editor@writingforpeace.org, and we will be happy to share your information on our site.

2013 Young Writers Contest

Contest Deadline is March 1st! The Writing for Peace Young Writers Contest is in full swing, with entries coming in from all over the globe.  The contest is open to writers of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction, for ages 13 to 19. Spread the word to young writers everywhere! You’ll find contest guidelines here.

DoveTales,  An International Journal of the Arts

The first issue of DoveTales will be released this month, featuring poets, writers, artists and photographers from all over the world.  We are also looking forward to seeing the winners of our 2012 Young Writers Contest in print. Watch our posts for news of the journal’s release. The new submission guidelines will go up on March 1st. Thank you for your support!

 

 

Copyright © 2013 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

 

 

War Bits, by David Scott Pointer

Sam Hamill, Writing for Peace AdviserCommemorating Ten Years of Poetic Resistance, PAW Post No. 23

During the month of February, Writing for Peace  commemorates the Tenth Anniversary of Poets Against the War with Daily PAW Posts from a host of contributors.

*Parental Guidance Warning –The poets featured during our February Daily PAW Posts write of war and its effect on the human heart. Writing for Peace has not censored these poems, and we encourage parents to review the content before sharing them with children.

To purchase a copy of POETS AGAINST THE WAR from Powell’s independent bookstore, click here.

 Small Writing for Peace logo

War Bits

by David Scott Pointer Writing for Peace Adviser David Scott Pointer, child soldier

Already a
toy cannon
by the old
potty chair is
laying claim
to the Tooth
Fairy’s lands
beneath the
child’s pillow,
and overseas
three young
Marines learn
Friendly Fire’s
bullet is
sometimes
dispensed as
an explosive
roar of
wraparound
flame.

 

About Writing for Peace Adviser, David Scott Pointer

David Scott Pointer is a long time social justice/political poet. His father, a piano playing bank robber, died when David was just 3 years old, leaving him to be raised by his grandmother, who determined that the best way to keep her young charge from emulating his “scoundrel” father was to socialize him to be a good soldier. To learn more about David Scott Pointer, click here.

February Writing for Peace News:

All during the month of February, Writing for Peace is commemorating the Tenth Anniversary of Poets Against the War with a Daily PAW Post. If you are interested in arranging a reading this month in honor of Poets Against the War, please contact us with the details at editor@writingforpeace.org, and we will be happy to share your information on our site.

2013 Young Writers Contest

Contest Deadline is March 1st! The Writing for Peace Young Writers Contest is in full swing, with entries coming in from all over the globe.  The contest is open to writers of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction, for ages 13 to 19. Spread the word to young writers everywhere! You’ll find contest guidelines here.

DoveTales,  An International Journal of the Arts

The first issue of DoveTales will be released this month, featuring poets, writers, artists and photographers from all over the world.  We are also looking forward to seeing the winners of our 2012 Young Writers Contest in print. Watch our posts for news of the journal’s release. The new submission guidelines will go up on March 1st. Thank you for your support!

 

 

 

Copyright © 2013 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

 

 

the bloodied hand, by Richard Krawiec

Sam Hamill, Writing for Peace AdviserCommemorating Ten Years of Poetic Resistance, PAW Post No. 22

During the month of February, Writing for Peace  commemorates the Tenth Anniversary of Poets Against the War with Daily PAW Posts from a host of contributors.

*Parental Guidance Warning –The poets featured during our February Daily PAW Posts write of war and its effect on the human heart. Writing for Peace has not censored these poems, and we encourage parents to review the content before sharing them with children.

To purchase a copy of POETS AGAINST THE WAR from Powell’s independent bookstore, click here.

Small Writing for Peace logo

the bloodied hand

by Richard Krawiec

gropes up through rubbled bricks
it doesn’t matter
if from IED or drone
improvised destruction
as effective as planned
the hand caresses
the air as if apologizing
for being a child
but the hand
doesn’t weep

 

Richard Krawiec, Writing for Peace AdviserAbout Writing for Peace Adviser, Richard Krawiec

Richard Krawiec is the founder of Jacar Press, A Community active Press dedicated to paying writers and working in under-served communities and has worked extensively with people in homeless shelters, women’s shelters, prisons, literacy classes, and community sites, teaching writing. Richard’s second book of poems, She Hands me the Razor, (title poem nominated for a Pushcart Prize) was published by Press 53. It was one of 17 finalists for a SIBA Award.

To learn more about Richard Krawiec, check out his page here.

February Writing for Peace News:

All during the month of February, Writing for Peace is commemorating the Tenth Anniversary of Poets Against the War with a Daily PAW Post. If you are interested in arranging a reading this month in honor of Poets Against the War, please contact us with the details at editor@writingforpeace.org, and we will be happy to share your information on our site.

2013 Young Writers Contest

Contest Deadline is March 1st! The Writing for Peace Young Writers Contest is in full swing, with entries coming in from all over the globe.  The contest is open to writers of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction, for ages 13 to 19. Spread the word to young writers everywhere! You’ll find contest guidelines here.

DoveTales,  An International Journal of the Arts

The first issue of DoveTales will be released this month, featuring poets, writers, artists and photographers from all over the world.  We are also looking forward to seeing the winners of our 2012 Young Writers Contest in print. Watch our posts for news of the journal’s release. The new submission guidelines will go up on March 1st. Thank you for your support!

 

Copyright © 2013 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

 

What We Did Instead, by Jennifer Boyden

Sam Hamill, Writing for Peace AdviserCommemorating Ten Years of Poetic Resistance, PAW Post No. 21

During the month of February, Writing for Peace  commemorates the Tenth Anniversary of Poets Against the War with Daily PAW Posts from a host of contributors.

*Parental Guidance Warning –The poets featured during our February Daily PAW Posts write of war and its effect on the human heart. Writing for Peace has not censored these poems, and we encourage parents to review the content before sharing them with children.

To purchase a copy of POETS AGAINST THE WAR from Powell’s independent bookstore, click here.

Small Writing for Peace logo

What We Did Instead

by Jennifer Boyden

 I have a theory about my husband’s penis,
 which is
                   that if we had installed a device
 under our bed and programmed it to a thrust-
 activated movement sensor to trigger a voice
 which cried “war, war, war”—if we’d done
 that ten years ago, we wouldn’t have
 our daughter now.
 My husband, who has one heart that shines
 on the table of all possible hearts,
 would have had to fold up his penis
 and put it away until the sensor broke
 or we forced ourselves to pretend
 that the word war was just another word
 for shake your ass, or hold it there, or next time 
 let’s eat chicken with our fingers while we do this,
 or perhaps a word for boring sexy.
                                    I noticed in the paper
 how the runway models were thin again
 and blackeyed in clothing that wouldn’t get stolen
 in a refugee camp. I think it means something
 that lately when I put on my shoes
 I think: do these work
 for fleeing a homeland? / How easy would it be
 to steal them off my exhausted feet?
 Lately, my boots lace to the knees.
 When she was three my daughter asked me
 if she would ever know war in her heart.
 That was about four years after we didn’t install
 the sensor machine.
                    What we did instead
 was go to Minnesota in the middle of winter
 where it was so cold the fish we pulled up
 through the ice holes
                    were green logs with eyes.
 We cut them open and threw their guts at winter
 where the birds ate them. We were there
 to visit my family, all just in from the frozen lake
 of the blue-green fish,
 and I was a few beers down with an egg
 on its way and for a moment as I stood
 with my husband among my people who were
 breading the fish and humming and slapping
 their legs by the fire, there was
 no war anywhere. I mean this is what we had
 at that moment:
                  food, fire, a game
 on the wood table where people pressed
 buzzers and flipped the timer, laughing. We turned away
 to head upstairs to the room we shared.
 We closed the door. We lay down
 where no one had thought to install the machine,
 and we made one child and later had to open her
 slowly so the world could enter bit by bit,
 and the world was sharp where she was best.
 The retail index reveals there is something sexy
 about how the models are nearly dead with hunger.
 In our bed, we read books and hear
 a voice that, if we turn our heads properly,
 sounds like it’s calling us to sleep.
  

About Jennifer Boyden

Jennifer Boyden’s new book, The Declarable Future (winner of the Four Lakes Poetry Prize), was just released by University of Wisconsin Press. Her previous collection, The Mouths of Grazing Things, won the Brittingham Prize for Poetry in 2010. She recently returned from a year of teaching creative writing and ecopoetry at Soochow University in China. Boyden is a poet, teacher, and current writer-in-residence at Grass Mountain in Oregon. Her work has been recognized with the PEN Northwest Wilderness Writing Award, an Artists Trust Grant, and can be found in a variety of literary journals.

Check out her website here.

 

 

 February Writing for Peace News:

All during the month of February, Writing for Peace is commemorating the Tenth Anniversary of Poets Against the War with a Daily PAW Post. If you are interested in arranging a reading this month in honor of Poets Against the War, please contact us with the details at editor@writingforpeace.org, and we will be happy to share your information on our site.

Richard Krawiec, Writing for Peace AdviserWriting for Peace Welcomes Richard Krawiec to our Advisory Panel

Richard Krawiec is the founder of Jacar Press, A Community active Press dedicated to paying writers and working in under-served communities and has worked extensively with people in homeless shelters, women’s shelters, prisons, literacy classes, and community sites, teaching writing.  Richard’s second book of poems, She Hands me the Razor, (title poem nominated for a Pushcart Prize) was published by Press 53. It was one of 17 finalists for a SIBA Award.

To learn more about Richard Krawiec, check out his page here.

2013 Young Writers Contest

Contest Deadline is March 1st! The Writing for Peace Young Writers Contest is in full swing, with entries coming in from all over the globe.  The contest is open to writers of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction, for ages 13 to 19. Spread the word to young writers everywhere! You’ll find contest guidelines here.

DoveTales,  An International Journal of the Arts

The first issue of DoveTales will be released this month, featuring poets, writers, artists and photographers from all over the world.  We are also looking forward to seeing the winners of our 2012 Young Writers Contest in print. Watch our posts for news of the journal’s release. The new submission guidelines will go up on March 1st. Thank you for your support!

 

 

 

 

Copyright © 2013 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 


					

Vocabulary of Silence, by Veronica Golos

Sam Hamill, Writing for Peace AdviserCommemorating Ten Years of Poetic Resistance, PAW Post No. 20

During the month of February, Writing for Peace  commemorates the Tenth Anniversary of Poets Against the War with Daily PAW Posts from a host of contributors.

*Parental Guidance Warning –The poets featured during our February Daily PAW Posts write of war and its effect on the human heart. Writing for Peace has not censored these poems, and we encourage parents to review the content before sharing them with children.

To purchase a copy of POETS AGAINST THE WAR from Powell’s independent bookstore, click here.

Small Writing for Peace logo

Vocabulary of Silence, Arabic translation by Nizar Sartawi
 

Vocabulary of Silence

 by Veronica Golos

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Veronica Golos, Writing for Peace AdvisorAbout Writing for Peace Adviser, Veronica Golos

Golos is the author of Vocabulary of Silence (Red Hen Press, 2011), winner of the 2011 New Mexico Book Award, as well as A Bell Buried Deep, co winner of the Nicholas Roerich Poetry Prize (Story Line Press). She was Poet in Residence at Sacred Heart Academy in Greenwich, CT in 2005, at the Nassau Museum of Art, and Yaxche School in Taos,New Mexico. She has lectured on Teaching Poetry to Children at Columbia University’s Teacher’s College and Colorado State College. Golos’ work has been widely published and anthologized nationally and internationally, including Meridians, Drunken Boat, Orbus (London), and Liqueur44 (Paris). She has performed at the Nuyorican Café, LincolnCenter, and Cornelia Street Café in NYC, and many venues in the Southwest. A lifelong activist for social justice, humanitarian and peace causes, Golos uses her poetry not only to interpret and question but “to challenge and act.”

Learn more about Veronica Golos here.

February Writing for Peace News:

All during the month of February, Writing for Peace is commemorating the Tenth Anniversary of Poets Against the War with a Daily PAW Post. If you are interested in arranging a reading this month in honor of Poets Against the War, please contact us with the details at editor@writingforpeace.org, and we will be happy to share your information on our site.

2013 Young Writers Contest

Contest Deadline is March 1st! The Writing for Peace Young Writers Contest is in full swing, with entries coming in from all over the globe.  The contest is open to writers of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction, for ages 13 to 19. Spread the word to young writers everywhere! You’ll find contest guidelines here.

DoveTales,  An International Journal of the Arts

The first issue of DoveTales will be released this month, featuring poets, writers, artists and photographers from all over the world.  We are also looking forward to seeing the winners of our 2012 Young Writers Contest in print. Watch our posts for news of the journal’s release. The new submission guidelines will go up on March 1st. Thank you for your support!

 

Copyright © 2013 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.