Tag Archives: Patricia Jabbeh Wesley

DoveTales Online, Issue 1 – August 2019

Our first issue of DoveTales Online is up!

DoveTales, a publication of Writing for PeaceSince 2013, Writing for Peace has invited writers and artists from all over the globe to explore themes within the context of current events. Their responsespoetry, fiction, nonfiction, art and photographytell us something about the nature of humanity. We learn from each other. We share our joys and grief, empathy and compassion, the wisdom of years and youth, and the dream of a world that is healthy and diverse, with equality and justice for every sentient beingwhether or not they can afford political lobbyists. This philosophy resulted in a collection of beautiful print booksOccupied, Contrast, Nature, Family and Cultural Identity, Refugees and the Displaced, and Empathy in Art: Embracing the Otherthat educate, inspire, and challenge us.

We continue this tradition with our new online journal, celebrating the community we have built together, and supporting each other in our efforts to leave this world a better place for future generations—and being online, we can do it with more color, audio and videos!

In this, our first issue of DoveTales Online, you’ll find our 2019 Young Writers Contest Winners, as well as poetry, prose, and visual art that delves into our Guest Editor, Patricia Jabbeh Wesley’s theme: “One World, One People.” If this theme seems incongruous with our daily news, make a cup of tea, get comfortable, and find out what her thought process was in choosing it. Thank you for joining us in the debut of DoveTales, An International Online Journal of the Arts!

Check out DoveTales Online Now ~

 

Copyright © 2019 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

DoveTales Online, Issue 1, One World, One People

DoveTales, a publication of Writing for PeaceThe first online DoveTales launches on August 1st, 2019, and includes our Young Writers Contest Winners. Our Guest Editor is Writing for Peace Adviser Patricia Jabbeh Wesley, and she has chosen the beautiful theme “One World, One People.”

DoveTales, An International Journal of the Arts is an extension of our mission to promote writing that explores the many aspects of peace.  Our goal is to expose young writers to a diverse collection of thoughtful works by our advisers, established, and emerging writers.

DoveTales includes art and photography, as well as poetry, fiction, and nonfiction, occasionally including interviews with writers and individuals working to promote peace through environmental, human rights, and  social justice activism.

Copyright © 2019 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

Good things are coming!

Good morning, peace writers!

Hoping you’re all feeling energized by the latest news and not despairing. Good things are happening. Light is shining in dark places. Hidden evils are being revealed. Remember, when horrible news surfaces—over 900 children separated from their parents since this disastrous policy was “ended,” mass shootings becoming commonplace, climate change speeding up and scientists silenced, to name a few—it is because writers and activists are refusing to let them fester in the dark. Hard truths gain power when they are kept secrets, so let’s celebrate the knowing and keep on pushing forward. We’re in this together.

We’re working hard here at Writing for Peace. If you’re reading this on the website, you may have already seen some changes there. The site is looking pretty slicknew event calendar, streamlined format, and mobile responsive. It should be much easier to navigate on any device. All this in preparation for the launch of our beautiful new online DoveTales!

Tomorrow is the big day. DoveTales, An International Journal of the Arts is going online! I’m seeing it take shape here, and it’s absolutely gorgeous. Guest editor Patricia Jabbeh Wesley’s theme, “One World, One People,” has resonated with writers and artists across the globe. You’ll find hard truth, hope, love and laughter in its illuminated pages. And you won’t want to miss our young writers’ beautiful winning poems, essays and stories.

So keep the faith and watch for our new DoveTales tomorrow. We’ll be working right up until it launches, so send a good thought our way.

Wishing you peace and strength,

Carmel

Carmel Mawle is founder of the nonprofit literary organization, Writing for Peace, and has served as Editor-in-Chief of DoveTales, An International Journal of the Arts since 2013. A Pushcart Nominee, her short stories, essays and poetry have been published in literary journals and anthologies, including Smokelong Quarterly and Shake the Tree Anthology.

Copyright © 2019 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

Recharge for Upcoming Writing Deadlines

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Hello fellow Writers for Peace,

I hope you are all enjoying the emerging spring, or conversely (for our friends in the southern hemisphere), the autumn colors. Here in the Rocky Mountains, the melting snow is filling the creek beds with icy whitewater and, after months of cold and snow, the slopes and meadows are greening up. When so much of what is reported by the corporate media is gloom and doom, we can still find hope in the changing colors of the seasons. Even in the concrete cities, nature finds its way into the cracks between slabs of pavement. Take a few moments to appreciate the life that is beyond our small scope and busy days; breathe in the earth’s ever-changing colors and recharge the energy that feeds your creativity. Don’t doubt that this troubled world is more beautiful because of what you bring to it.

I want to remind you of two important Writing for Peace deadlines coming up on June 1st:

Young Writers Contest GuidelinesFirst, is our Young Writers Contest for ages 13-19. Over the seven years we have offered this contest, we have had entries from 26 different countries. It’s an unusual challenge to develop the writers’ tool of empathy, to research and educate oneself on a new culture, the history, politics, even religious traditions and pressures of a region, and write from the perspective of a character within that culture. The challenge is to avoid stereotypes and find the universal commonalities that make us all (as our adviser Patricia Jabbeh Wesley says so beautifully), “one people.”

Please encourage the young writers you know to join their peers and accept this challenge. Let’s hear what this new generation of young writers has to say.

DoveTales, a publication of Writing for PeaceAnd secondly, DoveTales, an International Journal of the Arts, is graduating to a new, more accessible, medium. After six extraordinary print journals, DoveTales is going online. While we traditionalists may miss curling up with the printed book, there’s no denying the advantages of an online journal in reaching a greater audience. Our goal has always been to lift up work by our advisers, new, and emerging writers from across the globe who have something important to add to the collective conversation on resistance, creativity, human rights, cherishing each other and the planet we live on.

Patricia Jabbeh Wesley, Writing for Peace AdviserWe are honored that our Adviser Patricia Jabbeh Wesley has agreed to serve as Guest Editor of our first online edition of DoveTales, launching on August 1st, 2019. Her theme for the  edition is “One World, One People.” The reading period for this journal will close on June 1st, 2019.

So, dear writers and readers, let’s take a deep breath, reach out to each other through the written word, and connect with our inner green earth. There is much work to do, but we’re not alone.

Much love, Carmel

~~~

Carmel-Laughing-1Carmel Mawle is the Founder and President of the Board of Directors for Writing for Peace. She writes from the northern Colorado Rocky Mountains where she lives with her husband and Max, a ten-pound border terrier mix who firmly believes he’s a mountain dog.

Copyright © 2019 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

Ebola Crisis in Liberia, By Patricia Jabbeh Wesley

Patricia Jabbeh Wesley, Writing for Peace AdviserAnother Look at the Ebola Crisis in Liberia

By Patricia Jabbeh Wesley

Where there is no vision, the people perish…,” yes, that is in the Bible, folks, in the great Proverbs, particularly, in chapter 29, verse 18, and now, I guess, you’re saying, “Hallelujah, preach it,” but hold on; I’m not trying to preach anything. I’m simply taking you somewhere different than a preacher would take you. Where is this trouble-maker going? You may ask. Yes, I’m going somewhere. Liberia, West Africa, along with two of its neighboring sister countries, Guinea and Sierra Leone, have been grappling with the deadly Ebola virus and in just a few months nearly two thousand of its citizens have died from this deadly virus. Most of the dead, nearly 1,500, have died in Liberia alone. And Liberia, my home country, my lovely homeland of a vibrant and happy people, a people whose laughter is so contagious it steals the visitor’s heart, is dying out one family after another, whole families of dozens, annihilated in simultaneous attacks across the capital city of Monrovia and throughout the country. If we should defeat this virus and win this new war, the effort by the Liberian government, its citizens, and the world at large, has to be a peace effort. For how can the world declare itself a peaceful place when some of its nations are being annihilated by such a deadly virus? Here, I am approaching my discussion from the point of how a government cannot have security or peace when its citizens are dying like sick chickens.

For some reason, I always knew that there was a connection between good medical services in a country, the provision of the most basic needs for a nation’s citizens, and peace. Over the last several years during my research trips to Liberia and during a long five month stay for my 2013 sabbatical, I was troubled that the lack of the most basic needs, including but not limited to adequate medical centers, medical supplies and medicines, a serious educational structure and system, good water supply, electricity and roads connecting all parts of the country to the capital and throughout each section of the country, have hampered the peace process and the rebuilding of Liberia after 14 years of war. I was deeply worried, despite the heavy United Nations presence in the country and the false sense of security the Liberian government has enjoyed for the last decade. Today, Ebola has confirmed my fears. Liberia, with its false sense of stability and peace,  is so troubled by that dangerous threat that Ebola could destroy the nation’s place on the world map and annihilate most of its citizens.

Peace is not the absence of war; peace is the ability of a people to benefit from all of that nation’s wealth and power, and silence is not the evidence of peace because silence itself could be the lack of peace. A nation is at peace when its people are empowered by their leaders and the laws of the land to enable them to function in a civilized world, and where the lowly as well as the powerful enjoy the wealth of their land. But this was not so in Liberia. Now that we are convinced that Liberia has failed its people, we must defeat Ebola and usher in a more abled leadership or at least an abled style of leadership.

You may wonder if, like many Liberian political aspirants, I am advocating for a change of leadership in the midst of this crisis, but I’m not. I do not believe in creating war while another war, the struggle with the Ebola virus, is ongoing. Anyone knows that a change of leadership in Africa is one of the most complicated processes anywhere in the world. African democracy is never independent of outside intervention, and the African sense of leadership change often creates more confusion than peace. I am therefore advocating that every effort should be made to support the Ellen Johnson Sirleaf leadership to overcome the Ebola virus and save our nation. I am advocating that the government works to win the people’s confidence. But that will begin when the current leadership purges itself of those who lack the understanding that leaders are servants, and not lords. If you have visited Liberia in the last decade or even earlier, you will have noticed that most of the leadership believed that they were not servants of the people, but lords. I hope they realize now after not only the civil war, but as a result of the current Ebola crisis, that their belief in themselves as “lords” is only an illusion. In addition to a change in the leadership’s attitude to leading, I recommend that they reeducate themselves to understand who we are as Liberians and as Africans. Maybe by understanding their place in the world, they will value their own people as human beings, and thereby save the nation.

For those calling for a change of leadership, I am sorry. Any call for a change of leadership at this crucial tragic time is from a completely misguided vision of where Liberia should be going. What Liberia needs right now is not a change of leaders just to usher in a similar set of leadership; what we need now are visionary leaders who can work with everyone for our future and to overcome this Ebola tragedy. What we need also is a complete rewashing of the Liberian psyche so we understand the connection betwee­­n someone with vision and the determination to develop our country, to lift our people out of the dirt they’re in, and to rebuild Liberia to genuine stability. We need selfless, capable, caring and visionary leaders, people who see beyond themselves, big brain people, those who are not afraid of educated and wise people, but embrace both the educated and the uneducated alike because it takes all to rebuild a nation. We need people with big, big hearts, not in the Liberian “big heart” colloquial sense, but people who care not just for their own, but for the larger society and the larger world. We need men and women who know that they are indeed Liberians, not some expatriates with the mind to run away when things get bad. We need folks with eyes to see the future and with big hands to get in the dirt to do the work and usher in a new and better future.

We also need a Liberia with a citizenry that is never satisfied with nothing as with this generation of Liberians. We need a Liberia that has high expectations of its leaders, and makes them accountable to them. We need folks who are not satisfied with small peanuts and crumbs from the President’s table, folks, who know that crumbs are not enough, that crumbs are for slaves, and slavery has nothing to do with freedom, peace or democracy. We need Liberians who can learn to love themselves, learn to love their heritage as Liberians, as Africans, not some imported people, but as people with a great culture. We need leaders who can bring back our lost music and our dances and cultural centers that have been traded to investors, those who can bring us back to what we ought to be. We are not foreigners trying to be Africans. We are Africans and, until we can help our people appreciate what they are, it will be difficult to heal the wounds from the civil war and this Ebola crisis. We need a true visionary group of people to see that the future is better than the present or the past, and that we can get there.

So, stop toying with the idea of changing the truck driver until you get a driver that has the ability to drive over the potholes the old driver and his/her old truck has dug us into. We need someone whose eyes are radiant with a vision to lift Liberia, and it is not impossible to find that person and that group of Liberians right among ourselves. It is not impossible, but to find them we, the ordinary voices crying out from afar and near, those of us rejected and those of us included, must come together with the clearest vision ever if we are to fight this deadly virus and rebuild a better Liberia.

About Patricia Jabbeh Wesley, Writing for Peace Adviser

Patricia Jabbeh Wesley, Writing for Peace AdviserPatricia Jabbeh Wesley is a survivor of the Liberian civil war, immigrating to the United States in 1991. She is the author of four books of poetry: Where the Road Turns, (Autumn House Press, 2010), The River is Rising (Autumn House Press, 2007), Becoming Ebony, (SIU Press, 2003) and Before the Palm Could Bloom: Poems of Africa (New Issues Press, 1998). In 2013, she published her first children’s book, In Monrovia, the River Visits the Sea (One Moore Book Publishers, 2013). Her fifth book of poetry, “Biography, When the Wanderers Come Home,” is forthcoming in the spring of 2015.

She has won several awards and grants, including the 2011 President Barack Obama Award for her writings from Blair County NAACP, the 2010 Liberian Award for her poetry, a Penn State University AESEDA Collaborative Grant for her research on Liberian Women’s Trauma stories, a 2002 Crab Orchard Award for her second book of poems, Becoming Ebony, an Irving S. Gilmore Emerging Artist Grant from the Kalamazoo Foundation, a World Bank Fellowship, among others. Patricia has a Ph.D. in Creative Writing and English from Western Michigan University, a Master of Science degree in Eng. Education from Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, and a BA in English from the University of Liberia, Monrovia, Liberia. Learn more about Patricia’s work here.

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 From Writing for Peace Adviser Dr. Margaret Flowers:

Dr. Margaret Flowers, Writing for Peace AdviserNext For Climate Justice, More War, Student Protests & Police Abuse

Stay abreast of Climate Change and human rights activism, and learn where you can make a difference.

DoveTales Call for Submissions

DoveTales, a publication of Writing for PeaceDoveTales, a publication of Writing for PeaceWriting for Peace is now accepting submissions for our 2015 “Nature” edition of DoveTales, An International Journal of the Arts. Read our guidelines and submit here.

Young Writers Contest Now Open!

2015 Young Writers Contest JudgesCheck out our 2015 Young Writers Contest! Writing for Peace has received entries from young writers with a passion for peace from 24 countries. Go to www.writingforpeace.org to meet our previous winners and learn about our wonderful panel of judges: Antonya Nelson, fiction; Stephen Kuusisto, poetry; and Steve Almond, nonfiction. Read the full guidelines here.

Support Writing for Peace; Purchase Our Latest Edition Of DoveTales

2014 DoveTales, "Contrast" EditionThe 2014 DoveTales, “Contrast” Edition is now available for purchase. The issue is themed “contrast” and includes the beautiful black and white photography of Writing for Peace Artist-in-Residence Paula Dawn Lietz, as well as the 2013 Young Writers Contest winners, and the following contributors:

Jordi Alonso, Cassandra Arnold, Maggie Bàra, Henry Braun, Lorraine Caputo, William Cass, Lorraine Currelley, Colin Dodds, John Garmon, Diane Giardi, Mark Goad, Veronica Golos, Sam Hamill, Dawnell Harrison, D. Iasevoli, Ed.D, Allan M. Jalon, Shelley Kahn, Richard Krawiec, Paula Dawn Lietz, Cory Lockhart, Shannon K. Lockhart, Veronica Marshall, Sandra McGarry, Iwona Partyka, Sy Roth, Andrew Sacks, Carol Smallwood, Julia Stein, Samantha Peters Terrell, Bänoo Zan

Copyright © 2014 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

Voice To The Voiceless, by Patricia Jabbeh Wesley

Writing for Peace is excited to introduce three wonderful new members of our advisory panel: Robert Kostuck, Djelloul Marbrook, and Patricia Jabbeh Wesley. Each of our new advisers has achieved an inspiring level of personal integrity in their work, and dedicated their writing toward the advancement of truth, justice, and peace.

In the last (but not least) of three introductory posts, meet Writing for Peace Adviser, Patricia Jabbeh Wesley.

Patricia Jabbeh Wesley, Writing for Peace Adviser“I’m joining Writing for Peace because as an activist for peace, my career as a writer has been about giving voice to the voiceless in a world constantly at war.”

~Patricia Jabbeh Wesley

Patricia Jabbeh Wesley is a survivor of the Liberian civil war, immigrating to the United States in 1991. She is the author of four books of poetry: Where the Road Turns, (Autumn House Press, 2010), The River is Rising (Autumn House Press, 2007), Becoming Ebony, (SIU Press, 2003) and Before the Palm Could Bloom: Poems of Africa (New Issues Press, 1998). In 2013, she published her first children’s book, In Monrovia, the River Visits the Sea (One Moore Book Publishers, 2013). Her fifth book of poetry, “Biography, When the Wanderers Come Home,” is forthcoming in the spring of 2015.

Patricia Jabbeh Wesley, Writing for Peace AdviserShe has won several awards and grants, including the 2011 President Barack Obama Award for her writings from Blair County NAACP, the 2010 Liberian Award for her poetry, a Penn State University AESEDA Collaborative Grant for her research on Liberian Women’s Trauma stories, a 2002 Crab Orchard Award for her second book of poems, Becoming Ebony, an Irving S. Gilmore Emerging Artist Grant from the Kalamazoo Foundation, a World Bank Fellowship, among others. Patricia has a Ph.D. in Creative Writing and English from Western Michigan University, a Master of Science degree in Eng. Education from Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, and a BA in English from the University of Liberia, Monrovia, Liberia. She is a regular, featured Poet/Study Abroad faculty and speaker both in the US and internationally, and her poetry has been critically acclaimed by many reviewers and scholarly publications worldwide. She has also published dozens of individual poems and memoir articles in many US and international journals and anthologies, including in the New Orleans Review, Crab Orchard Review, English Academy Review of South Africa, The Prometeo Magazine, Bedford/St. Martin’s Approaching Literature: Writing, Reading, Thinking, 2nd & 3rd editions, among others.

Patricia Jabbeh Wesley, Writing for Peace AdviserPatricia also owns and manages a popular blog, Patricia Jabbeh Wesley’s International Blog on Poetry for Peace. She is an Associate Professor of English and Creative Writing at Penn State University’s Altoona campus. She is presently working on a memoir of her Liberian civil war experience.

Links:

www.pjabbeh.com

http://poetryforpeace.wordpress.com/

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Writing for Peace News

Climate Alarm Is Ringing – And Until Now the United Nations Has Failed To Act – See more at: http://www.occupy.com/article/climate-alarm-ringing-%E2%80%93-and-until-now-united-nations-has-failed-act#sthash.GrDFZqEW.dpuf
Climate Alarm Is Ringing – And Until Now the United Nations Has Failed To Act – See more at: http://www.occupy.com/article/climate-alarm-ringing-%E2%80%93-and-until-now-united-nations-has-failed-act#sthash.GrDFZqEW.dpuf

Climate Alarm Is Ringing – And Until Now The United Nations Has Failed To Act

by Writing for Peace Adviser Margaret Flowers, and Kevin Zeese

Dr. Margaret Flowers, Writing for Peace AdviserThe recent report by the intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is the most worrisome so far. Paired with data from the 2014 national Climate Assessment, there is no question that the climate crisis is here and is accelerating at a faster pace than predicted. It’s affects are widespread and dangerous, yet real solutions are being suppressed. Read the article here.

 DoveTales Call for Submissions

DoveTales, a publication of Writing for PeaceWriting for Peace is now accepting submissions for our 2015 “Nature” edition of DoveTales, An International Journal of the Arts. Read our guidelines and submit here.

Young Writers Contest Now Open!

2015 Young Writers Contest JudgesOur Young Writers Contest is now open! To date, Writing for Peace has received entries from young writers with a passion for peace from 24 countries. Go to www.writingforpeace.org to meet our previous winners and learn about our wonderful panel of judges: Antonya Nelson, fiction; Stephen Kuusisto, poetry; and Steve Almond, nonfiction. Read the full guidelines here.

he recent report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is the most worrisome so far. Paired with data from the 2014 National Climate Assessment, there is no question that the climate crisis is here and is accelerating at a faster pace than predicted. Its effects are widespread and dangerous, yet real solutions are being suppressed. – See more at: http://www.occupy.com/article/climate-alarm-ringing-%E2%80%93-and-until-now-united-nations-has-failed-act#sthash.GrDFZqEW.dpuf
Climate Alarm Is Ringing – And Until Now the United Nations Has Failed To Act

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The recent report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is the most worrisome so far. Paired with data from the 2014 National Climate Assessment, there is no question that the climate crisis is here and is accelerating at a faster pace than predicted. Its effects are widespread and dangerous, yet real solutions are being suppressed.

– See more at: http://www.occupy.com/article/climate-alarm-ringing-%E2%80%93-and-until-now-united-nations-has-failed-act#sthash.GrDFZqEW.dpuf

Support Writing for Peace By Purchasing Our Latest Edition Of DoveTales

The recent report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is the most worrisome so far. Paired with data from the 2014 National Climate Assessment, there is no question that the climate crisis is here and is accelerating at a faster pace than predicted. Its effects are widespread and dangerous, yet real solutions are being suppressed. – See more at: http://www.occupy.com/article/climate-alarm-ringing-%E2%80%93-and-until-now-united-nations-has-failed-act#sthash.GrDFZqEW.dpuf

2014 DoveTales, "Contrast" Edition2014 DoveTales, “Contrast” edition, is now available for purchase. The 2014 issue is themed “contrast” and includes the beautiful black and white photography of Writing for Peace Artist-in-Residence Paula Dawn Lietz, as well as the 2013 Young Writers Contest winners, and the following contributors:

Jordi Alonso, Cassandra Arnold, Maggie Bàra, Henry Braun, Lorraine Caputo, William Cass, Lorraine Currelley, Colin Dodds, John Garmon, Diane Giardi, Mark Goad, Veronica Golos, Sam Hamill, Dawnell Harrison, D. Iasevoli, Ed.D, Allan M. Jalon, Shelley Kahn, Richard Krawiec, Paula Dawn Lietz, Cory Lockhart, Shannon K. Lockhart, Veronica Marshall, Sandra McGarry, Iwona Partyka, Sy Roth, Andrew Sacks, Carol Smallwood, Julia Stein, Samantha Peters Terrell, Bänoo Zan

Copyright © 2014 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.