Category Archives: Sunday Live Reading

Forgiveness Does Not Preclude Accountability, and Lia Purpura Joins Sunday LIVE

Forgiveness Does Not Preclude Accountability

By Carmel Mawle

“Thoughts and Prayers.”

On the surface, these words may seem heartfelt and well-meaning. But context is everything. “Thoughts and Prayers” spoken vapidly by our representatives in response to mass shootings becomes worse than meaningless. The words become tantamount to “I want to seem caring, but not endanger my funding from the NRA.”

“Unity and Forgiveness.”

Who could oppose “unity and forgiveness?” Here again, it’s all about context. After years of divisive rhetoric, voter suppression, and then (after losing the presidency and control of the Senate) encouraging an armed insurrection to overturn a democratic election, we have to ask why these criminals are now calling on “unity and forgiveness.” Of course, they are appealing to those of us who believe and work toward those values in hopes that they will not face the consequences of their traitorous actions. 

I don’t believe their expropriated words are completely meaningless. “Unity and Forgiveness” is a way forward out of the darkness of these last four years. But before forgiveness there must be accountability. Our president and every representative who perpetuated the lies that encouraged the deadly attack on our United States Capitol must be held accountable. Every news (or entertainment) agency and social media that carried these lies and incendiary language must be held accountable. The police who aided the terrorists, and of course everyone of the terrorists who breached the building should be held accountable. Their prison terms should reflect the damage they have inflicted on our democracy.

One line of thinking about forgiveness is that the guilty party must first repent and ask our forgiveness. And it’s true that does make it easier to forgive. That said, I’m not sure what the odds are that people under the influence of our unrepentant president will ever come to that point.

I’m not an expert on forgiveness, but I’ve found something that usually works for me. It’s more along the lines of “Forgive them, for they know not what they do.” To loosely paraphrase MIT Professor Noam Chomsky, people who have all the facts will generally make the right decision. I believe the majority of people who marched on our capitol were deluded. They believed they were acting as patriots to “stop the steal.” They truly believe that immigrants and people of color are going to destroy the “America” they are uniquely entitled to. For that, I can pity and, in a sense, forgive them. They are the products of a concerted effort to spread lies for financial gain. They know not what they do. I hope they’ll have enough time in prison to see the error of their ways.

For those who knowingly perpetuate those delusions, I have a harder time with forgiveness. Still, I believe that the desire to hoard wealth, no matter who it injures, is another kind of delusion. It is a sickness. And when I think of it in those terms, I find some level of compassion for them. Yes, even forgiveness. Which is not to say that I will not be relieved to see every one of them behind bars. I doubt that they care whether we forgive them or not. Their primary concern is that they won’t face any consequences for their acts of sedition. But for me, for those of us who hope to regain confidence in our democracy, for our own peace of mind, I believe finding a glimmer of forgiveness will help us heal.

Let’s look forward to the new administration and do what needs to be done to find internal balance and peace. Forgiveness is not for those who have injured us, it is for us. Let’s begin the healing process and prepare ourselves for the work that lies ahead. For there will be much. 

Carmel Mawle founded Writing for Peace ten years ago with the idea that creative writing can develop greater empathy and contribute to a more peaceful world. She serves as president of the Board of Directors and writes from her home in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado.

Writing for Peace Welcomes Lia Purpura to Sunday LIVE

Join host Juniper Moon when she welcomes essayist, poet, and translator Lia Purpura to our Sunday LIVE Reading. This Sunday, January 17th at 8pm ET.

Lia Purpura, the award winning essayist, poet, and translator, joins Sunday Live. If we’re lucky, we’ll hear some of her newest work–poems from It Shouldn’t Have Been Beautiful (Penguin) and essays from All the Fierce Tethers (Sarabande Books).

Her awards include Guggenheim, NEA, and Fulbright Fellowships, as well as four Pushcart Prizes, the Associated Writing Programs Award in Nonfiction, and others.  Her work appears in The New Yorker, The New Republic, Orion, The Paris Review, The Georgia Review, Agni, Emergence, and elsewhere. She lives in Baltimore, MD, where she is Writer in Residence at The University of Maryland, Baltimore County. She has taught in the Rainier Writing Workshop’s MFA program, at Breadloaf Writers Conference, The University of Iowa’s Nonfiction MFA program and at conferences, workshops, and graduate programs throughout the country.

Join Sunday LIVE Reading Zoom Meeting at:
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Meeting ID: 875 2664 6096   Passcode: 757763


Copyright © 2021 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

 

 

Don’t Miss Derek Sheffield Tonight On Sunday LIVE

This Sunday, January 10th, at 8pm ET, producer Juniper Moon welcomes poet Derek Sheffield to Sunday LIVE. Invite your friends and join us for some great conversation and inspiration!

Derek Sheffield will be reading from Not for Luck this evening, a collection that reflects simple humanity as one attuned with particularized attention, above and below the surface level tension of a day and a river. Come join us to hear how this attention resonates off the page and reflects one who cares about the steps he’s taking through the world, whether the speaker in the poem or the poet. It’s going to be fabulous.

Derek Sheffield’s collection, Not for Luck, was selected by Mark Doty for the Wheelbarrow Books Poetry Prize. His other books include Through the Second Skin, finalist for the Washington State Book Award, and Dear America: Letters of Hope, Habitat, Defiance, and Democracy, which he coedited with Simmons Buntin and Elizabeth Dodd. He lives on the eastern slopes of the Cascades in Washington and is the poetry editor of Terrain.orgwww.dereksheffield.com

Join Zoom Meeting with Derek Sheffield
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84726807686?pwd=R1lDZkVJRERJZGQwUGl3RjJRMnNkdz09

Meeting ID: 847 2680 7686    Passcode: 137077


Copyright © 2021 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

Derek Sheffield Joins Sunday LIVE, Young Writers Contest Open & Other W4P News

This Sunday, January 10th, at 8pm ET, producer Juniper Moon welcomes poet Derek Sheffield to Sunday LIVE. Invite your friends and join us for some great conversation and inspiration!

Derek Sheffield’s collection, Not for Luck, was selected by Mark Doty for the Wheelbarrow Books Poetry Prize. His other books include Through the Second Skin, finalist for the Washington State Book Award, and Dear America: Letters of Hope, Habitat, Defiance, and Democracy, which he coedited with Simmons Buntin and Elizabeth Dodd. He lives on the eastern slopes of the Cascades in Washington and is the poetry editor of Terrain.orgwww.dereksheffield.com

Join Zoom Meeting with Derek Sheffield
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84726807686?pwd=R1lDZkVJRERJZGQwUGl3RjJRMnNkdz09

Meeting ID: 847 2680 7686    Passcode: 137077

Writing for Peace News

Writing for Peace Tenth Anniversary Celebration

During the month of January, we’re celebrating our Tenth Anniversary with 50% off all our books (while supplies last). To take advantage of this special offer, use the discount code YEAR10.

Check out all our books here.

DoveTales Call for Submissions

Our 2021 DoveTales call is “Letters from the Self to the World.” This is an exciting epistolary issue, guest edited by Adriana Páramo. The deadline is March 1st 2021, and it will be published on May 1st, 2021, both online and in print. Read the full guidelines here.

Young Writers Contest Open

Writing for Peace Young Writers' ContestWriting for Peace challenges young writers (ages 13-19) to expand their empathy skills by researching an unfamiliar culture and writing from the point-of-view of a character within that new world, while exploring social, political, and environmental pressures, and universal themes. The deadline for entrance is March 1st, 2021. Enter to Win our $200 Grand Prize. Check out our full guidelines here.


Copyright © 2021 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

W4P Welcomes Juniper Moon and David L. Ulin Joins SundayLIVE

We are excited to welcome poet and artist Juniper Moon to our Writing for Peace family. Juniper will join our Panel of Advisers and serve as our Artist-in-Residence. Additionally, she is serving as producer of our Sunday LIVE Reading with host Brad Wetzler. We are grateful beyond words for all Juniper brings to Writing for Peace.

Juniper Moon cultivates handwork, as a mom, writer, teaching artist, and letterpress printer. Known to hit the road visiting colleges and school-age camps with co-conspirator Traveling Duende (her 200-pound table top letterpress), she believes in the power of art and handwork to change the world one hand-pulled print at a time. From the Willamette Valley to the Salish Sea, she walks trails and streets with her mini Aussie, Tara, unearthing “home” where the inner and outer worlds meet. The heart of her handwork—writing, carving, drawing, hand-setting type, letterpress printing—beats by the push-pull progression of contrarieties. By defining space and creating through handwork, she identifies and harnesses these life forces as a creative advocate who summons duende and creates a space for the ordinary and ecstatic simpatico on the page.

She has been recognized by numerous fellowships, residencies, and exhibits across the country. Her handwork includes broadsides for poets Alison Hawthorne Deming, Wendell Berry, Jane Hirshfield, and Sam Hamill. Her poems have appeared in Gods, Goddesses, Myth: Regional Women Poets, Floating Bridge Review, City Arts and the Tacoma Arts Museum 20/20: Tacoma in Images and Verse broadside show, and Vox Populi. A graduate of the Evergreen State College, she holds an MFA in Creative Writing from the Rainier Writing Workshop at Pacific Lutheran University. She founded Dwell Press in 2010. Check out her blog at: https://dwellpress.typepad.com and her Instagram at: dwellpress.

Sunday LIVE Reading

On Sunday, December 20th, at 8pm ET, host Brad Wetzler welcomes David Ulin to our Sunday LIVE Reading.

David L. Ulin is the author or editor of a dozen books, including Sidewalking: Coming to Terms with Los Angeles, which was shortlisted for the PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay, and The Lost Art of Reading: Books and Resistance in a Troubled Time. He is the recipient of fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Lannan Foundation, and Black Mountain Institute at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. The former book editor and book critic of the Los Angeles Times, he is an associate professor of English at the University of Southern California, where he edits the literary journal Air/Light.

Join Zoom Meeting: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82898977722


Copyright © 2020 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

Scott Nadelson Joins Sunday LIVE, W4P Holiday Gift Guide, & A Call for Submissions

Sunday LIVE Welcomes Scott Nadelson

On December 13, at 8pm ET, Host Brad Wetzler  welcomes memoirist and short story writer Scott Nadelson to Sunday LIVE.

Join Zoom Meeting: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82898977722

Scott Nadelson is the author of a novel, Between You and Me, a memoir, The Next Scott Nadelson: A Life in Progress, and five story collections, most recently The Fourth Corner of the World, named a Jewish Fiction Prize Honor Book by the Association of Jewish Libraries, and One of Us, winner of the G.S. Sharat Chandra Prize in Short Fiction. A recipient of the Reform Judaism Fiction Prize, the Great Lakes Colleges Association New Writers Award, and an Oregon Book Award, he teaches at Willamette University and in the Rainier Writing Workshop MFA Program at Pacific Lutheran University.

W4P Holiday Gift Guide

During the month of December, Writing for Peace is offering a 10% Discount on all our books. Buy the Complete DoveTales Set (9 beautiful timeless books) at an additional 10% off and receive a free First Amendment Tote Bag. Use the Discount Code Holiday2020 to save on your holiday shopping today!

2020 Books That Make A Powerful Statement for Peace

This 8.5 x 11 full color book is Guest Edited by Robert Kostuck (now our new Editor-In-Chief) and features poet E. Ethelbert Miller. Gardens in the Desert: Cultivating Awareness contains 224 pages of poetry, fiction, nonfiction, art and photography by contributors from all over the globe. Purchase your copy now!

Give the gift of RESISTANCE, Guest Edited by Brad Wetzler, with featured Writer Martín Espada. It’s a powerful expression of our First Amendment Rights, with 380 of poetry, fiction, nonfiction, art and photography by Writers for Peace in every nook and cranny on our beautiful planet.

Special Sale on Writing for Peace Apparel & Accessories

20% off until December 15th. Support Writing for Peace by giving the gift of swag! These beautiful Writing for Peace patterns celebrate our First Amendment Rights and the power or peaceful protest – on bags, T-Shirts and other quality apparel. Check out all our designs at Writing for Peace Swag!

DoveTales Call for Submissions

Reading Period Now Open: November 25th, 2020 – March 1st, 2021

Read full submission guidelines here

Theme: Letters from the Self to the World

The Encyclopedia Britannica defines the word Epistle in straightforward terms: a composition in prose or poetry written in the form of a letter to a particular person or group. It is my hope that you accept this invitation, open your heart, and write your unspoken truths. Send us a letter you never thought you’d write, you know, the one you’ve been toying with for years, or sit down and get that “thing” off your chest that can only start with a cathartic ‘Dear X’. Write to a member of your family, an old flame, a politician, a group of people. It could be a humorous rant, a thank you message, a confession, a belated indictment, a love note, or a message asking for or offering forgiveness.

Whether you write this letter to someone else or yourself (how about a letter to a younger self?), write it with your gut, throat, and knuckles; with tender wrists and beating hearts; with rage and fire and love.

In sum: Write your heart out.

Adriana Páramo is a cultural anthropologist, writer and women’s rights advocate. She is the author of Looking for Esperanza, My Mother’s Funeral, and Unsent Letters to My Mother. Her essays have appeared in multiple literary magazines and been noted in The Best American Essays for consecutive years. She teaches creative nonfiction writing in the low-residency MFA program at Fairfield University. Currently, she writes from the Middle East, where oddly enough, she works as a yoga and fitness instructor.


Copyright © 2020 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

Cynthia Atkins Joins Sunday LIVE

Join us tonight, December 6th, at 8pm ET when host Brad Wetzler  welcomes Cynthia Atkins to our Sunday LIVE Reading!
Cynthia Atkins is the author of Psyche’s Weathers, In The Event of Full Disclosure (CW Books), Still-Life With God (Saint Julian Press 2020).  Her work has appeared in numerous journals, including Alaska Quarterly Review, BOMB, Cleaver Magazine, Diode, Florida Review, Green Mountains Review, Rust + Moth, North American Review, Seneca Review, Thrush, and Verse Daily. Atkins was formerly the assistant director for the Poetry Society of America, and has taught English and Creative Writing, most recently, at Blue Ridge Community College, where she curated a quarterly reading Series, Lit-Salon. She is an Interviews Editor for American Microreviews and Interviews.  Atkins earned her MFA from Columbia University and has earned fellowships and prizes from Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, The Writer’s Voice, and Writers@Work. Atkins lives on the Maury River of Rockbridge County, Virginia, with artist Phillip Welch and their family.  For more information visit her website  www.cynthiaatkins.com

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Copyright © 2020 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

Katie Arnold Joins Sunday LIVE, Tonight at 8pm ET

Sunday LIVE Host Brad Wetzler on Tonight’s Guest, Katie Arnold

Tonight, Writing for Peace Sunday Live welcomes memoirist and journalist Katie Arnold.  

I couldn’t be more excited to have Katie on the show. She will read from her memoir Running Home as well as from her various published essays.

I did the math this morning, and I realized that I’ve known Katie for 25 years. We got to know each other during our shared involvement with the editing and publishing of “Into Thin Air,” the longform magazine article by Jon Krakauer, which ran in Outside in the fall of 1996. Then, I was a 30-year-old editor working on the biggest assignment of my young career. Meanwhile, Katie was a twenty-something fact-checker with the near-impossible task of verifying Krakauer’s incredible account of the deadly storm on Mount Everest that took the lives of 10 people. I say, nearly impossible because the minds of EVERYBODY involved in the story,  including Krakauer, was compromised by hypoxia and trauma. During the month that that story came together, Katie appeared at my office door dozens of times a day with new revelations, facts, twists, and wrinkles in that ground-breaking, tragic adventure story. Together, we got through that experience, and we both went on to have careers as editors and magazine writers. Flash forward 25 years, and Katie, now an author, mother of two girls, an elite ultra-distance runner, and a Zen Buddhist, is at work on her second book. I am curious to talk with her about all of it. I’m especially curious to hear her thoughts on how writing helped her heal the grief of the loss of her father, how running and meditation fuel her creativity. I also hope to hear more about her strong belief that we, kids especially, need time in wild places in order to thrive and feel connected to ourselves and our world.  We will also get a peek into her next book, which she is currently writing. It promises to be an extraordinary night of storytelling and reflection. I hope to see you on Zoom with us at 8 pm ET, 5 pm PT. 

Join Zoom Meeting: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82898977722

Sunday Live Host Brad Wetzler

Sunday LIVE Host Brad Wetzler is an author, journalist, editor, and teacher. A former senior editor at Outside and former contributing editor at George and National Geographic Adventure magazines, Wetzler traveled the world writing articles about far-ranging topics including politics, exploration, the environment, travel, and sport. His articles have appeared in The New York Times Magazine, The New York Times Book Review, Wired, GQ, National Geographic, Men’s Journal, Yoga Journal, Travel + Leisure, the Best American Travel Writing series, and many other publications. He is a former columnist for Outside and Universal Press Syndicate, and his book, Real Mosquitoes Don’t Eat Meat, was published by W.W. Norton’s Countryman Press. He is working on a travel memoir about faith, yoga, and the psychology of spiritual seeking. He lives in Boulder, Colorado, where he writes, edits, teaches yoga, and hikes the Front Range with his dog Tommy.

About Katie Arnold:

Katie Arnold is a contributing editor and former managing editor at Outside Magazine, where she worked on staff for 12 years. She created and launched the popular Raising Rippers column, about bringing up adventurous kids, which appears monthly on Outside Online and has grown to become one of the site’s most popular blogs. Her 2014 story “Don’t Let Youth Sports Hijack Your Life” was one of the most-read posts on Outside Online. Her 2018 essay in Outside Magazine, “Want a Strong Kid? Encourage Play, Not Competition,” was nominated for a National Magazine Award in service journalism.

In addition to Outside, her stories have appeared in The New York Times, Men’s JournalESPN the MagazineMarie ClaireRunner’s WorldElle, and Sunset, among others. Her long-form profiles have been named runner-up in The Best American Sports Writing 2008 and nominated for a Western Publishing Association magazine award, and her essays have been anthologized in Woman’s Best Friend, Another Mother Runner, and P.S. What I Didn’t Tell you. She is co-author of the blog Writing from the Nest., and she edited the photography book, Rio Grande: An Eagle’s View, published by WildEarth Guardians.

Katie has been awarded prestigious literary fellowships at the Ucross Foundation in Wyoming and the MacDowell Colony in New Hampshire, where she was named the Robert and Stephanie Olmsted Fellow in 2016. She has been featured on NPR Weekend Edition Sunday, as well as on Ultrarunner Podcast and the Upaya Zen Center Podcast, among others. She has three times been a guest lecturer at Colorado College’s “Writing Wild: Literary Journalism of the Outdoors” course, and teaches writing workshops exploring the link between movement and creativity.

An elite ultra runner, Katie is the 2018 women’s champion of Leadville Trail 100 Run, where she finished 11th overall in field of more than 700 runners. She won the 2018 Jemez Mountains 50 Mile, 2014 TransRockies 3-Day Trail Run, Jemez Mountains 50K, the Mount Taylor 50K. She is a two-time overall champion and course record holder at the  Angel Fire 100K. Katie is a sponsored athlete for GU Energy Labs and Balega Socks. As part of her ongoing effort to encourage young athletes, she founded a children’s trail running club, gives motivational talks, and coaches girls’ lacrosse in Santa Fe.

Katie lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico, with her husband, Steve Barrett, their two daughters and two dogs. In her spare time, she likes to ride her bike, ski, go on river trips, hike, write fiction, and read. A restless and fledging student of Zen, she is slowly learning to sit still, but she’s happiest outside in motion. As the poet Mary Oliver once said, “I don’t like to be indoors.”

Running Home is her first book.

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Copyright © 2020 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

Sunday LIVE Welcomes William O’Daly, Tonight at 8pm ET

William O’Daly Joins Sunday Live

This Sunday, November 22 at 8:00 pm ET, Join Host Brad Wetzler when he welcomes poet, essayist and translator William O’Daly to our weekly Sunday Live Reading. Come and learn about the crossroads between water and poetry with this poet dedicated to the future of California’s water.

William O’Daly has translated eight books of the late-career and posthumous poetry of Chilean Nobel laureate Pablo Neruda, and most recently Neruda’s first volume, Book of Twilight, a finalist for the 2018 Northern California Book Award in Translation. All nine Neruda translations are published by Copper Canyon Press. O’Daly’s books of poems include The Whale in the Web, also published by Copper Canyon, as well as The Road to Isla Negra (2015), Water Ways (2017, a collaboration with JS Graustein), and Yarrow and Smoke (2018), the latter three published by Folded Word Press. A National Endowment for the Arts Fellow, O’Daly was a finalist for the 2006 Quill Award in Poetry. A four-time Pushcart Prize nominee, his poems, translations, essays, and reviews have been published in numerous journals and as part of multimedia exhibits and performances. He has received national and regional honors for literary editing and instructional design and has served on the national board of Poets Against War. Currently, he is Lead Writer for the California Water Plan, the Golden State’s strategic plan for sustainably managing water resources. Visit his website for further information and sample poems, essays, and interviews.

Join Zoom Meeting: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82898977722


Be sure to order your copy of RESISTANCE, Guest Edited by Brad Wetzler, with featured Writer Martín Espada. It’s a powerful expression of our First Amendment Rights. It always  makes me so happy to send our DoveTales all over the world, but I have to say one of the highlights for me this year was mailing copies of RESISTANCE to Russia. It does my heart good to know there are Writers for Peace in every nook and cranny on our beautiful planet.


Copyright © 2020 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

Gardens In The Desert, William O’Daly Joins Sunday Live

Carmel Mawle, W4P President

November, in the U.S., is traditionally the month of gratitude. Good news has been little and far between for the last few years and it is a strange dichotomy between the suffering and sadness of separation and loss during this pandemic, and the new hope on the horizon. Science, despite all news to the contrary, seems to be winning out in the end. The assault on our First Amendment Rights has bruised but not broken us. The incoming administration is not perfect, but it does seem to be focused on the environment and correcting the unthinkable injustices endured by families seeking refuge, citizens battered and killed by the police hired to protect us all, the for-profit prison system, and a healthcare system designed to profit off the suffering and vulnerability of citizens at their mercy. The list goes on and on,  but there is a light at the end of the tunnel. We hope children who have been detained for months or longer will be reunited with their families soon. New immunizations seem promising and, if not this holiday season, we also hope to be able to come together again soon. For now, we have Zoom, which has been a blessing to our international organization, bringing members together virtually to learn and grow and be inspired through our Sunday Live Readings, Hosted by Brad Wetzler.

At Writing for Peace, we truly have much to be grateful for. Last week, I shared with you the wonderful news about Robert Kostuck accepting the position of Editor-in-Chief of DoveTales. He’s already hard at work on our next DoveTales, but I know he’ll want to tell you about that himself soon. I am finishing up the last details of publishing our print copy of GARDENS IN THE DESERT: CULTIVATING AWARENESS, Winter Edition 2020, Issue II. Robert Kostuck was the Guest Editor for this beautiful book, and the amazing E. Ethelbert Miller was our featured writer. The print copy will be available for ordering on December 1st, in plenty of time for your holiday shopping.

In the meantime, be sure to order your copy of RESISTANCE, Guest Edited by Brad Wetzler, with featured Writer Martín Espada. It’s a powerful expression of our First Amendment Rights. It always  makes me so happy to send our DoveTales all over the world, but I have to say one of the highlights for me this year was mailing copies of RESISTANCE to Russia. It does my heart good to know there are Writers for Peace in every nook and cranny on our beautiful planet.

Read on to learn about William O’Daly, Host Brad Wetzler’s guest this weekend on Sunday LIVE. I hope you can join us!

Stay safe and well, and keep on writing!
Carmel

William O’Daly Joins Sunday Live

This Sunday, November 22 at 8:00 pm ET, Join Host Brad Wetzler when he welcomes poet, essayist and translator William O’Daly to our weekly Sunday Live Reading.

William O’Daly has translated eight books of the late-career and posthumous poetry of Chilean Nobel laureate Pablo Neruda, and most recently Neruda’s first volume, Book of Twilight, a finalist for the 2018 Northern California Book Award in Translation. All nine Neruda translations are published by Copper Canyon Press. O’Daly’s books of poems include The Whale in the Web, also published by Copper Canyon, as well as The Road to Isla Negra (2015), Water Ways (2017, a collaboration with JS Graustein), and Yarrow and Smoke (2018), the latter three published by Folded Word Press. A National Endowment for the Arts Fellow, O’Daly was a finalist for the 2006 Quill Award in Poetry. A four-time Pushcart Prize nominee, his poems, translations, essays, and reviews have been published in numerous journals and as part of multimedia exhibits and performances. He has received national and regional honors for literary editing and instructional design and has served on the national board of Poets Against War. Currently, he is Lead Writer for the California Water Plan, the Golden State’s strategic plan for sustainably managing water resources. Visit his website for further information and sample poems, essays, and interviews.

Join Zoom Meeting: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82898977722


Copyright © 2020 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

Radical Open-heartedness, Ashley M. Jones Joins Sunday Live

Sunday Live Host Brad Wetzler

Today, I woke up and re-listened to President-Elect Joe Biden’s speech from last night. I was struck by how reasonable and measured he sounded. How open he is to listening to and leading all Americans. How ready he is to be the facilitator-in-chief of real healing. At first, his words and measured tone sounded radical. And given these polarized times, they are. Until healing happens, kindness, acceptance, open-heartedness will likely continue to seem to be radical ideas. Given this extraordinary moment, it seems fitting that our guest tonight on Writing for Peace Sunday LIVE is poet Ashley M. Jones. Her poems embody her love for the people of this country–North, South, East, West–as much as they are spirited calls for change, growth, and healing. A black American, a native of Alabama, Ashley is a bright, bright light who is not afraid to shine on darker places, whether within herself or at the systemically racist parts of her native South and the whole of America. I hope you’ll join me tonight at 8 pm ET, 5 pm PT for a reading of poems and a lively discussion about art, politics, the power of words, love, and more.

On Sunday, November 8th, at 6pm MT, award-winning poet Ashley M. Jones joins host Brad Wetzler for our Sunday Live Reading.

Ashley M. Jones holds an MFA in Poetry from Florida International University, and she is the author of Magic City Gospel (Hub City Press 2017) dark / / thing (Pleiades Press 2019)and REPARATIONS NOW! (Hub City Press 2021). Her poetry has earned several awards, including the Rona Jaffe Foundation Writers Award, the Silver Medal in the Independent Publishers Book Awards, the Lena-Miles Wever Todd Prize for Poetry, a Literature Fellowship from the Alabama State Council on the Arts, the Lucille Clifton Poetry Prize, and the Lucille Clifton Legacy Award. She was a finalist for the Ruth Lily Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Fellowship in 2020. Her poems and essays appear in or are forthcoming at CNN, POETRY, The Oxford American, Origins Journal, The Quarry by Split This Rock, Obsidian, and many others. She teaches at the Alabama School of Fine Arts, she co-directs PEN Birmingham, and she is the founding director of the Magic City Poetry Festival.   

Meeting ID: 828 9897 7722

Copyright © 2020 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.