Tag Archives: DoveTales

A Special Peace Correspondent: The Coming Student Edition, by Elissa Tivona

elissa-tivona-3With the snow recently melted, the first crocuses that break through packed patches of dirt seem, in a word, impossible. I am awed that nature understands how hungry the human heart is for the green promise of growing things. Those tender, fierce flowers awaken a yearning I barely notice at other times of the year.

Likewise in sleepy winter months when the Peace Journalism course gets underway, the intensity and resolve that drove me to create a new curriculum lie dormant. I start out with reasonable intentions: to explore news media’s complicity in shaping violent environments and to teach students methods for turning that woeful trend around.  I craft assignments pointing students toward enlightened, alternative approaches for reporting news, that ask young reporters to elevate social solutions rather than feature stories of persistent strife. But, by the concluding weeks of the semester, I am ready to jump out of my skin. I’ve been staring into too many faces dulled by too many years of schooling and too little inspiration. I have days when I leave campus dispirited and think, “Why bother? This is just not working.”

Still, I keep pushing and prodding up until the day they submit a final assignment. Their challenge is to tell an extended, multi-dimensional, nuanced story; to avoid demonizing one stakeholder over another; and to reach for promising solutions—case studies, prototypes, models, social experiments, moments of insight— real news stories of real people who expend energy in efforts to heal and solve some of the greatest challenges of our day.

And, behold, the crocuses start to emerge.

I offer results of this pedagogical experiment: student stories that point to possibility for new media. These are the green and growing insights of a new generation of young writers.  You will notice a range of voices: some with sustained and focused messages, others that falter.  But each effort loosens the soil, making a little more room for media that nourish hope and dignity rather than perpetuate violent conflict and infamy.

Look ahead to the June edition of The Peace Correspondent, highlighting the work of Colorado State University students. These novice writers feature articles in four categories: Take Another Look, longstanding conflict and new perspectives; Heart to Heart, conversations on challenging topics; On Our Minds, where news media and mental health intersect; and The Peace Correspondent’s regular column Spotlight on Solutions.  Go in peace, friends, spring is here.

Elissa J. Tivona is a renegade journalist who believes media can be part of the solution to achieving sustained peace. She helped establish the Peace and Reconciliation minor at Colorado State University: and she developed the innovative curriculum for the program’s core course, Education for Global Peace, as well as curriculum for a new Journalism offering at CSU, Journalism, War and Peace. Along with her work as an educator, Tivona writes for both academic and popular publications. She is an active volunteer, including: serving on the Board of Writing For Peace; vice-president of the United Nations Association, Northern Colorado Chapter; consultant to Tiyospaye Winyan Maka, an NGO building sustainable homesteads and right livelihoods in collaboration with the Lakota people; and longstanding convener of multi-faith peace advocates in Northern Colorado.

Small Writing for Peace logoWriting for Peace News

Coming Soon! Our 2017 DoveTales, “Refugees and the Displaced”

2017 Front CoverThe fifth edition of our annual literary journal, DoveTales, An International Journal of the Arts, will be released on May 1st. Our “Refugees and the Displaced” themed DoveTales is a timely affront to a status quo comfortable with the suffering of others. With contributors from every continent on the planet except Antarctica (we’re working on that), this is a book that is meant to challenge assumptions and explore issues of peace, social justice, and our responsibility to our fellow man. Cover art is by Canadian artist, Allen Forrest. Watch for more information as it becomes available in the next few days on our website, and mark May 1st on your calendar!

 

Young Writers Contest Results

Results are coming on our 2017 Young Writers contest. Announcements will be made on May 1st here in our blog. Stay tuned for the excitement!

Copyright © 2017 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

 

DoveTales “Nature” Release, and 2015 Contest Winners

2015 post Header2015 Book Release

Our 2015 DoveTales, an International Journal of the Arts, “Nature” Edition is now available for purchase! The “Nature” edition is our largest undertaking to date, with 82 wonderful contributors, plus our nine Young Writers Contest Winners from 2014. The book is 398 glorious pages. Special thanks goes to Colgate University Research Council for their generous sponsorship.

DoveTales "Nature" Cover

Contributors include:

Jordi Alonso, Pilar Rodríguez Aranda, Jasmine V. Bailey, Pratima Annapurna Balabhadrapathruni, Danny P. Barbare , Zeina Hashem Beck , Sarina Bosco, Elena Botts, Bredt Bredthauer, Lauren Camp, Hélène Cardona, Ariella Carmell, Mary Carroll-Hackett, William Cass, Yuan Changming, Jennifer Clark, Edward D. Currelley, Lorraine Currelley, Darlene P. Campos, Maija Rhee Devine (이매자), Virginia Bach Folger, Stuart Friebert, Eve Gaal, Kelle Grace Gaddis, Frederick Glaysher, Sharon Goodier, Ben Gunsberg, Sam Hamill, William Haywood Henderson, Jane Hertenstein, Don Hogle, Qumyka Rasheeda Howell, Elizabeth Hoyle, A.J. Huffman, Lauren Kessler, Ross Knapp, Page Lambert, Charles Leggett, Vicki Lindner, Cory Lockhart, Shannon K. Lockhart, John C. Mannone, Mark Mansfield, Jeremy Nathan Marks, Kevin Patrick McCarthy, Sandra McGarry, Dean K. Miller, Mark J. Mitchell, Roseville Nidea, Stephanie Noble, Barry W. North, Cheryl Pearson, Adrienne Pine, Jeannine Pitas, Jessica Placinto, David S. Pointer, Laura Pritchett, Claudia Putnam, Lisa Rizzo, Nicholas Alexander Roos, Sy Roth, Elizabeth Schultz, Tshombe Sekou, Alan Semrow, Annette Marie Smith, Patty Somlo, Howard F. Stein, Fred Tarr, Samantha Terrell, Jari Thymian, Debra Lynn Turner, Smriti Verma, Wang Ping, Jing M. Wang, Mercedes Webb-Pullman, Laura Grace Weldon

Art and Photography by

Chrystal Berche, Sylvia Freeman, Kevin Houchin, Paula Dawn Lietz, Carl Scharwath, Christopher Woods

Plus 2014 Young Writers Contest Winners:

Fiction: Angela Yoon, 1st; Jiace Cai, 2nd; Cassidy Cole, 3rd
Nonfiction: Ben Gershenfeld, 1st; Evan Kielmeyer, 2nd; Yen Nguyen, 3rd
Poetry: Dashiell Yeatts-Lonske, 1st; Matthew Rice, 2nd; John Vernaglia, 3rd

Editor: Carmel Mawle
Associate Editors: Craig Mawle, Phillip M. Richards, Willean Denton Hornbeck, Le Hornbeck, Michelle Catherine
Contributing Editor: Andrea W. Doray

Small Writing for Peace logo2015 Young Writers Contest Winners

2015 Young Writers Contest Judges2015 Contest Judges

We would like to acknowledge all of the young writers who took the time to research a new culture and write a story, essay, or poem for the Writing for Peace Young Writers Contest. Completing this challenge is no small achievement, and we salute your commitment to expanding your knowledge base and developing your craft. We would also like to thank the teachers and mentors who encouraged their students to take our challenge, and then inspired and guided them to prepare their best work. We were tremendously impressed with the quality of all the entries this year.

In Fiction

First Place: “Haozhen” by Tiffany Wang
Denton, Texas, USA

Second Place: “Between Islands” by Janghwan Bae
Bundang-gu, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea

Third Place: “Ronin: the Fallen Samurai” by Moon Hyung Lee
Seoul, South Korea

In Nonfiction

First Place: “A Reason for Hope” by Min Seong Kim
Fairfax, Virginia, USA

Second Place: “Jews and the Black Death” by Hannah Rosenthal
Hauppauge, New York, USA

Third Place: “The Problems of Stressful Educational System in Singapore” by Vincent Yohanes, Indonesia

In Poetry

First Place: “The Third Daughter” by Allie Spensley
Avon Lake, Ohio, USA

Second Place: “A Red Eulogy” by Lisa Zou
Chandler, Arizona, USA

Third Place: “Terrorism, an unknown entity” by Moiz Khan
Roanoke, VA, USA, Pakistani exchange student

2015 winning entries will be published in our 2016 DoveTales. Participation Certificates and Awards will be sent out next week. Be sure to watch our blog and Facebook page to learn more about these talented young writers, and what our judges had to say about their work. We would like to thank our prestigious panel of judges: Antonya Nelson, fiction; Steve Almond, Nonfiction; Stephen Kuusisto, poetry.

Congratulations to all our contest winners!

Copyright © 2015 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

Writing for Peace News, May 2012

DoveTales Submission Guidelines Released

Our June 1st posting begins an exciting new phase for Writing for Peace. First, we are announcing the release of the DoveTales Submission Guidelines.  DoveTales will feature our young writers’ winning stories, along with the stories, poems, essays, interviews, art and photography of established contributors. Our first issue will be published on January 1st, 2013, and will center on the theme “Occupied” – in its myriad of meanings.

Free Teen Summer Writing Workshops

Writing for Peace Wolf Writing WorkshopWe’ve also put together a terrific series of Free Teen Summer Writing Workshops, offered in libraries across Colorado’s Front Range. Young writers will focus on subtleties of the craft, while considering voice and point-of-view through the perspective of wild animals in urban environments, wolves, and other pack animals. Participants will also have the opportunity to hear stories of refugees of the human sort, and contemplate the many ways that the seeds of a story can take root and grow. Check our site periodically to catch new offerings as they appear.

Young Writers Rocky Mountain Creative Writing Day Camp

The summer workshop series will culminate in the unforgettable Young Writers Rocky Mountain Creative Writing Day Camp onWriting for Peace cowboys September 8th from 9am – 8pm at Sylvan Dale Guest Ranch, featuring keynote speakers John Gritts, Page Lambert, and William Haywood Henderson. The cost for this full day writing workshop is $65. There is an additional charge of $50 for the Horseback Writing Class (Poetry in the Saddle). Young writers, ages 13 – 19, delve into both the cowboy and Indian way of life, explore the written and oral traditions of these Western Americans, and the animals that were vital to both cultures. We’ll experience the late summer beauty of this working ranch nestled against the Rocky Mountains, walk a mile in another’s moccassins…and put that experience into words.

Fiction, nonfiction, or poetry…writers will explore aspects of point of view and voice, and outline future writing projects. After dinner, writers will be invited to share their work around the campfire. Space is limited, so please register early!

Writing for Peace Rocky Mountain Creative Writing Day Camp at Sylvan Dale Guest Ranch

Writing for Peace Rocky Mountain Creative Writing Day Camp at Sylvan Dale Guest Ranch

 

Workshop includes…

*Continental breakfast, ranch lunch, and workshop supplies

*Traditional horse painting and riding demonstration

*Poetry in the saddle (horseback writing, additional $50)

*Tractor-drawn hayride tour and ranch talk

*Cowboy poetry reading (ever read your work to a cow?)

*We’ll end our day camp with a campfire reading, pizza and roasted marshmallows!

Download the brochure and registration form here.  Writing for Peace Summer Camp Brochure

 

Contributing Advisor, Brian Wrixon

And perhaps the best news of all…

If you’ve had the opportunity to explore the Writing for Peace website, you’ve most likely come across our impressive list of Advisors. From the beginning, we’ve been blessed with advisors who were available to answer questions and guide us as we navigated through unfamiliar territory. Our growing Advisory Panel includes award-winning poets, novelists, memoirists and essayists. They are activists and entrepreneurs of immense personal integrity and determination, some who may not even consider themselves writers in the traditional sense, but their writings have played a vital role in promoting awareness and bridging the cultural divides that separate us. In addition to their important work and behind-the-scenes support for Writing for Peace, they have graciously agreed to contribute their insights and inspiration through our blog.

We are pleased to introduce our very first Contributing Advisor, Brian Wrixon. For his full biography and a links to his publications, please check out his Advisor Page.

 

Brian Wrixon, Writing for Peace AdvisorCommentary by Brian Wrixon – poet, writer, publisher, and member of Writing for Peace’s Advisory Panel

I know that Writing for Peace will play an important role in building harmony in the world. Our process is a logical one and a simple one, two, three approach  –  cultivate empathy in order to develop a foundation of compassion, and on this foundation, build peace. Using education as the driver for the process is not something new, but focusing on creative writing and gearing that focus towards our youth is what makes Writing for Peace unique. That uniqueness is what prompted me to agree when I was asked to serve on the organization’s Advisory Panel.

One of the points made on the website is that, “Writing can be a solitary occupation, but there is much to be gained by sharing your work and process with other writers.” I have experienced this firsthand in the last few months. Through Facebook, I am connected with an incredible number of authors from all over the world. I asked them to share their works with me for the purpose of publishing a series of anthologies on different themes. The response was amazing!

Our first book will be of particular interest to the members and supporters of Writing for Peace. It is called “The Poetry of War & Peace”, and features the writings of 80 poets from 20 countries. Many of these authors are young people still in school and before this book, were unpublished. What struck me most was the intensity with which they wrote. On the back cover of the book you can find the following: “Theirs is a powerful message. Their feelings run deep and their words are strong, sometimes not for the faint of heart. But then again, war and peace are not for the faint of heart either. WARNING: CONTAINS CONTENT THAT MAY CAUSE AN OUTBREAK OF PEACE!” It is no small wonder that I named our Facebook support group of 450+ writers, Poets with Voices Strong.

When I looked at Writing for Peace’s mission, the approach that they intended to take, and the value proposition that they were offering to young writers, I knew that the experience that I had with my international writers group was something that could be replicated. I look forward to working with this group and seeing that excitement grow in other young people through creative writing.

I seem to spend a lot of time working on my publishing projects, but I am first and foremost a poet. At this writing, we have published two major anthologies so far and two more are about to be released in the next month, but I still try to find time to write. I have written a lot of poetry about war, some 50 poems to be exact. They were not written to glorify war, but to foster peace. In that respect, I find myself  living in synch with the mission statement of Writing for Peace. Please allow me to share with you one of my personal favourites from my collection of war poems.

In the Morning Mist

Morning mists swirl around marble headstones

Like the spirits of the dead who play among the tombs

The call of a crow breaks the eerie silence

As a frail and bent figure approaches the grave

She places a single rose on the cold and weathered stone

Softly she speaks the words “My Love”

And lingers a moment lost in a silent prayer

As she leaves the sun shines through the mist

And illuminates the words chiseled so long ago

“A Victim of the Great War”

I have always had a great fascination for the “Great War for Civilization”, the “War to end all wars”, WW1. What a hopelessly futile waste of men and material. Thousands were killed on a daily basis in order to secure a plot of ground which would then be abandoned a few days later. Millions of men were moved about like chess pieces by commanders and generals sitting in the comfort of far away headquarters smoking cigars and sipping brandy. We never learn!

When I wrote “In the Morning Mist”, I was unsure who the frail and bent old lady was who was mourning at the grave all those many years later. Perhaps her lover or husband had not returned from the conflict. Perhaps she was a mother who had lost a son. Perhaps she was a retired nurse who still held special feelings for a young soldier who had died in her arms in a field hospital, happy to have her comfort at his death. Then I realized that she was all these women – she is the grieving woman of history personified.

I use my creative writings to express my feelings. I hope that through your involvement with Writing for Peace, you will have the same opportunity to connect with yourself and with your fellow writers.

Brian Wrixon

Burlington, Ontario, Canada

 

Copyright © 2012 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.