Category Archives: DoveTales

When Silence is Not An Option, by Carmel Mawle

“We must finally stop appealing to theology to justify our reserved silence about what the state is doing — for that is nothing but fear. ‘Open your mouth for the one who is voiceless’ — for who in the church today still remembers that that is the least of the Bible’s demands in times such as these?”

~Dietrich Bonhoeffer

Deitrich Bonhoeffer (1906-1945), the German author of The Cost of Discipleship and founder of the Confessing Church, attended seminary in New York, where he developed a friendship with Frank Fisher, a black fellow-seminarian from Harlem’s Abyssinian Baptist Church, and was moved and inspired by the Gospel of Social Justice.

As his own Christian conviction was deepened, Bonhoeffer made the decision to return to a Germany increasingly under the sway of Nazism, leaving behind his friends, fiancé and safety, becoming one of its most vocal resisters.

“I have come to the conclusion that I made a mistake in coming to America. I must live through this difficult period in our national history with the people of Germany. I will have no right to participate in the reconstruction of Christian life in Germany after the war if I do not share the trials of this time with my people … Christians in Germany will have to face the terrible alternative of either willing the defeat of their nation in order that Christian civilization may survive or willing the victory of their nation and thereby destroying civilization. I know which of these alternatives I must choose but I cannot make that choice from security.”

He was imprisoned for nearly two years, and ultimately was accused of playing a role in a plot to murder Hitler and hanged. Despite the danger of dissent, Bonhoeffer never hesitated to speak truth to power.

If there is one thing we have seen in the current alignment of power, nationalism, and greed  gaining ground all over this beautiful wounded planet, it is that no theology (or lack thereof) has cornered the market in hypocrisy. There seem to be factions of every faith and philosophy that can find justification within their man-made tenets for cruelty to the voiceless, the powerless.

Here in the United States, there are Christians who cling to isolated stories of persecution in the Middle East, or at home where secularists might have the gall to wish them “Happy Holidays” instead of “Merry Christmas”. They revel in examples of persecution by radical Islamists, ignoring the persecution of Muslims in China, India, Myanmar, Israel, the United States and elsewhere. They choose to focus on the insignificant, rather than see their own hypocrisy in supporting an Administration that treats immigrants and refugees (most of them professed Christians, themselves) inhumanely, even rationalizing the separation of young children from their parents, causing irreparable trauma and harm to their developing psyches.

It’s in this brutal reality, that my grandchildren return to school and autumn colors blend into our mountain palette, and it’s got me thinking about the coming winter edition of DoveTales. Adviser and Guest Editor, Robert Kostuck, has chosen the insightful theme, “Gardens in the Desert: Cultivating Awareness.” What are we, dear Writers of Peace, if not gardeners in the desert?

If Bonhoeffer, in the midst of a nation frothing for death and destruction, could plant seeds of courage and resistance in enough hearts to become a threat to Der Führer – a testament to the power of conviction and words – then what can thousands of us with that same conviction accomplish?

We will create gardens in the desert of social injustice with our words and actions. We will not stand idly by as children are deprived of hope and safety and life. We will not remain silent as our planet is ravaged and the Amazon disappears into flames. This globe is our garden. The refugees and prisoners across its surface are our family. Yours and mine. Silence is not an option.

The reading period for our Winter Edition is open until November 1st. As writers, we cultivate awareness through our words, stanzas and sentences.  Send us your work and together we’ll spread the seeds of social justice and peaceful activism where there is fertile soil and where there is not.

Carmel Mawle is founder of the nonprofit literary organization, Writing for Peace, and has served as Editor-in-Chief of DoveTales, An International Journal of the Arts since 2013. A Pushcart Nominee, her short stories, essays and poetry have been published in literary journals and anthologies, including Smokelong Quarterly and Shake the Tree Anthology.

 


2019 Writing for Peace Online Youth Summit

Now accepting submissions for the Youth Summit here.

Theme: Day By Day, Hand in Hand: Seeing & Creating Peace in Daily Action


Check out DoveTales Online Now ~


Copyright © 2019 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

 

 

DoveTales Online, Issue 1 – August 2019

Our first issue of DoveTales Online is up!

DoveTales, a publication of Writing for PeaceSince 2013, Writing for Peace has invited writers and artists from all over the globe to explore themes within the context of current events. Their responsespoetry, fiction, nonfiction, art and photographytell us something about the nature of humanity. We learn from each other. We share our joys and grief, empathy and compassion, the wisdom of years and youth, and the dream of a world that is healthy and diverse, with equality and justice for every sentient beingwhether or not they can afford political lobbyists. This philosophy resulted in a collection of beautiful print booksOccupied, Contrast, Nature, Family and Cultural Identity, Refugees and the Displaced, and Empathy in Art: Embracing the Otherthat educate, inspire, and challenge us.

We continue this tradition with our new online journal, celebrating the community we have built together, and supporting each other in our efforts to leave this world a better place for future generations—and being online, we can do it with more color, audio and videos!

In this, our first issue of DoveTales Online, you’ll find our 2019 Young Writers Contest Winners, as well as poetry, prose, and visual art that delves into our Guest Editor, Patricia Jabbeh Wesley’s theme: “One World, One People.” If this theme seems incongruous with our daily news, make a cup of tea, get comfortable, and find out what her thought process was in choosing it. Thank you for joining us in the debut of DoveTales, An International Online Journal of the Arts!

Check out DoveTales Online Now ~

 

Copyright © 2019 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

Good things are coming!

Good morning, peace writers!

Hoping you’re all feeling energized by the latest news and not despairing. Good things are happening. Light is shining in dark places. Hidden evils are being revealed. Remember, when horrible news surfaces—over 900 children separated from their parents since this disastrous policy was “ended,” mass shootings becoming commonplace, climate change speeding up and scientists silenced, to name a few—it is because writers and activists are refusing to let them fester in the dark. Hard truths gain power when they are kept secrets, so let’s celebrate the knowing and keep on pushing forward. We’re in this together.

We’re working hard here at Writing for Peace. If you’re reading this on the website, you may have already seen some changes there. The site is looking pretty slicknew event calendar, streamlined format, and mobile responsive. It should be much easier to navigate on any device. All this in preparation for the launch of our beautiful new online DoveTales!

Tomorrow is the big day. DoveTales, An International Journal of the Arts is going online! I’m seeing it take shape here, and it’s absolutely gorgeous. Guest editor Patricia Jabbeh Wesley’s theme, “One World, One People,” has resonated with writers and artists across the globe. You’ll find hard truth, hope, love and laughter in its illuminated pages. And you won’t want to miss our young writers’ beautiful winning poems, essays and stories.

So keep the faith and watch for our new DoveTales tomorrow. We’ll be working right up until it launches, so send a good thought our way.

Wishing you peace and strength,

Carmel

Carmel Mawle is founder of the nonprofit literary organization, Writing for Peace, and has served as Editor-in-Chief of DoveTales, An International Journal of the Arts since 2013. A Pushcart Nominee, her short stories, essays and poetry have been published in literary journals and anthologies, including Smokelong Quarterly and Shake the Tree Anthology.

Copyright © 2019 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

Recharge for Upcoming Writing Deadlines

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Hello fellow Writers for Peace,

I hope you are all enjoying the emerging spring, or conversely (for our friends in the southern hemisphere), the autumn colors. Here in the Rocky Mountains, the melting snow is filling the creek beds with icy whitewater and, after months of cold and snow, the slopes and meadows are greening up. When so much of what is reported by the corporate media is gloom and doom, we can still find hope in the changing colors of the seasons. Even in the concrete cities, nature finds its way into the cracks between slabs of pavement. Take a few moments to appreciate the life that is beyond our small scope and busy days; breathe in the earth’s ever-changing colors and recharge the energy that feeds your creativity. Don’t doubt that this troubled world is more beautiful because of what you bring to it.

I want to remind you of two important Writing for Peace deadlines coming up on June 1st:

Young Writers Contest GuidelinesFirst, is our Young Writers Contest for ages 13-19. Over the seven years we have offered this contest, we have had entries from 26 different countries. It’s an unusual challenge to develop the writers’ tool of empathy, to research and educate oneself on a new culture, the history, politics, even religious traditions and pressures of a region, and write from the perspective of a character within that culture. The challenge is to avoid stereotypes and find the universal commonalities that make us all (as our adviser Patricia Jabbeh Wesley says so beautifully), “one people.”

Please encourage the young writers you know to join their peers and accept this challenge. Let’s hear what this new generation of young writers has to say.

DoveTales, a publication of Writing for PeaceAnd secondly, DoveTales, an International Journal of the Arts, is graduating to a new, more accessible, medium. After six extraordinary print journals, DoveTales is going online. While we traditionalists may miss curling up with the printed book, there’s no denying the advantages of an online journal in reaching a greater audience. Our goal has always been to lift up work by our advisers, new, and emerging writers from across the globe who have something important to add to the collective conversation on resistance, creativity, human rights, cherishing each other and the planet we live on.

Patricia Jabbeh Wesley, Writing for Peace AdviserWe are honored that our Adviser Patricia Jabbeh Wesley has agreed to serve as Guest Editor of our first online edition of DoveTales, launching on August 1st, 2019. Her theme for the  edition is “One World, One People.” The reading period for this journal will close on June 1st, 2019.

So, dear writers and readers, let’s take a deep breath, reach out to each other through the written word, and connect with our inner green earth. There is much work to do, but we’re not alone.

Much love, Carmel

~~~

Carmel-Laughing-1Carmel Mawle is the Founder and President of the Board of Directors for Writing for Peace. She writes from the northern Colorado Rocky Mountains where she lives with her husband and Max, a ten-pound border terrier mix who firmly believes he’s a mountain dog.

Copyright © 2019 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

Empathy in Art: Embracing the Other Book Launch Celebration

2018 DoveTales Front coverWe are excited to announce the coming release of our sixth edition of DoveTales, an International Journal of the Arts. Our latest book is themed and titled Empathy in Art: Embracing the Other and features the work of 70 writers and artists from countries all over the globe, examining the far-reaching implications of empathy through their chosen art forms, as well as the winning work from both our 2017 and 2018 Young Writers Contest.

We hope you’ll join us for our online book launch celebration with a series of short video readings from our tables to yours. You’ll find these sumptuous readings on our Facebook Page beginning on August 15th, 2018.

This book is rich with imagery, taking the idea of  “embracing the other” a step further, with the hope of sharing nourishment and breaking bread together. You’ll find that many of our contributors lingered in the tastes and fragrances of sustenance. Some of our advisers’ have even shared their favorite recipes!

Dedicated to the memory of Sam Hamill, who passed away this spring, Empathy in Art: Embracing the Other, features two fabulous advisers, Patricia Jabbeh Wesley and Wang Ping.

Front Cover: Christopher Woods, “All About Free.”

Available for pre-order now, here!

Book Description:
DoveTales, An International Journal of the Arts, “Empathy in Art: Embracing the Other” edition features poetry, essays,  and short stories from our 2017 and 2018 Young Contest Winners, our advisers, established, and emerging writers, as well as strikingly beautiful art and photography.

$14.95 Paperback, 436 Pages

Copyright © 2018 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

First Amendment Essential to Peaceful Activism, by Andrea Doray, Plus Young Writer Contest Results

President’s Corner:

A free press, and freedom of speech, are essential to peaceful activism

by Andrea W. Doray

Andrea DorayI am a writer. And – as far as I know – no one is offering a bounty for one of my ears.

Not so for Akram Aylisli, a highly regarded writer, poet, and scriptwriter from Azerbaijan who once received that country’s most prestigious literary prize. However, in 2013, the leader of the Modern Musavat party announced that he would pay a bounty equivalent to $12,700 USD to anyone who cuts off Aylisli’s ear.

The impetus for this threat was Aylisli’s novel, Stone Dreams, which provides a sympathetic view of Armenians in Azerbaijan’s ongoing ethnic disputes. Aylisli is accused of describing only Azeri abuses against Armenians, and not addressing attacks by Armenians on Azeris.

Azerbaijan’s president also stripped Aylisli of the title of “People’s Writer.” And although the Minister of the Interior has announced that calls for violence are unacceptable, the threat to Aylisli remains.

Although he was already 75, Aylisli began contemplating seeking asylum abroad with his family. A writer, he says, has the right to express his thoughts without being considered a traitor. However, government officials in Azerbaijan have labeled Aylisli’s book as treasonous.

A year ago in 2016, Aylisli said that he had been stopped from travelling to a literary festival in Italy by border police when he arrived at Baku airport. His bags, which had already been checked in, were taken off the plane and searched. He was taken into the custody of the airport police and falsely, he says, accused of creating a public disturbance. He was interrogated and held by the police for more than 10 hours.

Aylisli, self-described as a 78-year-old writer in poor health and suffering from a heart condition, allegedly punched a border guard, a claim that was later used by the border service as an explanation for denying the border crossing.

Index on Censorship later released part of the speech he had been due to make at the Venice festival. In it, Aylisli writes: “I was a hero for some and a traitor for others. I never for a moment felt I was a hero or traitor, just a regular writer and humanitarian who is able to feel the pain of others.”

The editor of Index on Censorship Rachael Jolley told The Guardian that the Index on Censorship translated and published extracts from the speech because they felt it was important for the public to read what he was planning to say about the role of the writer and the right to criticism.

The situation, as I see it, is suppression of a perspective that does not support the nationalist stance on the Azerbaijani/Armenian conflict. And that is called censorship, even though, in Azerbaijan as in other countries – including the United States where I live – authors have a constitutional right to write what they want without pressure or government interference. Book bans and book burnings notwithstanding, American constitutional rights fare better than those in Azerbaijan.

Yet, even in a country where freedom of the press is guaranteed by the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, writers are under siege. Just yesterday, April 30, 2017, Reince Priebus, Chief of Staff for the current administration under Donald Trump, said and repeated on the record that abridging or abolishing the First Amendment is something the Trump White House is currently considering.

It’s taken much of the USA’s 200+-year history to give voice to differing perspectives about events surrounding Native Americans, slavery, immigration, child labor, internment camps, McCarthyism, Kent State, Iran Contras, waterboarding, WikiLeaks, extraordinary rendition, and others, and one man is threatening to sue news outlets – not just in the United States – and jail individual writers and journalists on vague charges of treason. All because the sitting president doesn’t like his press coverage.

I personally have written, with critical opinions, about many of these subjects. And, to date in my country, no matter what I write, how I write it, or who I please or offend with my writing, I’m reasonably assured of keeping both my ears. And if that should ever change, we all have a much larger problem.

I do, however, have some words of advice for the White House, and for regimes around the world, that want to try. As Edward Bulwer-Lytton famously wrote in 1839 – and as systematic oppression against writers has proved since antiquity – the pen is mightier than the sword.

Let’s all pick up our pens and wield them as swords against any who would suppress and oppress free speech. Let’s accept our roles as writers and humanitarians who are able to feel the pain of others. And let’s teach our coming generations that peaceful activism begins on the page.

To this end, we at Writing for Peace are pleased to announce the winners of our 2017 Young Writers Contest. These young people from around the globe submitted their unique perspectives in poetry, essays, and fiction, and we are enriched through their wisdom. You will find last year’s winning entries in the latest edition of DoveTales, our international journal of the arts, which is now available for purchase.

If I may paraphrase Russian-based bestselling author Boris Akunin’s comments from one of his blog posts about Akram Aylisli, “Don’t you know that the state cannot win in a war with a writer?”

I couldn’t agree more.

###

Andrea W. Doray is an award-winning journalist, author, poet, and essayist in Denver, CO, and is occasionally a columnist for The Denver Post through their Colorado Voices panel. Her weekly opinion column, Alchemy, which appears in Colorado Community Media newspapers, has received a first-place award from the Colorado Press Association.Learn more about Andrea and her work here.

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2017 Young Writers Contest Results

Judges: Chip Livingston, poetry; Bradley Wetzler, nonfiction; and Nick Arvin, fiction

Poetry~

First Place: Lisa Zou from Chandler, Arizona, for “Bowls.”

Second Place: Jacqueline He from  San Jose, California, for “狐狸精 // Fox Spirit.”

Third Place: Cindy Song from Rockville, Maryland for “Scaffold.”

Fiction~

First Place: Wajudah Muheeb from Lagos, Nigeria, for “Rainbow Nation.”

Second Place: Jessica Hansen from Burwell, United Kingdom, for “The Exodus.”

Third Place: McKinsey Crozier from Cadillac, Michigan, for “Breath Free.”

Nonfiction~

First Place: Euijin Oh from Seoul, Gangnam-go, South Korea, for “The (Un)Fair Trade Culture: Piracy in the Caribbean.”

Second Place: Riley Mayes from Portland, Maine, for “Smiling at Strangers .”

Third Place: Brandon Sklarin from Smithtown, New York, for “Cuba, My Grandmother’s Journey.”

Finalists~

Poetry: Laura Hinkle & Soo Young Yun

Fiction: Andrew Kim & Ye Joon Han

Nonfiction: Celine Lee & Danielle Zarcone

Congratulations to the winners and finalists. First, second, and third place winners’ work will appear in our 2018 edition of DoveTales, edited by Andrea W. Doray. Many thanks to our judges for the time and thought they put into these decisions.

Writing for Peace would like to thank all of the writers who submitted poetry, fiction and essays for our 2017 Young Writers Contest. We understand it is no small thing to commit to a themed work and then send it out. All participants will shortly receive printed certificates. We hope you will continue to write, research, explore, and ask the questions that need to be asked. The 2018 contest will open on September 1st, 2017 and run until March 1st, 2018.

2017 DoveTales, “Refugees and the Displaced” Now Available

2017 Front CoverThe fifth edition of our annual literary journal, DoveTales, An International Journal of the Arts, will be shipped on May 1st. Our “Refugees and the Displaced” themed DoveTales is a timely affront to a status quo comfortable with the suffering of others. With contributors from every continent on the planet except Antarctica (we’re working on that), this is a book that is meant to challenge assumptions and explore issues of peace, social justice, and our responsibility to our fellow man. Cover art is by Canadian artist, Allen Forrest. You can purchase your copy here.

 

Copyright © 2017 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

2017 DoveTales Now Available for Preorder

2017 Front CoverDoveTales, An International Journal of the Arts

“Refugees and the Displaced”

Our 2017 Edition of DoveTales is now available for Pre-order. Refugees and the Displaced includes work from artists and writers, established and emerging, from every continent of the globe (except Antarctica). You’ll also find there the winning entries from our 2016 Young Writers Contest.

Featured Adviser is Sam Hamill:

Sam Hamill was born in 1943 and grew up on a Utah farm. He is Founding Editor of Copper Canyon Press and served as Editor there for thirty-two years. He taught in artist-in-residency programs in schools and prisons and worked with Domestic Violence programs. He was the founding editor of Copper Canyon Press, directed the Port Townsend Writers Conference for nine years, and in 2003, founded Poets Against the War. He is the author of more than forty books, including celebrated translations from ancient Chinese, Japanese, Greek and Latin.

Contributors include:

Susanne Aspley, Ross Baxter, Rana Bitar, Mark Blickley, Irene Bloom, Elena Botts, Craig Brandis, Miki Byrne, Lauren Camp, Mark Canfield, Lorraine Caputo, Mary Carroll-Hackett, Maryah Converse, Joe Cottonwood, Edward D. Currelley, Lorraine Currelley, Andrea W. Doray, Suzanne Edison, Martín Espada, Bernadette Gallagher, Rachel Gallagher, Adele Gardner, Nancy Gerber, Anuja Ghimire, Juleus Ghunta, Alexandra Grabbe, Sam Hamill, Max Harris, Cheryl R. Hopson, PhD, Emanuel Kane, James Kincaid, Phyllis Klein, Antonia Alexandra Klimenko, Chris ‘Irish Goat’ Knodel, Robert Kostuck, Adam Kotlarczyk, George Kraus, Bruce Lader, Brett LaFave, Joan Leotta, Cory Lockhart, Shannon K. Lockhart, Randel McCraw Helms, Carmel Mawle, Djelloul Marbrook, Joshua McGarry, Sandra McGarry, Silva Zanoyan Merjanian, Michael Meteyer, Dean K. Miller, E. Ethelbert Miller, Shirley Muir, Barry W. North, Carl “Papa” Palmer, Sophia Panieczko, Frances Park, Jenni Parker Gribble, Olga Pavlinova Olenich, Simon Perchik, Shirani Rajapakse, Pilar Rodríguez-Aranda, Althea Romeo-Mark, Ruth Sabath Rosenthal, Wilderness Sarchild, Deirdre Smith, Marydale Stewart, Sugar Tobey, Mercedes Webb-Pullman, Lindsey Weishar, Noah Weisz, Patricia Jabbeh Wesley, Cassondra Windwalker, Barry Zabell

Learn more about our contributors here.

2016 Young Writers Contest Winners:

Fiction: Vivian Zhao, 1st; Julianna Lee, 2nd; Jake Pritchett, 3rd

Nonfiction: Jared Anwar, 1st; Grace Choi, 2nd; Jaeeun Kim, 3rd

Poetry: Lisa Zou, 1st; Lydia Chew, 2nd; Ritika Bharati, 3rd

Art and Photography by:
Amy Bassin, Mark Blickley, Lorraine Currelley, Allen Forrest, SK Lockhart, Mohammad Ali Mirzaei, Farima Qolami

Front Cover: Allen Forrest, Face In The Crowd, Ink, Previously Published in Tidal Basin Review, Issue Winter 2015

Order your copies of DoveTales now here.

 

Copyright © 2017 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

 

A Special Peace Correspondent: The Coming Student Edition, by Elissa Tivona

elissa-tivona-3With the snow recently melted, the first crocuses that break through packed patches of dirt seem, in a word, impossible. I am awed that nature understands how hungry the human heart is for the green promise of growing things. Those tender, fierce flowers awaken a yearning I barely notice at other times of the year.

Likewise in sleepy winter months when the Peace Journalism course gets underway, the intensity and resolve that drove me to create a new curriculum lie dormant. I start out with reasonable intentions: to explore news media’s complicity in shaping violent environments and to teach students methods for turning that woeful trend around.  I craft assignments pointing students toward enlightened, alternative approaches for reporting news, that ask young reporters to elevate social solutions rather than feature stories of persistent strife. But, by the concluding weeks of the semester, I am ready to jump out of my skin. I’ve been staring into too many faces dulled by too many years of schooling and too little inspiration. I have days when I leave campus dispirited and think, “Why bother? This is just not working.”

Still, I keep pushing and prodding up until the day they submit a final assignment. Their challenge is to tell an extended, multi-dimensional, nuanced story; to avoid demonizing one stakeholder over another; and to reach for promising solutions—case studies, prototypes, models, social experiments, moments of insight— real news stories of real people who expend energy in efforts to heal and solve some of the greatest challenges of our day.

And, behold, the crocuses start to emerge.

I offer results of this pedagogical experiment: student stories that point to possibility for new media. These are the green and growing insights of a new generation of young writers.  You will notice a range of voices: some with sustained and focused messages, others that falter.  But each effort loosens the soil, making a little more room for media that nourish hope and dignity rather than perpetuate violent conflict and infamy.

Look ahead to the June edition of The Peace Correspondent, highlighting the work of Colorado State University students. These novice writers feature articles in four categories: Take Another Look, longstanding conflict and new perspectives; Heart to Heart, conversations on challenging topics; On Our Minds, where news media and mental health intersect; and The Peace Correspondent’s regular column Spotlight on Solutions.  Go in peace, friends, spring is here.

Elissa J. Tivona is a renegade journalist who believes media can be part of the solution to achieving sustained peace. She helped establish the Peace and Reconciliation minor at Colorado State University: and she developed the innovative curriculum for the program’s core course, Education for Global Peace, as well as curriculum for a new Journalism offering at CSU, Journalism, War and Peace. Along with her work as an educator, Tivona writes for both academic and popular publications. She is an active volunteer, including: serving on the Board of Writing For Peace; vice-president of the United Nations Association, Northern Colorado Chapter; consultant to Tiyospaye Winyan Maka, an NGO building sustainable homesteads and right livelihoods in collaboration with the Lakota people; and longstanding convener of multi-faith peace advocates in Northern Colorado.

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Coming Soon! Our 2017 DoveTales, “Refugees and the Displaced”

2017 Front CoverThe fifth edition of our annual literary journal, DoveTales, An International Journal of the Arts, will be released on May 1st. Our “Refugees and the Displaced” themed DoveTales is a timely affront to a status quo comfortable with the suffering of others. With contributors from every continent on the planet except Antarctica (we’re working on that), this is a book that is meant to challenge assumptions and explore issues of peace, social justice, and our responsibility to our fellow man. Cover art is by Canadian artist, Allen Forrest. Watch for more information as it becomes available in the next few days on our website, and mark May 1st on your calendar!

 

Young Writers Contest Results

Results are coming on our 2017 Young Writers contest. Announcements will be made on May 1st here in our blog. Stay tuned for the excitement!

Copyright © 2017 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.