Category Archives: Friday Live Reading Series

Resistance Released & Dinty W. Moore Reads Friday Live

Resistance is now available in print!

This 8.5 x 11 full color book is Guest Edited by Brad Wetzler and features poet Martín Espada. With 380 pages of poetry, fiction, nonfiction, art and photography by contributors from all over the globe, including our 2020 Young Writers Contest Winners, Resistance is a powerful statement of our First Amendment Rights.

Purchase Resistance Now


Dinty W. Moore Joins Friday Live, Sept 18th at 8pm ET

On September 18th, at 8pm ET, award Winning Author Dinty W. Moore will join us to read from his book The Mindful Writer and discuss parallels between mindfulness training and the path of an artist.

Dinty W. Moore is author of the award-winning memoir Between Panic & Desire, the writing guides The Story Cure and Crafting the Personal Essay, and two books centered on his spiritual journey, The Accidental Buddhist and The Mindful Writer. He has published essays and stories in The Georgia Review, Harper’s, The New York Times Magazine, The Southern Review, and elsewhere. He is founding editor of Brevity, the journal of flash nonfiction, and teaches master classes and workshops across the United States as well as in Ireland, Scotland, Spain, Switzerland, and Mexico. More information can be found at www.dintywmoore.com.

Join Friday Live Zoom
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82848651312?pwd=WDMyamFSTko5ME1lRy94Rm11eGxlUT09
Meeting ID: 828 4865 1312     Passcode: 870607


Watch R.L. Maizes Reading

Photo Credit Adrianne Mathiowetz

If you missed our August 21st Friday Live with author R.L. Maizes, you can watch the watch her reading here.

R.L. Maizes is the author of the novel OTHER PEOPLE’S PETS (Celadon Books, Macmillan) and the short story collection WE LOVE ANDERSON COOPER (Celadon Books). Her stories have aired on National Public Radio and have appeared in Electric Literature’s Recommended Reading. Her essays have been published in The New York Times, The Washington Post, and have aired on NPR.

Maizes was born and raised in Queens, New York, and lives in Boulder County, CO, with her husband, Steve, and her muses: Arie, a cat who was dropped in the animal shelter’s night box like an overdue library book, and Rosie, a dog who spent her first year homeless in South Dakota and thinks Colorado is downright balmy.


Copyright © 2020 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

R.L. Maizes Joins Friday Live Reading

Photo Credit Adrianne Mathiowetz

This Friday, August 21st, at 8pm ET, R.L. Maizes will join Writing for Peace via Zoom to read from her highly acclaimed debut novel, Other People’s Pets, and discuss the development of empathy through creative writing. One of the particular gifts R.L. Maizes brings to her writing, also evident in her earlier short story collection, We Love Anderson Cooper, is the ability to draw the reader deep into the psyches of her characters. We are not only present with her characters as they react to the world around them, but we understand the forces and events that have shaped their lives up to that point. With that understanding, even the most shocking choices evoke empathy and compassion. Join R.L. Maizes this Friday in our Friday Live Reading Series.

About R.L. Maizes

R.L. Maizes is the author of the novel OTHER PEOPLE’S PETS (Celadon Books, Macmillan) and the short story collection WE LOVE ANDERSON COOPER (Celadon Books). Her stories have aired on National Public Radio and have appeared in Electric Literature’s Recommended Reading. Her essays have been published in The New York Times, The Washington Post, and have aired on NPR.

Maizes was born and raised in Queens, New York, and lives in Boulder County, CO, with her husband, Steve, and her muses: Arie, a cat who was dropped in the animal shelter’s night box like an overdue library book, and Rosie, a dog who spent her first year homeless in South Dakota and thinks Colorado is downright balmy. 

Meeting ID: 834 0976 7580
Password: 381108

Join Zoom Reading: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83409767580?pwd=amJwUXA2c3pEMHZ4UWJCdUhOTUZIQT09


Copyright © 2020 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

Two Poems by Peter Balakian for Tonight’s Special Reading

Friday Live Reading with Peter Balakian

Pulitzer Prize Winner Peter Balakian will join us tonight, August 7th, at 8pm Eastern Time, to read from his work and discuss poetry of witness. He asked us to share the poems below so we’ll have a chance to read them in advance of his discussion. “Eggplant” was previously published on May 28, 2018 in The New Yorker. “History, Bitterness” was previously published in Green Mountain Review 30.2. You’ll find the Friday Live Meeting Zoom connection information following Peter Balakian’s brief biography at the bottom of this post. Please help us spread the word and join us tonight for this very special Friday Live Reading.

 
 
EGGPLANT
I loved the white moon circles
and the purple halos,
on a plate as the salt sweat them.
The oil in the pan smoked like bad
days in the Syrian desert—
when a moon stayed all day—
when morning was a purple
elegy for the last friend seen—
when the fog of the riverbank
rose like a holy ghost.
My mother made those white moons sizzle
in some egg wash and salt—
some parsley appeared
from the garden
and summer evenings
came with no memory
but the table with white dishes.
Shining aubergine—black-skinned
beauty, bitter apple.
We used our hands.
—Peter Balakian, New Yorker, May 28, 2018

 
 
HISTORY, BITTERNESS

A phone booth August/ Yaddo/ Saratoga Springs–air
of the Tiffany parlor– sour scent of empty wine bottles,
my friend handed me the sweating receiver: “go ahead—say hello.”
What could I say to James Baldwin who was dying in the south of France.
No name in the street. Paris. Algiers. Little Rock, you can fill it in. . . .
I’m sitting at Café Deux Magots with my NY Yankees umbrella in my lap,
a wide glass of wine from some vineyard of Burgundy in my hand,
recalling that Baldwin sat at Deux Magots drinking scotch all-day and writing
as friends dropped by. And it hits me: just over Pont de Sully my great uncle
sat in a big treaty room of 1919 representing Armenia (did it exist?) in a fancy
hotel with others who hoped for a nation in return for the slaughter.
Baldwin knew Sartre and de Beauvoir, he saw Camus pass by.
It was 1958 and the Algerian cabby who dropped him off drunk
on the curb was half blind from the revolution.
Bang bang bang goes the heart. Mr. Baldwin was dying in a sensual village
in the south of France. After a week at Versailles my uncle came to that hotel room
where in the closet of his head a big white sheet floated over the Black Sea.
What did rape and massacre mean? Fail proof, shattered, bitten off
words that floated over the bridge into the carnival horns of night.
A few months earlier Miles Davis passed Baldwin at Deux Magots
on his way to play for Louie Malle’s Ensensure pour L’escefau—
the spurting air of love love love slipping from the valves —
the spit and breath of night in Paris off the torpid brown
Seine where Paul Celan had disappeared not long before.
Hiss hiss hiss goes the heart. It’s 1958 and Camus still walks
the boulevard–the war in Algeria is daily acid in the river—
What are degrees of separation? Private myths? Illusions?
My aunt the surrealist might call them chance meetings.
Do we invent proximities for our need, for salvation, for love?
Wilson, Clemenceau, Lloyd George names my uncle scrawled
on a map of the dispossessed—on a wall in a hotel of cards
where Dixieland horns played at a banquet for the grand Armée
and the next map of Europe was shuffled with an ace in the hole.
Miles Davis spent 7 hours with Louis Malle making some
languid, piercing, hollow sliding sounds in the indeterminate dank night,
no name on the street stalked him. A few years later Baldwin moved just miles
from where my father was born in Istanbul–a few years after the Armenians
were expunged from Turkey and my grandparents left the ghost map
on the wall. It was 1919 and the flu blew along Saint-Germain where
my grandparents met my uncle that Fall. I knew Baldwin’s heart went hollow,
languid, and sizzled with the need to get out of America; it even led him to
the place my grandparents fled—before they landed a couple miles from Baldwin’s
apartment in Harlem.
Are these degrees of separation? or just my way of thinking about that strange
moment in a phone booth at an artists’ colony in the summer of ’86?
My friend said: “if you love Jimmy’s work, I know he’d love to hear
from you. All good news means a lot especially at the end.”
What could I say to Mr. Baldwin? He’d helped me understand the bitter
history that had trapped me—that was trapped in me.
Istanbul, New York, Paris. No name. No street.
I was sweating into the phone. Mr. Baldwin’s voice was frail but unmistakable.

—Peter Balakian, Green Mountain Review 30.2
 
 

About Peter Balakian

Peter Balakian is the author of seven books of poems most recently Ozone Journal, which won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry, as well as Ziggurat (2010) and June-tree: New and Selected Poems, 1974-2000 (2001). His four books of prose include The Burning Tigris: The Armenian Genocide and America’s Response (2004), won the 2005 Raphael Lemkin Prize and was a New York Times Notable Book and a New York Times Best Seller. His memoir, Black Dog of Fate won the 1998 PEN/Martha Albrand Prize for the Art of the Memoir, and was a best book of the year for the New York Times, the LA Times, and Publisher’s Weekly, and was recently issued in a 10th anniversary edition. He is co-translator of  Girgoris Balakian’s Armenian Golgotha: A Memoir of the Armenian Genocide 1915-1918, (Knopf, 2009), which was a Washington Post book of the year.

He is also the author of a book on the American poet Theodore Roethke and the co translator of the Armenian poet Siamanto’s Bloody News From My Friend. Between 1976-1996 he edited with Bruce Smith the poetry journal Graham House Review.  His prose and essays have appeared in the New York Times Magazine, The Chronicle of Higher Education, Salon, The Daily Beast, Tikkun, The Guardian, LA Times, Art In America, and others.

He is the recipient of many awards and prizes including the Presidential Medal and the Moves Khoranatsi Medal from the Republic of Armenia,  The Spendlove Prize for Social Justice, Tolerance, and Diplomacy (recipients include President Carter), a Guggenheim Fellowship, a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, the Emily Clark Balch Prize for poetry from the Virginia Quarterly Review. He has appeared widely on national television and radio( 60 Minutes, ABC World News Tonight, PBS, Charlie Rose, Fresh Air, etc) , and his work have appeared in a many languages including  Armenian, Bulgarian, French, Dutch, Greek, German, Hebrew, Russian, and Turkish. He is Donald M. and Constance H. Rebar Professor of the Humanities, Professor of English and Director of Creative Writing at Colgate University.

Join Zoom Reading:

Meeting ID: 854 6459 8638 Password: 510847  https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85464598638?pwd=eTlBd1RTYllabUNYTlVwSGdGWU1ndz09


Copyright © 2020 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

Pulitzer Prize Winner Peter Balakian Joins Friday Live Reading

Friday Live Reading Series Welcomes Peter Balakian

This Friday, August 7th, at 8pm ET, Pulitzer Prize winner Peter Balakian will read from his work and discuss poetry of witness.

About Peter Balakian

Peter Balakian is the author of seven books of poems most recently Ozone Journal, which won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry, as well as Ziggurat (2010) and June-tree: New and Selected Poems, 1974-2000 (2001). His four books of prose include The Burning Tigris: The Armenian Genocide and America’s Response (2004), won the 2005 Raphael Lemkin Prize and was a New York Times Notable Book and a New York Times Best Seller. His memoir, Black Dog of Fate won the 1998 PEN/Martha Albrand Prize for the Art of the Memoir, and was a best book of the year for the New York Times, the LA Times, and Publisher’s Weekly, and was recently issued in a 10th anniversary edition. He is co-translator of  Girgoris Balakian’s Armenian Golgotha: A Memoir of the Armenian Genocide 1915-1918, (Knopf, 2009), which was a Washington Post book of the year.

He is also the author of a book on the American poet Theodore Roethke and the co translator of the Armenian poet Siamanto’s Bloody News From My Friend. Between 1976-1996 he edited with Bruce Smith the poetry journal Graham House Review.  His prose and essays have appeared in the New York Times Magazine, The Chronicle of Higher Education, Salon, The Daily Beast, Tikkun, The Guardian, LA Times, Art In America, and others.

He is the recipient of many awards and prizes including the Presidential Medal and the Moves Khoranatsi Medal from the Republic of Armenia,  The Spendlove Prize for Social Justice, Tolerance, and Diplomacy (recipients include President Carter), a Guggenheim Fellowship, a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, the Emily Clark Balch Prize for poetry from the Virginia Quarterly Review. He has appeared widely on national television and radio( 60 Minutes, ABC World News Tonight, PBS, Charlie Rose, Fresh Air, etc) , and his work have appeared in a many languages including  Armenian, Bulgarian, French, Dutch, Greek, German, Hebrew, Russian, and Turkish. He is Donald M. and Constance H. Rebar Professor of the Humanities, Professor of English and Director of Creative Writing at Colgate University.

Join Zoom Reading:

Meeting ID: 854 6459 8638 Password: 510847  https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85464598638?pwd=eTlBd1RTYllabUNYTlVwSGdGWU1ndz09


R.L. Maizes, Photo Credit Adrianne Mathiowetz

Upcoming Friday Live Readers…

Our next Friday Live Reading will be on August 21st with R.L. Maizes, author of the short story collection We Love Anderson Cooper and the novel Other People’s Pets, published by Celadon Books.

September 4th: Award Winning Poet and naturalist James Scott Smith reads from his book, The Expanse of All Things.

September 18th: Award Winning Author Dinty W. Moore will read from his book The Mindful Writer and discuss parallels between mindfulness training and the path of an artist.

Find more information on our Friday Live Readings here.


DoveTales Resistance, Guest Edited by Brad Wetzler, is Online

Be sure to check out our latest online journal, Resistance, Guest Edited by Brad Wetzler. With contributors from all over the globe, our 2020 Young Writers Contest Winners, and our Featured Writer Martín Espada, Resistance is a powerful statement of our First Amendment Rights. Read Resistance now.

 


Copyright © 2020 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

 

Se Eun Pak’s “A Bloody Battle” Nonfiction Finalist and Other W4P News

Read 2020 Young Writers Contest Finalists Pieces In Our July Blog

Congratulations to Se Eun Pak, whose essay “A Bloody Battle” came in as one of two 2020 Young Writers Contest Nonfiction Finalists. Se Eun Pak is in grade 10 at Yongsan International School of Seoul in South Korea. Read her essay in full here.

Friday Live Reading Series

 (photo by David González)

Our last Friday Live Reading, on July 24th, featured Martín Espada who read from his forthcoming book, Floaters, published by W.W. Norton.  Martín Espada is our Featured Writer for the Resistance Edition of DoveTales, An International Journal of the Arts, which launches on August 1st. If you missed his reading, you can watch it here.

Our next Friday Live Reading features Peter Balakian. On Friday, August 7th, at 8pm ET, Pulitzer Prize winner Peter Balakian will read from his work and discuss poetry of witness.

Learn more about Peter Balakian and his work here.

Resistance, Our Summer DoveTales Goes Live August 1st

Brad Wetzler, Guest Editor

As systemic racism and police brutality threaten Black Lives, as nationalism and authoritarianism runs rampant, as the U.S. Homeland Security and Border Patrols turn against American Citizens and detained immigrants, asylum seekers and prisoners of all ages face the Covid-19 virus behind bars, as we are forced to battle disinformation and government apathy during a world pandemic, Resistance is what writers for peace do. Mark August 1st on your calendars to immerse yourself in the powerful work of writers, artists and photographers who remind us that we are all in this together.

As Guest Editor, Brad Wetzler says,

History’s greatest peacemakers, such as Gandhi, Martin Luther King, and Nelson Mandela, have taught us that peace is never passive. Sometimes those of us who love peace must do more than be living examples of peace. We must act, do, rise up, bang the gong, take to the streets. It’s obvious that now is one of these times. By any peaceful means necessary, we must resist the backdoor decisions and cruel acts of power-mongering politicians and corporate leaders who would create suffering for the world’s citizens, especially the vulnerable and powerless. We must use our voices and vast numbers to stop the madness and bring attention back to the one thing we all share in common: our humanity.

Keep writing, keep resisting. Stay safe and well.


Copyright © 2020 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

Finalist Spanarelli’s “I Am” and Martín Espada Reading

Read 2020 Young Writers Contest Finalists Pieces In Our July Blog

Congratulations to Giuliana Spanarelli, whose poem “I Am” came in as one of two 2020 Young Writers Contest Poetry Finalists. Giuliana is in grade 8 at West Essex Middle School in Caldwell, New Jersey. Read Giuliana’s poem, “I Am,” here.

Friday Live Reading Hosts Martín Espada

Tomorrow, July 24th, at 8pm ET, Martín Espada will will read from his forthcoming book, Floaters, published by W.W. Norton.  Find the details here. You won’t want to miss this! Martín Espada is also the Featured Writer for our Resistance Edition of DoveTales, An International Journal of the Arts, which launches on August 1st.

About Martín Espada

Martín Espada (photo by David González)

Martín Espada was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1957. He has published more than twenty books as a poet, editor, essayist and translator. His forthcoming book of poems from Norton is called Floaters. His many honors include the Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize, the Shelley Memorial Award, the Robert Creeley Award, the National Hispanic Cultural Center Literary Award, an American Book Award, an Academy of American Poets Fellowship, the PEN/Revson Fellowship and a Guggenheim Fellowship. The Republic of Poetry was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. His book of essays and poems, Zapata’s Disciple (1998), was banned in Tucson as part of the Mexican-American Studies Program outlawed by the state of Arizona, and reissued by Northwestern University Press. A former tenant lawyer, Espada is a professor of English at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst.


Copyright © 2020 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

Finalist Sophia Fang’s Zongzi, Martín Espada Reading and Other W4P News

Read 2020 Young Writers Contest Finalists Pieces In Our July Blog

Congratulations to Sophia Fang, whose short story “Zongzi” came in as one of two 2020 Young Writers Contest Fiction Finalists. Sophia is in grade 10 at Westview High School in Sandiego, California. Read her short story, “Zongzi,” here.

Friday Live Readings

(Photo by Connie Kuusisto)

If you missed Adviser Stephen Kuusisto’s wonderful reading from his latest book, Have Dog, Will Travel, the recording is available now. Learn how his book, requested by Simon and Schuster, evolved into the lyrical memoir it became. Stephen’s reading touched on his process and activism, the books that influenced his writing and personal growth, and became something of a love poem to his first guide dog, Corky and his wife, Connie. Watch the reading in full here.

(Photo by David González)

Our next Friday Live Reading is on July 24th at 8pm ET with Martín Espada, our DoveTales Resistance Featured Writer. He will read from his new book, Floaters, and discuss his process and activism. Find the details here. You won’t want to miss this!

Martín Espada was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1957. He has published more than twenty books as a poet, editor, essayist and translator. His forthcoming book of poems from Norton is called Floaters. His many honors include the Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize, the Shelley Memorial Award, the Robert Creeley Award, the National Hispanic Cultural Center Literary Award, an American Book Award, an Academy of American Poets Fellowship, the PEN/Revson Fellowship and a Guggenheim Fellowship. The Republic of Poetry was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. His book of essays and poems, Zapata’s Disciple (1998), was banned in Tucson as part of the Mexican-American Studies Program outlawed by the state of Arizona, and reissued by Northwestern University Press. A former tenant lawyer, Espada is a professor of English at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst.

If You Don’t Know Me by Now…

By Adviser E. Ethelbert Miller, in AWP Magazine & Media

Adviser E. Ethelbert Miller

Too many metaphors are missing these days. In their absence, we desperately search for a way of explaining the sudden upheaval in our society. We uproot the past looking for historical clarity. Unfortunately, the future often wears a mask. We are no longer protesting like this is the ’60s. The motion of history has taken us somewhere else. “Where are we?” is as difficult to utter as “Once upon a time.” As writers, our own words and narratives (if we are not careful) can turn against us, and even become suffocating.

Read E. Ethelbert Miller’s entire essay here.

 


Copyright © 2020 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

 

July 10 Friday Live Reading with Stephen Kuusisto

This Friday, July 10th, at 8pm ET, Stephen Kuusisto will read from his latest book, Have Dog, Will Travel, published by Simon & Schuster, and discuss his work, process, and activism. We hope you’ll join us!

Stephen Kuusisto, Photo Credit Connie Kuusisto

About Stephen Kuusisto

Stephen Kuusisto is the author of the memoirs Have Dog, Will Travel; Planet of the Blind (a New York Times “Notable Book of the Year”); and Eavesdropping: A Memoir of Blindness and Listening and of the poetry collections Only Bread, Only Light and Letters to Borges. A graduate of the Iowa Writer’s Workshop and a Fulbright Scholar, he has taught at the University of Iowa, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, and Ohio State University. He currently teaches at Syracuse University where he holds a professorship in the Center on Human Policy, Law, and Disability Studies. He is a frequent speaker in the US and abroad. His website is StephenKuusisto.com.

881 5140 8831
011368

Copyright © 2020 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

June 26, Friday Live with Lyla June, A W4P Reading Series

Join the June 26th Writing for Peace Friday Live Reading with Lyla June Johnston.

Friday, June 26th, at 8pm EDT Click here to join.

Lyla June Johnston (known publicly as Lyla June) will read her essay, “The Story of How Humanity Fell In Love With Itself Once Again,” and discuss her writing process and activism. Learn more about Lyla June and read more of her work here.

Meeting ID: 865 8222 3528
Password: 705037

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86582223528?pwd=L0tURk9vbWtMNlJpZFZocWdMUytwdz09

Lyla June is an Indigenous musician, scholar, and community servant of Diné (Navajo), Tsétsêhéstâhese (Cheyenne) and European lineages. Her dynamic, multi-genre presentation style has engaged audiences across the globe towards personal, collective and ecological healing. She blends studies in Human Ecology at Stanford, graduate work in Indigenous Pedagogy, and the traditional worldview she grew up with to inform her perspectives and solutions. She is currently pursuing her doctoral degree, focusing on Indigenous food systems revitalization.

Lyla June is a student of global cycles of violence that eventually gave rise to The Native American Holocaust and the destruction of many cyclic relationships between human beings and nature. This exploration birthed her passion for revitalizing spiritual relationships with Mother Earth and cultivating spaces for forgiveness and reconciliation to occur between cultural groups.

In 2012, she graduated with honors from Stanford University with a degree in Environmental Anthropology. During her time there she wrote the award winning papers: Nature and the Supernatural: The Role of Culture and Spirituality in Sustaining Primate Populations in Manu National Park, Peru and Chonos Pom: Ethnic Endemism Among the Winnemem Wintu and the Cultural Impacts of Enlarging Shasta Reservoir.

She spends her free time learning her endangered mother tongue, planting corn, beans and squash and spending time with elders who retain traditional spiritual and ecological knowledge.

Meeting:
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86582223528?pwd=L0tURk9vbWtMNlJpZFZocWdMUytwdz09

Meeting ID: 865 8222 3528
Password: 705037

Copyright © 2020 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

Resistance DoveTales, Friday Live Readings, and E. Ethelbert Miller Essay

“Resistance” Deadline Extended

Brad Wetzler, Guest Editor

On Monday, writers submitting their work to be considered for our “Resistance” edition of DoveTales  found that our Submittable account had been closed before the June 15th deadline. Apparently, we received so many submissions that we exceed a maximum that we weren’t aware of. The problem has been remedied, and the deadline has been extended to June 20th. We apologize for the inconvenience. Read our full guidelines here.

Friday Live Reading Series

Adviser Lyla June Johnston

Every other Friday, Writing for Peace hosts an hour long reading and discussion on Zoom. It’s casual and conversational, and we always learn something that inspires us in our own writing. Our next reading will be on June 26th with Lyla June Johnston. An adviser since 2013, Lyla June Johnston is an Indigenous musician, scholar, and community servant of Diné (Navajo), Tsétsêhéstâhese (Cheyenne) and European lineages. Her dynamic, multi-genre presentation style has engaged audiences across the globe towards personal, collective and ecological healing.

Check out our complete author lineup, watch videos of our previous readings, and support our fellow writers by purchasing their work. Go to our Friday Live Reading page here.

America Upside Down

Our country is in the midst of a paradigm shift

By Adviser E. Ethelbert Miller | June 15, 2020

Adviser E. Ethelbert Miller

Social historian Vincent Harding often felt it was best to describe black history as being much like a river, flowing toward freedom and the delta of democracy. The challenge we face today is how to navigate this river. Our inability to do this too often leads us to compare historical incidents and movements to one another. We see a protest or a riot and we immediately compare it to the 1960s. Why should one be surprised by police brutality in the black community? Hasn’t there always been one historical moment flowing into the next?

Read the entire article in The American Scholar here.

Young Writers Contest

The 2020 Young Writers Contest is closed. Announcements will be made in our blog on July 1st, 2020.

Copyright © 2020 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.