Tag Archives: Andrea W. Doray

Introducing Our New President, Andrea W. Doray

Carmel Mawle is the founder of Writing for Peace and serves as President of the Board of Directors.

Carmel Mawle, Founder

By Carmel Mawle, Founder and Past President

One afternoon, in April of 2012, a group of writers gathered around a table in front of a Denver coffee shop. Herb gardens bloomed and spilled from pots as we brainstormed with a vibrant coffee-infused energy. We were all members of the Lighthouse Writers Workshop, all of us deeply moved and inspired by the Occupy Wall Street protests that had survived it’s first brutal winter. As sunlight filtered through new leaves, we imagined a future for Writing for Peace, a simple idea that had begun the autumn before with a young writers contest that sought to develop empathy. On this magical afternoon, our annual journal and it’s title,  DoveTales, was first conceived along with a million other brilliant ideas. Andrea W. Doray was at the table that afternoon and, as we reminisced the other day, she said she could have leapt over the table in her enthusiasm to be a part of Writing for Peace.

We’re now putting together our fifth DoveTales, and how far we’ve come in these short five years! Andrea W. Doray, an award-winning journalist and poet, has been an integral part of  Writing for Peace from the beginning. I am thrilled now to announce that she will be stepping in as President of the Board of Directors. In addition to her mighty pen, Andrea brings with her a wealth of experience in publishing, public relations, and marketing that promises to propel the organization forward during a time when empathy, compassion, and writing for peace is more important than ever. Watch for her inspiring monthly President’s Corner in our blog, the first of which appears below!

Congratulations, Andrea, and thank you for your commitment and service on behalf of a more peaceful world!

President’s Corner:

We Write … That’s Our Superpower

by Andrea W. Doray

 

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Andrea W. Doray, President

For my recent birthday, a friend who knows me well presented me with a coffee mug that says: “I write … what’s your superpower?” She knows I believe, as most of us do, that our words make a difference. And that is, after all, the reason I write.

Of course, as may also be true for you, I write because I have to, because it’s as essential to me as breathing. There’s nothing unique in this sentiment. All the writers I know feel this way to one degree or another. Just thinking on paper through the marvelous and mysterious world of words, through the various lexicons of language, satisfies something crucial in us.

I also write because I feel that I personally have to do something about the world and the way I view it. And when I despair – as I often do – about refugee camps and the ravages of war, about kidnappings, torture, and rape as a weapon of war, about the devastation that war inflicts and then leaves in its wake, I want to be of some use, to put my hands to work. I yearn to offer what little expertise I have as an aid worker to make things right.

In short, I want to be a superhero.

But I have wise friends who remind me that I already have a superpower. When I need to put these hands to work, I grab my pen. I think on paper. Like you, I provide information and education, I create awareness, I ask for action, and most of all I try to spark a measure of considered thought from decent people around the globe.

Through Writing for Peace, we model for young people the ways to make a difference with their words through cultural understanding and acceptance. We model for governments the ways a movement can start and evolve to bring about awareness of and support for issues. We model for the world the ways peaceful activism works to bring about change.

We are so powerful.

I look forward to our many initiatives, including our journal, DoveTales, an International Journal of the Arts, which has been lovingly nurtured and edited by our past president and founder Carmel Mawle for five issues. Have you see the Peace Correspondent, our just-launched news magazine, spearheaded by board member Elissa Tivona?

Writing for Peace Advisor Mary Carroll-Hackett led a stellar Youth Summit in 2016, which brought students from around the globe together for conversation and problem solving. Watch for news about the 2017 Youth Summit later this year.

I am so grateful for this opportunity to serve as president of Writing for Peace – an organization that, since its founding five years ago, has allowed me to pursue my passion, my desire, my absolute need to bring peace to the forefront of the world’s conversations.

If what we write prompts someone else to think about something differently, to support a position, to articulate their own thoughts, or to take peaceful action that advances worldwide – and local – understanding of human rights and social justice, we have made the difference we set out to make.

We write … that’s our superpower. Thank you for joining me on this journey.

 

Copyright © 2017 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

 

Why I can’t unsee what I’ve read about 9/11, by Andrea W. Doray

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Why I can’t unsee what I’ve read about 9/11

by

Andrea W. Doray

 

I haven’t watched the videos of the recent slayings of American journalists. I read the news accounts and the still photos were horrific enough for me, and I knew that I could never unsee it.

But in the theater of my mind, I did see it; in fact, I see it over and over. I see it because I’ve read accounts in the news about what happened, just as I did about the mass shootings in Aurora, CO, and Sandy Hook, CT, the innocent civilian casualties in armed conflicts around the world, and the transports and death camps of the Holocaust. I wasn’t a physical witness to any of these, and yet I can see, I can see, I can see these wicked events taking place.

Such is the power of words.

In September especially, but often throughout the year, my mind returns again and again to the images of the Twin Towers. Like most of us, I watched first in disbelief, then in growing horror, anger, and helplessness. Because of the immediacy, even 13 years ago, of real-time news reporting, I watched September 11, 2001, unfold as I was clustered around a television with dozens of coworkers. The planes, the fires, the collapsing buildings…all seared into our shocked and grieving collective consciousness.

I don’t remember if I watched this next part actually taking place, but I’ve seen the photographs of people leaping from the flaming buildings, caught by the still frames of a camera. And as much as these images haunt me, it’s what I have read that frequents my memory and deepens my sorrow on September 11.

I’m referring to a critically acclaimed poem by Brian Doyle, entitled “Leap.” Doyle’s opening line, “A couple leaped from the south tower, hand in hand,” sets the scene. If you search the Web for this topic, as I did for this column, you’ll find that some people think the images of a man and a woman holding hands as they fell are a hoax, claiming the pictures are photoshopped. But Doyle relies on eyewitness accounts from people who did the seeing – not just of this couple but also of others, very real people forced to make those harrowing desperate choices.

Doyle gives us descriptions from horrified spectators, descriptions made even more chilling in their spare language: “people ‘leaping as they flew out.’ ” And “ ‘falling over themselves’ … ‘too many people falling.’ ” Doyle also relates the events on the streets below, where pedestrians and a firefighter were killed “by people falling from the sky.”

Doyle ends the poem by speculating about the moments leading up to the hand-in-hand plunge. To paraphrase: did they know each other…friends, colleagues? Or were they strangers “thrown together at the window at the lip of hell,” strangers who “held on tight, and leaped….”

Through these unblinking words, I make more of a human connection with the victims than I ever could by watching videos or viewing photos. And it’s because I have read “Leap” that I can’t unsee their desperation, the agony in their final acts. But perhaps that’s what needs to happen, so that these victims, too, will never be forgotten, to keep this tragedy in the theaters of our minds.

Such is the power of words.

 

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About Andrea W. Doray

Andrea Doray, Writing for Peace Board Member

Andrea W. Doray is a member of the Writing for Peace board of directors, and a writer who, not surprisingly, sees things in words. You can find “Leap” at PBS.org, and can hear Brian Doyle read his work on YouTube. Contact Andrea at a.doray@andreadoray.com if you would like the links.

A version of this article appeared in Colorado Community Media newspapers and is reprinted here with permission.

 

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Writing for Peace News

Climate Alarm Is Ringing – And Until Now the United Nations Has Failed To Act – See more at: http://www.occupy.com/article/climate-alarm-ringing-%E2%80%93-and-until-now-united-nations-has-failed-act#sthash.GrDFZqEW.dpuf
Climate Alarm Is Ringing – And Until Now the United Nations Has Failed To Act – See more at: http://www.occupy.com/article/climate-alarm-ringing-%E2%80%93-and-until-now-united-nations-has-failed-act#sthash.GrDFZqEW.dpuf

What Will It Take To Create Climate Justice?

by Writing for Peace Adviser Margaret Flowers, and Kevin Zeese

Dr. Margaret Flowers, Writing for Peace AdviserAll of the elements required to create climate justice seem to be in place. Activists are well organized, polls indicate public support, and overwhelming consensus among the scientific community, so why aren’t governments taking appropriate action to address climate change? Read the article here.

 DoveTales Call for Submissions

DoveTales, a publication of Writing for PeaceWriting for Peace is now accepting submissions for our 2015 “Nature” edition of DoveTales, An International Journal of the Arts. Read our guidelines and submit here.

Young Writers Contest Now Open!

2015 Young Writers Contest JudgesOur Young Writers Contest is now open! To date, Writing for Peace has received entries from young writers with a passion for peace from 24 countries. Go to www.writingforpeace.org to meet our previous winners and learn about our wonderful panel of judges: Antonya Nelson, fiction; Stephen Kuusisto, poetry; and Steve Almond, nonfiction. Read the full guidelines here.

he recent report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is the most worrisome so far. Paired with data from the 2014 National Climate Assessment, there is no question that the climate crisis is here and is accelerating at a faster pace than predicted. Its effects are widespread and dangerous, yet real solutions are being suppressed. – See more at: http://www.occupy.com/article/climate-alarm-ringing-%E2%80%93-and-until-now-united-nations-has-failed-act#sthash.GrDFZqEW.dpuf
Climate Alarm Is Ringing – And Until Now the United Nations Has Failed To Act

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The recent report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is the most worrisome so far. Paired with data from the 2014 National Climate Assessment, there is no question that the climate crisis is here and is accelerating at a faster pace than predicted. Its effects are widespread and dangerous, yet real solutions are being suppressed.

– See more at: http://www.occupy.com/article/climate-alarm-ringing-%E2%80%93-and-until-now-united-nations-has-failed-act#sthash.GrDFZqEW.dpuf

Support Writing for Peace By Purchasing Our Latest Edition Of DoveTales

The recent report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is the most worrisome so far. Paired with data from the 2014 National Climate Assessment, there is no question that the climate crisis is here and is accelerating at a faster pace than predicted. Its effects are widespread and dangerous, yet real solutions are being suppressed. – See more at: http://www.occupy.com/article/climate-alarm-ringing-%E2%80%93-and-until-now-united-nations-has-failed-act#sthash.GrDFZqEW.dpuf

2014 DoveTales, "Contrast" Edition2014 DoveTales, “Contrast” edition, is now available for purchase. The 2014 issue is themed “contrast” and includes the beautiful black and white photography of Writing for Peace Artist-in-Residence Paula Dawn Lietz, as well as the 2013 Young Writers Contest winners, and the following contributors:

Jordi Alonso, Cassandra Arnold, Maggie Bàra, Henry Braun, Lorraine Caputo, William Cass, Lorraine Currelley, Colin Dodds, John Garmon, Diane Giardi, Mark Goad, Veronica Golos, Sam Hamill, Dawnell Harrison, D. Iasevoli, Ed.D, Allan M. Jalon, Shelley Kahn, Richard Krawiec, Paula Dawn Lietz, Cory Lockhart, Shannon K. Lockhart, Veronica Marshall, Sandra McGarry, Iwona Partyka, Sy Roth, Andrew Sacks, Carol Smallwood, Julia Stein, Samantha Peters Terrell, Bänoo Zan

Copyright © 2014 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

What happens when we lose our innocence? by Andrea W. Doray

Andrea Doray, Writing for Peace Board MemberWhat Happens When We Lose Our Innocence?

by Andrea W. Doray

 

Things get lost.

One of my treasured black pearl earrings, a gift from the South Pacific island of Moorea. My favorite book of poetry, inscribed by my Auntie Mable more than 30 years ago. And the perfect-sized carry-on computer rolly bag. Seriously, where could that be?

In the end, though, all of this is just stuff. I can replace almost anything if I want to spend the time and the money. Or I can just enjoy the memories, which are often nearly as sweet.

Yet we have all experienced losses that seem too hard to bear—the loss of loved ones, the loss of our livelihoods, the loss of our dreams…and our recent collective loss, at Sandy Hook in Connecticut, USA.

Where do these losses go? Where do they reside until we are ready to face the fact that they are really gone?

And what happens when we lose our innocence?

Most of us associate innocence with children, with a lack of worldliness—a condition we start to lose as soon as we begin to acquire wisdom.

But innocence is a pearl we can carry with us throughout our lives, a way of viewing each other without prejudice, of looking for the potential for good in people and situations. And, perhaps most importantly, a way of looking at the world without fear.

Yet, what happens when this innocence is torn from us…at any age?

Where does our innocence go when families and friends are gunned down in a theater, when a 10-year-old girl’s monstrous rape and murder rip a community apart, when kindergarten teachers lose their own lives trying to shield children who are also ultimately killed?

Where is our innocence now?

If we are very lucky, some remnant of innocence is within us still, inextricably linked with our ability to on, with our willingness—however reluctant—to participate again in society, with our desire to reconnect with the very fabrics of our lives.

If we are very, very lucky, we find enough left of our own innocence to help others regain theirs, especially our children.

And, although our innocence—like our pearl earrings and our books of poetry—may be replaced, it is often not without great pain and great expense.

But we must keep looking. We must find, again, a way of living in the world that allows us some hope, some joy, some peace.

Just as we try to remember to put our earrings in a box and our books on the shelf, we must remember to take care of our own innocence, that we may find it again when we need it most.

 “Our hearts are broken. Our spirits are strong.”

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Andrea W. Doray is a writer who believes that peace—in the world and in the heart—requires both wisdom and innocence. Learn more about Andrea here. Contact her at a.doray@andreadoray.com.

 

Writing for Peace News

Writing for Peace Young Writers' Contest2013 Young Writers Contest

The Writing for Peace Young Writers Contest is in full swing, with entries coming in from all over the globe.  The contest is open to writers of poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction, for ages 13 to 19. Contest deadline is March 1st, 2013. Spread the word to young writers everywhere! You’ll find contest guidelines here.

DoveTales, a publication of Writing for PeaceDoveTales Journal

The first issue of DoveTales, an International Journal of Writing, Art, and Photography, is beginning to take shape, and it is beautiful. It will feature poets, writers, artists and photographers from all over the world with thought-provoking takes on our theme, “Occupied.” We are also looking forward to seeing the winners of our 2012 Young Writers Contest in print! Mark your calendars for our inaugural release date: Friday, February 1st, 2013.  And thank you for your support!

 

Copyright © 2013 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.