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2019 Announcements

41716478_541593026272917_3315322037882322944_n (2)Hello friends,

We have some big changes to tell you about! Our Board of Directors is working to make Writing for Peace more accessible to readers all over the globe and whittle away at geographic and language barriers. Coming highlights include:

DoveTales, An International Journal of the Arts

Writing for Peace has published six beautiful print journals, but in 2019, DoveTales is going online. We will publish two issues per year, February 1st and August 1st. You can find the Guidelines here.

2019 Youth Summit

We are inviting translations this year, and working to achieve multilingual participation. The theme for this year’s Youth Summit is “Day By Day, Hand in Hand: Seeing & Creating Peace in Daily Action.” The online event will be held on Saturday, October 12, 2019, 8am-6pm EST and is limited to 50 participants. Submissions must be received by September 15th, 2019. Learn more, here.

2019 Young Writers Contest

Our Young Writers contest is up and running! Winners will be published on August 1st, 2019, in our first online DoveTales, guest edited by Writing for Peace Adviser Patricia Jabbeh Wesley. Check out the Contest Guidelines here.

You’ll see lots of other changes this year, and we’ll keep you apprised of developments along the way. We’re looking forward to sharing an exciting 2019 with you!

Yours in peace,

Carmel

Carmel Mawle is president and founder of Writing for Peace. She writes from the northern Colorado Rocky Mountains where she lives with her husband and Max, a ten-pound border terrier mix who firmly believes he’s a mountain dog. You can find her blog at www.carmelmawle.com.

Copyright © 2019 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

The Giving Season

“Through education and creative writing, Writing for Peace seeks to cultivate the empathy that allows minds to open to new cultural views, to value the differences as well as the hopes and dreams that unite all of humanity, to develop a spirit of leadership and peaceful activism.”

~Writing for Peace Mission Statement

Carmel-Laughing-1It’s almost December, the “Giving Season,” and I’m consumed with which size Legos I should buy for my 4-year-old grandson, all my grandchildren’s ever-changing clothing sizes, and what to get for the older males on my list who seem to already have everything I can think of. A gift certificate to one of the chain restaurants? Belly-dancing lessons?

The looming specter of December 31st brings out the flip-side of this month of giving – the asking.  My inbox is full of requests from nonprofit organizations, many of them desperate for the funds to continue much needed services, or to begin life-changing programs.

I’ve worked for three 501c3 nonprofits, and have always struggled to ask for financial help. When I was director of a youth orchestra, we were fortunate to have an extensive donor list. My job was to remind them of the many benefits of music for developing minds, the increased college acceptances and scholarship rates, the services and opportunities we provided to our musicians, and the cost of these programs, which didn’t come close to what we brought in through student tuition income. I wrote the letters and program asks from the bottom of my heart, and even occasionally stood on a stage and made the appeal directly, a task I absolutely dreaded. But this is the nature of running a nonprofit, and I did it because I believed we were making a difference in the lives of those young people, and our community as a whole. That was true when I was president of a chamber music association and, even more so, true today with Writing for Peace.

Because I see first hand what our need is, Writing for Peace is at the top of my husband’s and my giving list. There are other important causes we divvy out our end-of-the-year donations to (Doctor’s Without Borders among them), but the Writing for Peace mission seems imperative to me. If we can’t afford the latest super-cool sneakers for our grandchildren, maybe we can leave them a world that is a little bit kinder.

So, yes, despite my aversion to “the ask,” I’m doing it today because I know what depends on it. I owe it to our young writers, and all of our Writing for Peace family, to do what has always been difficult for me.

Our administration is board operated, and all directors and advisers work on a volunteer basis, so 100% of contributions go to support our mission. Writing for Peace is a 501c3 nonprofit corporation, Federal Tax ID Number, 45-2968027. You can donate directly here.

If you are able to set a little aside for Writing for Peace, thank you. And, whether you’re able to contribute financially, or not, we appreciate all you do for us, for each other, and for a better world.

Wishing you and yours joy this holiday season.

With love and appreciation,

Carmel

Carmel Mawle is president and founder of Writing for Peace. She writes from the northern Colorado Rocky Mountains where she lives with her husband and Max, a ten-pound border terrier mix who firmly believes he’s a mountain dog. You can find her blog at www.carmelmawle.com.

Copyright © 2018 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

Thanksgiving Wishes

carmel and maxDear Writing for Peace Family,

I’m thinking this morning about all of you, our wonderful directors, inspiring advisers, and amazing contributors, Young Writers and readers, with gratitude.

There are times (especially in the last two years) when discouragement takes on a life of its own, much like the cartoon characters with black clouds hovering over their heads day after day as they go about their business. What they don’t have that we do is the community, support, and encouragement of each other.

I can never feel discouraged for long when I think of all of you, approaching each day with an emphasis not on what you can’t accomplish, but what you can. You chip away at seemingly insurmountable obstacles, smile at neighbors and strangers, and do your civic duties with diligence and good cheer. The work created in this spirit adds light and wisdom to our collective consciousness and humanity as a whole, making hope a beautiful and tangible thing.

From all of us at Writing for Peace, many thanks for your ongoing support and all that you do to make this world a better place. Whether you are in the U.S. or elsewhere on this exquisite globe, we wish you a very Happy Thanksgiving.

Much love and appreciation,

Carmel

Carmel Mawle is president and founder of Writing for Peace. She writes from the northern Colorado Rocky Mountains where she lives with her husband and Max, a ten-pound border terrier mix who firmly believes he’s a mountain dog. You can find her blog at www.carmelmawle.com.

Copyright © 2018 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

In This Moment, by Lacey Knight

In This Moment

By Lacey Knight

Lacey KnightI was in a waiting room this morning, my 18-month-old on my lap, when I realized the television was tuned to Dr. Christine Blasey Ford’s testimony before the senate panel. As I intently read the subtitles, a young woman walked in and sat directly across from me. She was young and beautiful, conservatively dressed, and appeared quite self-possessed. I was suddenly self-conscious of my dirty hair, “mom” clothes, and the clearness with which I wear my emotions. I felt vulnerable sharing this moment with a stranger who, in my quick “analysis,” struck me as impermeable.

Still, I was drawn to the interview of this brave woman speaking her truths to our country. It opened a place in me that, in recent years, has been opened again and again. Her words shined a light on dark areas of my personal history. Watching her was painful, knowing that so many discredited her already. Knowing that she’ll suffer greatly for her courage. Knowing that my daughters are going to live in a time where woman are guilty until proven innocent.

My name was called and I snapped back to the waiting room, looking over sheepishly as I remembered my company. The young woman was leaning towards the T.V., her hands clasped together, the exact same look of pain streaked across her face as I know I’d been wearing on mine. She caught my eye as I stood and nodded to me, acknowledging what we had both shared.

In that moment, I wanted to shield her from the world and its harsh judgments; I wanted to hug her; I wanted to be her mom, a safe place for her. I felt extreme gratitude for Dr. Ford and her bravery. Gratitude to all those who continue to give a voice to the trauma and abuse while so many suffer in silence. Gratitude that this moment of truth was heard. Gratitude that my daughters will have champions of their own to lead them through their journeys, and gratitude that my heart was softened by it.

Thank-you, Dr. Ford.

 

Lacey Knight is a mom of three, business owner and a lover of words. She currently expresses herself through journaling, social media, coloring books and the occasional HR paperwork. As a woman business owner with an all female staff and mother to two daughters, she believes passionately in women empowering women and the power of strong community.

 

Copyright © 2018 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

Let’s Catch Up!

41716478_541593026272917_3315322037882322944_n (2)While our blog has been quiet, our board and contributors have been busy. There has been much activity on our Writing for Peace Facebook page. If you haven’t had a chance to check out our 2018 DoveTales Book Launch Celebration, you’re really missing something. The vine readings are absolutely wonderful. You can go straight to our video library on the page, but we’ll also have them on our site in the next couple of weeks. We still have several promised vines from contributors and board members. We’ll keep posting them as long as they keep coming in!

Developments among migrant and refugee communities have been heartbreaking. Detained children continue to be separated from their parents at unprecedented numbers. Many of our writers are actively resisting these (and so many other) injustices. Thank you for your work, and please continue to keep us posted on your progress and stamina. Let us know how our community can support your work.

Our thoughts are with those in the path of the hurricane. Wishing you safety from the storm.

In peace,

Carmel Mawle
President and Founder
mawlecarmel@gmail.com

In Memoriam, Sam Hamill (1943-2018)

Happier times with Sam Hamill. From left to right, Phillip Richards, Sam Hamill, Carmel Mawle, and Lorraine Currelley

Happier times: (Left to right) Phillip Richards, Sam Hamill, Carmel Mawle, and  Lorraine Currelley.

In Memoriam, Sam Hamill (1943-2018)

By Carmel Mawle

Sam once told me that he thought I’d move away from writing prose. Our flights had been delayed after his reading in New York, and he’d seen a short verse I’d written for my daughter. “You’re a poet,” he said. “You just haven’t accepted it, yet.”

Coming from anyone else, I would have long ago forgotten those words. Sam was down-to-earth and approachable, but despite his lack of pretension, his contribution to the art of poetry, to the collective body of literature, and to peace activism is unparalleled. I listened to Sam, and though we had our occasional differences, I often came around to his way of seeing things. Sam always gave me the time to do that. He was one of our earliest advisers, a mentor, and a friend.

When a man like Sam Hamill dies, there should be a collective pause, a contemplative stillness. Of course, it doesn’t happen. The sun sets, and rises again, and those of us whose lives were transformed by Sam (and we are so many), are left with both an ending and a beginning.

For us, there must be a quiet moment to breathe in the cold air of this new reality – a world without Sam – and then we’ll need to gather ourselves and begin again, to continue onward without him. Through his life and writings, he left us a well-lit path. It will be our life-time task to follow it, in as many ways as we are individuals. Sam would want that for us.

I’m still writing prose – the stories he knew I would have to write – but it’s possible I’ll come around to his way of seeing things. He’s given me plenty of time.

(Photograph by Ian Boyden, 2017)

(Photograph by Ian Boyden, 2017)

Sam Hamill Official Obituary [September 5, 1943 – April 14, 2018]

When the first poetry books from Copper Canyon Press went on sale in 1972, they were revelatory showing that the humble technology of the book could be, and indeed should be, an artifact of craftsmanship itself. Copper Canyon elevated the publishing of poetry books to an art of intrinsic beauty as exemplars of the printer’s craft. One of the driving forces behind this new guild craftsmanship was poet, editor, publisher, translator and fine printer Sam Hamill who died at his home in Anacortes, WA on April 14, 2018. Mr. Hamill was 74.

Arguably no one did more for the art of poetry in all its manifestations in the latter half of the 20th century and early 21st than Mr. Hamill. Born to a carnival fry cook at the end of WWII, Hamill was put up for adoption at the age of three by a father who felt the carnival life was no place for a child. Hamill grew up in Utah, the adopted son of educated poultry farmers who had a deep love of literature and history. As such, the young orphan was steeped in the language and poetry of Shelley, Wordsworth, Keats, and Frost by the time he reached puberty. As Hamill has said in interviews, his adopted father would lull him to sleep night after night reading the canonical poems of the English language. These would stay with him for the rest of his life.

Growing up in a home where poetry was spoken out loud, Hamill in later years insisted poetry should always begin in the ear as a spoken form imbued with the rhythm of the heart. He distrusted poems that clearly came into being on the soulless medium of a computer screen with spellcheck. The many recordings of his spoken poetry on CD and tape attest to this resonant craftsmanship that began in his tympanum as a child. Hamill has been praised by his peers for having one of the finest reading voices for poetry in the English language.

In 1973, Hamill garnered a $500 award for editorial excellence for his work on the student paper at University of California Santa Barbara. Poet Kenneth Rexroth, who taught there, had taken Hamill under his wing after the younger poet ran away from home in his late teens to find his place in the poetic renaissance of the Beats on the West Coast. With prize money in hand, Hamill became the Founding Editor of Copper Canyon Press. Tree Swenson (subsequently director of the Academy of American Poets and Hugo House) and poet, translator, author and friend, William O’Daly were co-founders.

Jim Harrison has said: “Hamill has reached the category of a National Treasure though I’d doubt he’d like the idea.” This doubtless pertains because Hamill was by his own admission forever the outsider in the high-status world of Pulitzer Prizes and academic accolades. He never sought employment in academia, instead taught in prisons. He held fast to the belief that poetry was a sacred craft irrespective of the newest trends lauded by East coast taste setters. Copper Canyon in its heyday, from the early 1970s through to the latter 1990s, published some of the finest poets in any language, including David Lee, Olga Broumas, William Stafford, Jaan Kaplinski and Nobel Laureate Pablo Neruda, in crafted books that were singularly beautiful. Its catalog was always eclectic, unique, revelatory. It is perhaps as publisher and editor at Copper Canyon Press that Hamill made his enduring mark. Hamill has been credited with single-handedly resurrecting the careers of such masters as Hayden Carruth, Thomas McGrath, and latterly Kenneth Rexroth in the seminal work in one volume, The Collected Poems of Kenneth Rexroth (2003), which Hamill meticulously co-edited. Poets across the spectrum remain indebted to Hamill for how assiduously he championed them in their formative years. He was also a renowned letterpress printer and it infused every aspect of his work.

Hamill published four books of literary prose, seventeen books of poetry, alongside many well-regarded translations and innumerable broadsides. His early collected works, Destination Zero 1970-1995, garnered sincere praise from such luminaries as W.S. Merwin, Donald Hall and Denise Levertov. Indeed, he has been acclaimed worldwide for the lyricism of his poems, perhaps nowhere with more enthusiasm than in Latin America. His poems unfold in the direct language of the spoken word, with a clear eye to the natural world. Stripped of artifice or academic embellishment, these poems have been acknowledged as some of the finest by a minor poet in the American literary canon. He was also an able and respected translator from many languages, and his translations of the great Asian poets such as Du Fu, Li Po, and Wang Wei, and latterly haiku masters such as Basho and Issa, have never been superseded. As for Hamill’s translation of the Tao Te Ching, it is said that the: “extraordinary strength is that it has captured the poetry of Lao Tzu’s original without sacrificing the resonance of the text’s many meanings and possible interpretations.”

After an invitation to the White House in the winter of 2003 by then First Lady Laura Bush, Hamill publicly renounced the invitation and founded the organization Poets Against War (PAW), which sought to use poetry to oppose the Iraq War. Within a year, many thousands of poets had published anti-war poems on the PAW website, and a bestseller of selected poems was put out by The Nation Press under the same name. It inspired a worldwide movement of films and festivals dedicated to the poetry of pacifism. While this act of literary rebellion put Hamill squarely in the national zeitgeist, in later years he was to lament that PAW seemed to overshadow his lifelong vow to the art of poetry, to his own work as a fine poet, translator, publisher and printer. Overlooked were his twelve years as editor at the American Poetry Review or that he had served thirty years with the Port Townsend Writer’s Conference in Washington, including 10 years as their Director. In the wake of his nationally covered protest, the east coast establishment seemingly ignored all this modest poet had done for poetry spanning a fifty-five year career. To the end of his productive life, Hamill remained a fiercely independent and outspoken poet.

Hamill’s quiet generosity transformed the lives of many individuals. He never hesitated to help those in need, whether it was a gift of knowledge, time or means.

Hamill received many honors and awards, including NEA, Guggenheim, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, The Lila Wallace – Reader’s Digest Fund, and Woodrow Wilson Foundation fellowships, The Stanley Lindberg Lifetime Achievement Editor’s Award from the Rainier Writing Workshop – Pacific Lutheran University, Lifetime Achievement Award in Poetry from the Washington Poets Association, two Washington State Governor’s Writers Day Awards, the First Amendment Award from PEN USA, a US Japan Friendship Commission Fellowship, and was awarded the Decoración de la Universidad de Carabobo in Venezuela. Hamill is predeceased by his wife of many years, the painter and artist Gray Foster.

Hamill is survived by his daughter, Eron Hamill and her husband Roger Mah of Richmond, BC and by his partner, Juniper White. As Hamill wrote in his introductory poem of Destination Zero: “It is enough, perhaps/ to say – We live here/ And let it go at that.” In the case of this wise poet, a poignant truth.

Copyright © 2018 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

Speak Out for the Right Reasons, by Kira Marshall-McKelvey

“When we’re constantly feeling good about ourselves, putting our altruism on our CVs, how selfless an act is it really?”

Speak Out for the Right Reasons

By Kira Marshall-McKelvey

I am a member of Colorado State University Speakout! program, a community that facilitates weekly writing workshops with incarcerated and at-risk youth populations. I have been participating in these workshops at the Larimer County Jail with fellow students since January, and have been amazed, inspired, and in awe of the work that comes out of these workshops. I am delightedly envious of the poetry that seems to slide off the tongues of these writers, and inspired by their bravery in telling difficult, heart-wrenching stories with such grace and poise. While it may sound cliché, the lessons I have learned about rhyme schemes, writing from the heart, and tempo have come from Wednesday nights at the jail.

As we charge towards the end of the semester, however, I must take a step back and consider why I’m doing this work, and who is truly benefitting from these workshops. At a Speakout! training a few months ago, the guest speaker reminded us that the bar is set tremendously low for volunteers—we are blindly accepted as do-gooders, as inspirational, as selfless.

When we’re constantly feeling good about ourselves, putting our altruism on our CVs, how selfless an act is it really?

This is not a Speakout!-specific problem—there is a certain danger to embodying, or even accepting, the holier-than-thou identity that can come with volunteer work. There are troubling power dynamics associated with the idea that we, the volunteers, are bestowing our knowledge and wisdom on “the Other.” When we say we want to empower others by giving them a voice—but leave the jail with a “helping people high”—who benefits?

This isn’t to say that empowerment isn’t a noble goal. We cannot scorn the hope of giving the marginalized a space to speak, to exist freely, but spending an hour a week in a jail doesn’t give us claim to say we “get it.” Writing and publishing about our work with these writers is a tremendous privilege—it is a demonstration of power. And it all too often leaves out the voices of those we tried to include in the first place.

Frequently revisiting the “why am I here?” question is necessary in volunteer contexts, and the answer can change. I entered Speakout! with the intention to help others, to give them a space to write and create. Now I recognize the complexities in using language that implies I am “giving” something. My work at CSU challenges me to question stereotypes about incarcerated individuals, and to reject the low-bar that the public has set for volunteers.

We may accept the nuances and ambiguities with volunteer work while still finding merit in engaging in these workshops. We can want to help while recognizing the privilege in doing so. We can realize that there are multiple benefitters from this work, and that we, in fact, have been receiving wisdom from those we wanted to help all along.

Kira WFP (3)Kira Marshall-McKelvey is a second year Masters student in Rhetoric and Composition at Colorado State University. She teaches college composition and writes in the areas of digital feminism, Native American rhetoric, and prison literacy. She works with incarcerated writers as a member of CSU’s Speakout! program, and serves as social media intern for Writing for Peace. When she is not working or studying, she enjoys going on hikes, doing yoga, and hanging out with her two delightful cats.

Copyright © 2018 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

Swoop, Bash, and Submit!

Kurt Vonnegut

“Swoopers write a story quickly, higgledy-piggledy, crinkum-crankum, any which way. Then they go over it again painstakingly, fixing everything that is just plain awful or doesn’t work. Bashers go one sentence at a time, getting it exactly right before they go on to the next one. When they’re done they’re done.”
~ Kurt Vonnegut

The truth is, there are as many different writing processes as there are writers. Where do you find your inspiration? Is it in individual acts of courage, like we’re seeing in the young people standing up to the status quo, determined to change a power structure dominated by corporations and their lobbyists? Is your pen fired up by  injustices, like children torn from their parents by an immigration policy that is applied without compassion, especially toward people of color? We’d love to hear about your inspirations and writing processes!

In the meantime, whether you’re a swooper or a basher, the ultimate goal is to get your writing out there where it can make a difference. Today, March 15th, is the final day to submit work for our annual literary journal. If you haven’t already sent us your work, you’ll find the DoveTales guidelines and submit button here.

If you’re planning on entering our contest, you have a couple more weeks. The deadline is April 1st. For ages 13-19, it’s a fun and free challenge that could lead to publication, awards, and other opportunities. You can learn more about the 2018 Young Writers Contest here.

Wishing you all much success in your writing for peace,

Carmel Mawle
President and Founder

 

 

Copyright © 2018 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

 

Young Writers Contest Announcement

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Young Writers Contest Announcement

Now in its sixth year, our annual Writing for Peace Young Writers Contest has had entries from 26 countries and every continent except Antarctica! We’ve extended the deadline to receive essays, poems, and stories from young writers ages 13-19 to April 1st, 2018. Find the full guidelines online here.

We’re excited to announce that this year our prestigious panel of judges are all members of our panel of advisers. Each of them has created a body of work that promotes peace and empathy, demonstrating outstanding creative writing, wisdom, and an innate understanding of the world of human interactions and connectivity. We’re grateful for their service, their time, and their willingness to judge our contest.

Meet Our 2018 Judges:

Patricia Jabbeh Wesley, Writing for Peace AdviserPatricia Jabbeh Wesley, Poetry

Patricia Jabbeh Wesley is an Associate Professor of English and Creative Writing at Penn State University, Altoona. Wesley’s most recent book of poems, “When the Wanderers Come Home,” was written during a four-month stay in her homeland of Liberia in 2013. In his review of the book in World Literature Today, Matthew Shenoda wrote, “Wesley is a poet working to find language that can help show the fractures and fissures of a postwar nation and the personal realities of displacement and return.”

Wesley is the author of four previous collections of poetry and a children’s book. Her poetry has been featured in American Life in Poetry, and her awards include the 2016 WISE Women Award in Arts and Letters, the 2011 President Award from the Blair County NAACP, the 2010 Liberian Award, and a World Bank Fellowship.

 

Adriana Paramo, Writing for Peace AdviserAdriana Paramo, Nonfiction

Adriana is a Colombian writer, born in cold Bogotá but raised in Medellín, The City of Eternal Spring. She received her bachelors of science in Petroleum Engineering and worked as a geophysicist for a multinational oil company for ten years before she left Colombia to make radical changes in her life.  She moved to Alaska where a few years later, she graduated as a Cultural Anthropologist with an emphasis in dance ethnography. In 1996, she moved to Kuwait where she engaged in social activism, advocacy of immigrant women’s rights and designed a tool to assess the quality of life of Indian servants living in Kuwaiti work camps. The findings of this research eventually evolved into “You’re not my Sister,” a CNF work. In 2000, Adriana returned to the USA to teach Humanities and Anthropology to undergraduate students at the local college. She continued her women rights advocacy and did extensive work with the immigrant farming community working in the Florida fields. This research resulted in the production of the manuscript, Looking for Esperanza,” winner of the 2011 Social Justice and Equality Award in Creative Nonfiction, released in 2012 by Benu Press. Her memoir, “My Mother’s Funeral,” set in Colombia, published by CavanKerry Press, was nominated for the Latino Books into Movies Award in 2014. 

Adriana is also on the advisory panel of Writing for Peace, an active member of the travel writing workshop of VONA–Voices of Our Nations Arts Foundation–a community of writers of color, and provides one-on-one mentoring to inmates for a Prison Writing Program.

djelloul-marbrook leaningDjelloul Marbrook, Fiction

Djelloul Marbrook is the acclaimed author of five books of fiction, five books of poetry, and five more books are currently forthcoming from Leaky Boot Press, United Kingdom.

Marbrook won the 2008 Literal Latté fiction prize for “Artists Hill,” an excerpt from Crowds of One, Book 2 in the Guest Boy trilogy. New Millennium Writings has selected four of his stories and one poem in the last 10 years. His work has been published by American Poetry Review, Barrow Street, Coal Hill Review, Omniverse, Galatea Resurrects, Taos Poetry Journal, Onager Editions, Orbis (UK), From the Fishouse, Oberon, The Same, Reed, Fledgling Rag, Pine Hills Review, Le Zaporogue (Denmark), Poets Against the War, Poemeleon, Van Gogh’s Ear Anthology (France), Atticus Review, Onager Editions, Knot Magazine, Deep Water Literary Journal, Red Sky (the Sable Books anthology on violence against women) and Daylight Burglary, among others.

Marbrook maintains a lively presence on Twitter and Facebook. A U.S. Navy veteran and retired newspaper editor, he lives in the mid-Hudson Valley with his wife Marilyn. His newspaper career included the Providence (RI) Journal, the Elmira (NY) Star-Gazette, the Baltimore Sun, the Winston-Salem Journal, the Washington Star, and Media News dailies in northeast Ohio and northern New Jersey. He is the editor-in-chief of Arabesques, a trilingual online and print literary quarterly.

Copyright © 2018 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

President’s Corner: January Hello and Update, By Carmel Mawle

President’s Corner:

Carmel Mawle is the founder of Writing for Peace and serves as President of the Board of Directors.

Carmel Mawle
Founder and President

Hello, friends! I’m hoping that this first post of 2018 finds you all well and on your way to a fruitful new year. We look forward to supporting you in your writing and activism.

First, some news:

President Andrea W. Doray has stepped down for personal reasons, but will continue to serve on our Board of Directors as Past President. We’re grateful for her leadership and vision and look forward to future blog posts from her. The good news is we have an amazing Board of Directors. Our longtime adviser Mary Carroll-Hackett has agreed to serve as Vice President, and I’m honored to once again serve as president of the board and Editor-in-Chief of DoveTales.

Since our Refugees and the Displaced edition of DoveTales was released last year, we have seen rising and unprecedented cruelty in United States immigration policies. Families are torn apart. Patients are dragged from their beds. Immigrants fear calling the police when they are the victims of violent crimes because the call could trigger their own deportation. And asylum seekers, with little chance of a fair review, are being sent back to the countries they fled even though their lives are in danger.

One thing we can and must do is help them get their stories out. You will likely see them in our blog, our journal, our Peace Correspondent, and on our Facebook page. We will also be working to make our annual Youth Summit accessible to those who might benefit from translation. If you’re interested in helping with this project, please send your contact information, resume, and a short introductory paragraph to editor@writingforpeace.org.

While you’ll see lots of new initiatives this year, you can count on our annual publication, DoveTales, an International Journal of the Arts, our Young Writers Contest, and our periodical, The Peace Correspondent.

The theme for our next journal is “Empathy in Art: Embracing the Other.” It promises to be a powerful look at how we connect with each other and move toward compassion. The deadline has been extended to March 15th, and the book will be released on July 1st. We plan to celebrate with launches and readings all over the globe and hope you can join us for one! Check our guidelines for details.

Our Young Writers Contest is up and entries are trickling in from all over the world. The deadline has been extended to April 1st, 2018. As always, there is no fee for participation. For the complete guidelines check our website.

And continue to look forward to our beautifully evolving periodical, The Peace Correspondent. I’ve heard from so many friends who, like myself, experience moments of despair when reading the news these days. The constant negative torrents of media can be overwhelming, but remember that you are not alone. Keep in touch, and spread the word. We’re in this together. Thanks for all you do.

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Copyright © 2018 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.