Category Archives: DoveTales

Se Eun Pak’s “A Bloody Battle” Nonfiction Finalist and Other W4P News

Read 2020 Young Writers Contest Finalists Pieces In Our July Blog

Congratulations to Se Eun Pak, whose essay “A Bloody Battle” came in as one of two 2020 Young Writers Contest Nonfiction Finalists. Se Eun Pak is in grade 10 at Yongsan International School of Seoul in South Korea. Read her essay in full here.

Friday Live Reading Series

 (photo by David González)

Our last Friday Live Reading, on July 24th, featured Martín Espada who read from his forthcoming book, Floaters, published by W.W. Norton.  Martín Espada is our Featured Writer for the Resistance Edition of DoveTales, An International Journal of the Arts, which launches on August 1st. If you missed his reading, you can watch it here.

Our next Friday Live Reading features Peter Balakian. On Friday, August 7th, at 8pm ET, Pulitzer Prize winner Peter Balakian will read from his work and discuss poetry of witness.

Learn more about Peter Balakian and his work here.

Resistance, Our Summer DoveTales Goes Live August 1st

Brad Wetzler, Guest Editor

As systemic racism and police brutality threaten Black Lives, as nationalism and authoritarianism runs rampant, as the U.S. Homeland Security and Border Patrols turn against American Citizens and detained immigrants, asylum seekers and prisoners of all ages face the Covid-19 virus behind bars, as we are forced to battle disinformation and government apathy during a world pandemic, Resistance is what writers for peace do. Mark August 1st on your calendars to immerse yourself in the powerful work of writers, artists and photographers who remind us that we are all in this together.

As Guest Editor, Brad Wetzler says,

History’s greatest peacemakers, such as Gandhi, Martin Luther King, and Nelson Mandela, have taught us that peace is never passive. Sometimes those of us who love peace must do more than be living examples of peace. We must act, do, rise up, bang the gong, take to the streets. It’s obvious that now is one of these times. By any peaceful means necessary, we must resist the backdoor decisions and cruel acts of power-mongering politicians and corporate leaders who would create suffering for the world’s citizens, especially the vulnerable and powerless. We must use our voices and vast numbers to stop the madness and bring attention back to the one thing we all share in common: our humanity.

Keep writing, keep resisting. Stay safe and well.


Copyright © 2020 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

Resistance DoveTales, Friday Live Readings, and E. Ethelbert Miller Essay

“Resistance” Deadline Extended

Brad Wetzler, Guest Editor

On Monday, writers submitting their work to be considered for our “Resistance” edition of DoveTales  found that our Submittable account had been closed before the June 15th deadline. Apparently, we received so many submissions that we exceed a maximum that we weren’t aware of. The problem has been remedied, and the deadline has been extended to June 20th. We apologize for the inconvenience. Read our full guidelines here.

Friday Live Reading Series

Adviser Lyla June Johnston

Every other Friday, Writing for Peace hosts an hour long reading and discussion on Zoom. It’s casual and conversational, and we always learn something that inspires us in our own writing. Our next reading will be on June 26th with Lyla June Johnston. An adviser since 2013, Lyla June Johnston is an Indigenous musician, scholar, and community servant of Diné (Navajo), Tsétsêhéstâhese (Cheyenne) and European lineages. Her dynamic, multi-genre presentation style has engaged audiences across the globe towards personal, collective and ecological healing.

Check out our complete author lineup, watch videos of our previous readings, and support our fellow writers by purchasing their work. Go to our Friday Live Reading page here.

America Upside Down

Our country is in the midst of a paradigm shift

By Adviser E. Ethelbert Miller | June 15, 2020

Adviser E. Ethelbert Miller

Social historian Vincent Harding often felt it was best to describe black history as being much like a river, flowing toward freedom and the delta of democracy. The challenge we face today is how to navigate this river. Our inability to do this too often leads us to compare historical incidents and movements to one another. We see a protest or a riot and we immediately compare it to the 1960s. Why should one be surprised by police brutality in the black community? Hasn’t there always been one historical moment flowing into the next?

Read the entire article in The American Scholar here.

Young Writers Contest

The 2020 Young Writers Contest is closed. Announcements will be made in our blog on July 1st, 2020.

Copyright © 2020 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

RESISTANCE: Brad Wetzler on Guest Editing Our 2020 Summer DoveTales

I’m honored to have been chosen to edit the summer edition of DoveTales, which will be published on August 1st.  While serving on the board for the past two years,  I’ve  seen Writing for Peace  grow into a mighty force for peace on this precious planet.  Not only does the organization publish important new and established voices dedicated to creating a more peaceful world, but, through our youth writing programs, we plant the seeds for the next generation of writers who will be forced to face new and more complex world issues.

As a theme for the volume,  I’ve selected  “Resistance.”  Why? Because, well, it’s time.  History’s greatest peacemakers, such as Gandhi, Martin Luther King, and Nelson Mandela, have taught us that peace is never passive. Sometimes those of us who love peace must do more than be living examples of peace. We must act, do, rise up, bang the gong, take to the streets. It’s obvious that now is one of these times. By any peaceful means necessary, we must resist the backdoor decisions and cruel acts of power-mongering politicians and corporate leaders who would create suffering for the world’s citizens, especially the vulnerable and powerless. We must use our voices and vast numbers to stop the madness and bring attention back to the one thing we all share in common: our humanity.

I’m looking forward to seeing the different ways our contributors interpret “Resistance.” I know we will publish thoughtful essays, articles, fiction and poetry, as well as art and photography that illuminates the path forward for us warriors of peace.  I can’t think of a more timely topic or a more important project to be part of.

Submit your work for our summer edition of DoveTales, Resistance, here.


A former senior editor and contributing editor at Outside magazine, Brad Wetzler is an author, journalist, and editor with twenty-plus years’ experience at the highest levels of publishing. His book, Real Mosquitoes Don’t Eat Meat, was published by W.W. Norton’s Countryman Press. He has written hundreds of articles and essays for top publications including The New York Times Magazine and The New York Times Book Review, Newsweek, GQ, Wired, National Geographic, Yoga Journal, Men’s Journal, George, and Outside.. His writing has been anthologized in the Best American Travel Writing series, Outside 25: The Best of Outside Magazine’s First 25 Years, and Traveler’s Tales. He penned Outside’s popular monthly Wildfile column and Universal Press Syndicate’s Adventuring column. He taught nonfiction writing as an associate professor of English at The College of Santa Fe and as a faculty member of The Book Project at Denver’s Lighthouse Writers Workshop. He’s given keynote addresses about writing at the University of Colorado Boulder, New Mexico State University, and other venues. He is the founder and lead book-writing coach at Memoir Academy and Nonfiction Academy. A certified yoga instructor, he teaches vinyasa yoga at Corepower Yoga in Boulder, Colorado. Brad holds a masters’ degree in journalism (magazine writing and publishing) from Northwestern University.


In other W4P News

2020 Youth Summit:

With schools moving online in response to the Covid-19 health emergency, many of our professors who are working very hard to prepare their classes and students for these crisis changes. As a result, the 2020 Youth Summit has been postponed until further notice.

Help Wanted:

Writing for Peace is looking for grant writers with experience in grant writing for literary and youth nonprofits. Contact us at mawlecarmel@gmail.com with “W4P Grant Writing” in the subject heading.

 

Copyright © 2020 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

Celebrating Gardens in the Desert: Cultivating Awareness

DoveTales Online, An International Journal of the Arts, Issue II – February 2020
Guest Edited by Robert Kostuck

Our Winter Edition of DoveTales is live!

Many thanks to our featured writer, E. Ethelbert Miller, and all of our amazing contributors.  Thanks to Phillip Richards for his fascinating essay and interview with Mr. Miller. And our sincere gratitude to Guest Editor Robert Kostuck whose vision and theme made this beautiful journal possible.

And thank you all, our Writing for Peace family, for your patience during the delayed publication, and for your kind messages. We hope you’ll be inspired by this issue of DoveTales. Enjoy!

Celebrating Gardens in the Desert: Cultivating Awareness

Cover Art by Joseph Black

 

Copyright © 2020 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

 

 

Winter DoveTales Postponed

Due to a family emergency, we are postponing the Winter Edition of DoveTales Online. Previously set to go live on February 1st, the journal will now launch on Saturday, February 15th.

Guest Editor Robert Kostuck’s theme for the Winter 2020 DoveTales is “Gardens in the Desert: Cultivating Awareness” and it is shaping up to be an amazing collection of work, including a special interview with poet and activist E. Ethelbert Miller. So set some time aside on Saturday the 15th for contemplation and inspiration. And thanks for your patience.

Keep on writing, keep on speaking out,

Carmel Mawle and the Writing for Peace Board

 

Copyright © 2020 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

Celebrating The New Year with A New DoveTales

Happy New Year Dear Writers for Peace!

We’re excited to announce that our new DoveTales Anthology: One World, One People, guest edited by Adviser Patricia Jabbeh Wesley, Ph.D., is finally available for purchase! This gorgeous book is 240 pages of thought-provoking, enlightening, and inspiring poetry and prose, art and photography. One World, One People, collects all the work published in August from our first online DoveTales, including Writing for Peace advisers, Young Writers Contest Winners, Liberian Young Scholars, and prominent contributors from all across the globe.

We can’t think of a better way to ring in 2020 than with our very first annual Writing for Peace DoveTales Anthology. We hope you all love it as much as we do! You can purchase the anthology now through this link.

Best wishes for a very Happy New Year from all of us at Writing for Peace, and thank you for celebrating with us!

Carmel, and the Writing for Peace Board of Directors

Carmel Mawle is founder of the nonprofit literary organization, Writing for Peace, and has served as Editor-in-Chief of DoveTales, An International Journal of the Arts, since 2013. A Pushcart Nominee, her short stories, essays and poetry have been published in literary journals and anthologies, including Smokelong Quarterly and Shake the Tree Anthology.

Copyright © 2020 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

In The Printer’s Hands

The good news is our DoveTales print anthology is finished, and it’s beautiful240 pages of thought-provoking, enlightening, and inspiring poetry and prose, art and photography.  Our 2019 DoveTales Anthology, One World, One People, collects all the work published in August in our first online DoveTales.  Guest Edited by Patricia Jabbeh Wesley, Ph.D., the book includes advisers, Young Writers Contest Winners, Liberian Young Scholars, and prominent contributors from all across the globe.

The not-so-good news is we have to wait a little longer before the anthology is available for purchase. It’s in the printer’s hands and we hope it will be ready by the end of the week. Unfortunately, it may not make it to your holiday wrapping table in time to be included with your other wonderful gifts. We will let you know as soon as the books can be ordered. Until then, feel free to print and include the above image in a gift card with the promise of the anthology to come. We’re sorry the books weren’t ready sooner, but they are definitely worth the wait!

Wishing you all a glorious holiday season, and hoping the winter weather and current events are conducive to words on the page. Keep on writing for peace.

Carmel, and all of us at Writing for Peace

Carmel Mawle is founder of the nonprofit literary organization, Writing for Peace, and has served as Editor-in-Chief of DoveTales, An International Journal of the Arts, since 2013. A Pushcart Nominee, her short stories, essays and poetry have been published in literary journals and anthologies, including Smokelong Quarterly and Shake the Tree Anthology.

Copyright © 2019 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

 

When Silence is Not An Option, by Carmel Mawle

“We must finally stop appealing to theology to justify our reserved silence about what the state is doing — for that is nothing but fear. ‘Open your mouth for the one who is voiceless’ — for who in the church today still remembers that that is the least of the Bible’s demands in times such as these?”

~Dietrich Bonhoeffer

Deitrich Bonhoeffer (1906-1945), the German author of The Cost of Discipleship and founder of the Confessing Church, attended seminary in New York, where he developed a friendship with Frank Fisher, a black fellow-seminarian from Harlem’s Abyssinian Baptist Church, and was moved and inspired by the Gospel of Social Justice.

As his own Christian conviction was deepened, Bonhoeffer made the decision to return to a Germany increasingly under the sway of Nazism, leaving behind his friends, fiancé and safety, becoming one of its most vocal resisters.

“I have come to the conclusion that I made a mistake in coming to America. I must live through this difficult period in our national history with the people of Germany. I will have no right to participate in the reconstruction of Christian life in Germany after the war if I do not share the trials of this time with my people … Christians in Germany will have to face the terrible alternative of either willing the defeat of their nation in order that Christian civilization may survive or willing the victory of their nation and thereby destroying civilization. I know which of these alternatives I must choose but I cannot make that choice from security.”

He was imprisoned for nearly two years, and ultimately was accused of playing a role in a plot to murder Hitler and hanged. Despite the danger of dissent, Bonhoeffer never hesitated to speak truth to power.

If there is one thing we have seen in the current alignment of power, nationalism, and greed  gaining ground all over this beautiful wounded planet, it is that no theology (or lack thereof) has cornered the market in hypocrisy. There seem to be factions of every faith and philosophy that can find justification within their man-made tenets for cruelty to the voiceless, the powerless.

Here in the United States, there are Christians who cling to isolated stories of persecution in the Middle East, or at home where secularists might have the gall to wish them “Happy Holidays” instead of “Merry Christmas”. They revel in examples of persecution by radical Islamists, ignoring the persecution of Muslims in China, India, Myanmar, Israel, the United States and elsewhere. They choose to focus on the insignificant, rather than see their own hypocrisy in supporting an Administration that treats immigrants and refugees (most of them professed Christians, themselves) inhumanely, even rationalizing the separation of young children from their parents, causing irreparable trauma and harm to their developing psyches.

It’s in this brutal reality, that my grandchildren return to school and autumn colors blend into our mountain palette, and it’s got me thinking about the coming winter edition of DoveTales. Adviser and Guest Editor, Robert Kostuck, has chosen the insightful theme, “Gardens in the Desert: Cultivating Awareness.” What are we, dear Writers of Peace, if not gardeners in the desert?

If Bonhoeffer, in the midst of a nation frothing for death and destruction, could plant seeds of courage and resistance in enough hearts to become a threat to Der Führer – a testament to the power of conviction and words – then what can thousands of us with that same conviction accomplish?

We will create gardens in the desert of social injustice with our words and actions. We will not stand idly by as children are deprived of hope and safety and life. We will not remain silent as our planet is ravaged and the Amazon disappears into flames. This globe is our garden. The refugees and prisoners across its surface are our family. Yours and mine. Silence is not an option.

The reading period for our Winter Edition is open until November 1st. As writers, we cultivate awareness through our words, stanzas and sentences.  Send us your work and together we’ll spread the seeds of social justice and peaceful activism where there is fertile soil and where there is not.

Carmel Mawle is founder of the nonprofit literary organization, Writing for Peace, and has served as Editor-in-Chief of DoveTales, An International Journal of the Arts since 2013. A Pushcart Nominee, her short stories, essays and poetry have been published in literary journals and anthologies, including Smokelong Quarterly and Shake the Tree Anthology.

 


2019 Writing for Peace Online Youth Summit

Now accepting submissions for the Youth Summit here.

Theme: Day By Day, Hand in Hand: Seeing & Creating Peace in Daily Action


Check out DoveTales Online Now ~


Copyright © 2019 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

 

 

DoveTales Online, Issue 1 – August 2019

Our first issue of DoveTales Online is up!

DoveTales, a publication of Writing for PeaceSince 2013, Writing for Peace has invited writers and artists from all over the globe to explore themes within the context of current events. Their responsespoetry, fiction, nonfiction, art and photographytell us something about the nature of humanity. We learn from each other. We share our joys and grief, empathy and compassion, the wisdom of years and youth, and the dream of a world that is healthy and diverse, with equality and justice for every sentient beingwhether or not they can afford political lobbyists. This philosophy resulted in a collection of beautiful print booksOccupied, Contrast, Nature, Family and Cultural Identity, Refugees and the Displaced, and Empathy in Art: Embracing the Otherthat educate, inspire, and challenge us.

We continue this tradition with our new online journal, celebrating the community we have built together, and supporting each other in our efforts to leave this world a better place for future generations—and being online, we can do it with more color, audio and videos!

In this, our first issue of DoveTales Online, you’ll find our 2019 Young Writers Contest Winners, as well as poetry, prose, and visual art that delves into our Guest Editor, Patricia Jabbeh Wesley’s theme: “One World, One People.” If this theme seems incongruous with our daily news, make a cup of tea, get comfortable, and find out what her thought process was in choosing it. Thank you for joining us in the debut of DoveTales, An International Online Journal of the Arts!

Check out DoveTales Online Now ~

 

Copyright © 2019 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.