Every Conversation on Peace Matters: The 2019 Online Youth Summit

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Every Conversation on Peace Matters:
Our 2019 Online Youth Summit

By Mary Carroll-Hackett

In Spring 2014, I had a guest speaker in the two sections of a Writing for Active Citizenship I was teaching, a combat-decorated Marine and Longwood alum, who had asked to speak to my classes about local political engagement. He began his presentation by projecting a large photo, one that had played across the media for months, of the 2013 Egyptian Revolution. Even with the picture filled with images of the Egyptian flag, not a single student in the two sections, not one in forty, could identify what was taking place in the picture.

The next class period, I asked them why they felt that had happened. Their answers covered a range of reasons for what they themselves called disconnect, from not knowing what media to trust, to being too busy surviving their own lives, to the one they all agreed upon: being overwhelmed with the fear and sadness such connection created, overwhelmed in the face of twenty-four hour news coverage which led to what they said paralyzed them most: feeling overwhelmed with helplessness. I asked them how we, as educators, could help with that, how we could help them connect. I asked them What would you most connect to—listen to? Their answer: our peers. They all said they wanted two things in support of creating such a personal global connection: to hear from “people who look like us, our age,” and to learn about real, doable actions they could make in their daily lives, as both a way to help those who needed it across the planet, and as a way to combat their own feelings of helplessness.

This is how the Writing for Peace Online Youth Summit came into being.
As we prepare for the third annual summit, to take place Saturday, October 12, 2019, we are more committed than ever to honoring what those young people seek, and to both take and create every opportunity we can to advance conversations that will move us all toward more understanding and compassion.

This year, we are particularly focusing on the What Can We Do question posed by the young people with whom we’ve spoken. Our 2019 keynotes are all young activists who have been working for real change on the front-lines of their communities, and who have been engaged in this way since they were very young. They exemplify the power and effect young people can have in their own communities, and the vision of leaders who, rather than a future preying on fear and dividing us, will work, as they already are, to build community where we care and support each other.

Taikein Cooper 2019 PhotoTaikein Cooper was canvassing throughout Virginia’s communities as an 11-year-old to help elect his D.A.R.E (Drug Abuse Resistance Education) teacher, Travis Harris, as Prince Edward County’s Sheriff, beginning the life of service he now lives, in local and regional politics and service initiatives, and as Executive Director of Virginia Excels, an education advocacy organization that focuses on educational equity by amplifying the voices of students and families. He also co-hosts the socio-political podcast, Ain’t No Free Lunch, with Ms. Danielle Greene.

Hazel Edwards 2019 PhotoHazel Edwards is an artist, community advocate and educator, who works as The Educator and Outreach Specialist in The Bryson Institute of The Attic Youth Center in Philadelphia. Among numerous other advocacy projects, Hazel has presented and led workshops in Philadelphia and across the country for hundreds of service providers and youth on gender, sexuality, racism, and antioppression. She also co-facilitated a 9-month high school social justice internship, where she taught 18 interns on systems of oppression and organizing skills. In 2016, Hazel was instrumental in co-authoring the School District of Philadelphia’s Policy 252, which created protections for transgender and gender nonconforming students.

Jason Tsai 2019 photoJason Tsai, a young leader dedicated to working in support of food access, especially in urban food deserts, has worked as an urban agriculture fellow and food distribution coordinator at Tricycle Urban Ag, in Richmond, Virginia. There, he worked on urban farms to grow and distribute organic produce through corner store partners for food desert communities. He specializes in the art of making “good” food that is responsible to the soul and to the earth.

Marni von Wilpert 2019 PhotoMarni von Wilpert, a young attorney originally from San Diego, served in the Peace Corps in Botswana, Africa from 2006 to 2008, working on treatment, prevention, and care for children and adults living with HIV/AIDS, then went on as one of 28 young legal professionals nationwide to be awarded the Skadden Fellowship for Public Interest law, where she worked with the Mississippi Center for Justice to create the first HIV-related civil rights law practice in the state to provide free legal services to people living with HIV/AIDS facing discrimination in employment, housing, and access to healthcare. Marni also worked as an Associate Labor Counsel for the Economic Policy Institute in Washington, D.C., monitoring and evaluating federal and state legislation and regulations affecting workers’ rights, wages and working conditions. Marni moved back home to San Diego in 2017 and now works as a Deputy City Attorney in the Civil Litigation Division of the San Diego City Attorney’s Office. She is a graduate of Emerge California and is running for San Diego City Council in the 2020 election cycle.

Each of these amazing people have stories to tell of their own activist journeys, as well as wisdom, experience, and advice to offer to our summit participants, on how each of us can work toward change, toward, justice, toward peace, in our own communities, in our daily lives.

In addition to the keynotes, we’re inviting submissions of creative work from all over the world, and especially interested in multilingual work, on any topic creatively exploring working toward peace in daily ways.

This year’s summit, with its conversations on the power of individual, community, and grassroots activism, exploring what we as individuals can do in our day to day lives to work toward the peace we all desire and deserve, reminds us: One person can make a difference. Together, we can change the world. We sincerely hope you’ll join us.

Mary Carroll-Hackett, Writing for Peace Adviser2Mary Carroll-Hackett is an adviser and member of the Writing for Peace Board of Directors, and the author of The Real Politics of LipstickAnimal Soul, If We Could Know Our Bones, The Night I Heard Everything, Trailer Park Oracle, and A Little Blood, A Little Rain. Her newest collection of prose poems, Death for Beginners, will be out from Kelsey Books in September 2017. Learn more about Writing for Peace Adviser Mary Carroll-Hackett and her work here.

Copyright © 2019 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

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2019 Announcements

41716478_541593026272917_3315322037882322944_n (2)Hello friends,

We have some big changes to tell you about! Our Board of Directors is working to make Writing for Peace more accessible to readers all over the globe and whittle away at geographic and language barriers. Coming highlights include:

DoveTales, An International Journal of the Arts

Writing for Peace has published six beautiful print journals, but in 2019, DoveTales is going online. We will publish two issues per year, February 1st and August 1st. You can find the Guidelines here.

2019 Youth Summit

We are inviting translations this year, and working to achieve multilingual participation. The theme for this year’s Youth Summit is “Day By Day, Hand in Hand: Seeing & Creating Peace in Daily Action.” The online event will be held on Saturday, October 12, 2019, 8am-6pm EST and is limited to 50 participants. Submissions must be received by September 15th, 2019. Learn more, here.

2019 Young Writers Contest

Our Young Writers contest is up and running! Winners will be published on August 1st, 2019, in our first online DoveTales, guest edited by Writing for Peace Adviser Patricia Jabbeh Wesley. Check out the Contest Guidelines here.

You’ll see lots of other changes this year, and we’ll keep you apprised of developments along the way. We’re looking forward to sharing an exciting 2019 with you!

Yours in peace,

Carmel

Carmel Mawle is president and founder of Writing for Peace. She writes from the northern Colorado Rocky Mountains where she lives with her husband and Max, a ten-pound border terrier mix who firmly believes he’s a mountain dog. You can find her blog at www.carmelmawle.com.

Copyright © 2019 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

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The Giving Season

“Through education and creative writing, Writing for Peace seeks to cultivate the empathy that allows minds to open to new cultural views, to value the differences as well as the hopes and dreams that unite all of humanity, to develop a spirit of leadership and peaceful activism.”

~Writing for Peace Mission Statement

Carmel-Laughing-1It’s almost December, the “Giving Season,” and I’m consumed with which size Legos I should buy for my 4-year-old grandson, all my grandchildren’s ever-changing clothing sizes, and what to get for the older males on my list who seem to already have everything I can think of. A gift certificate to one of the chain restaurants? Belly-dancing lessons?

The looming specter of December 31st brings out the flip-side of this month of giving – the asking.  My inbox is full of requests from nonprofit organizations, many of them desperate for the funds to continue much needed services, or to begin life-changing programs.

I’ve worked for three 501c3 nonprofits, and have always struggled to ask for financial help. When I was director of a youth orchestra, we were fortunate to have an extensive donor list. My job was to remind them of the many benefits of music for developing minds, the increased college acceptances and scholarship rates, the services and opportunities we provided to our musicians, and the cost of these programs, which didn’t come close to what we brought in through student tuition income. I wrote the letters and program asks from the bottom of my heart, and even occasionally stood on a stage and made the appeal directly, a task I absolutely dreaded. But this is the nature of running a nonprofit, and I did it because I believed we were making a difference in the lives of those young people, and our community as a whole. That was true when I was president of a chamber music association and, even more so, true today with Writing for Peace.

Because I see first hand what our need is, Writing for Peace is at the top of my husband’s and my giving list. There are other important causes we divvy out our end-of-the-year donations to (Doctor’s Without Borders among them), but the Writing for Peace mission seems imperative to me. If we can’t afford the latest super-cool sneakers for our grandchildren, maybe we can leave them a world that is a little bit kinder.

So, yes, despite my aversion to “the ask,” I’m doing it today because I know what depends on it. I owe it to our young writers, and all of our Writing for Peace family, to do what has always been difficult for me.

Our administration is board operated, and all directors and advisers work on a volunteer basis, so 100% of contributions go to support our mission. Writing for Peace is a 501c3 nonprofit corporation, Federal Tax ID Number, 45-2968027. You can donate directly here.

If you are able to set a little aside for Writing for Peace, thank you. And, whether you’re able to contribute financially, or not, we appreciate all you do for us, for each other, and for a better world.

Wishing you and yours joy this holiday season.

With love and appreciation,

Carmel

Carmel Mawle is president and founder of Writing for Peace. She writes from the northern Colorado Rocky Mountains where she lives with her husband and Max, a ten-pound border terrier mix who firmly believes he’s a mountain dog. You can find her blog at www.carmelmawle.com.

Copyright © 2018 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

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Thanksgiving Wishes

carmel and maxDear Writing for Peace Family,

I’m thinking this morning about all of you, our wonderful directors, inspiring advisers, and amazing contributors, Young Writers and readers, with gratitude.

There are times (especially in the last two years) when discouragement takes on a life of its own, much like the cartoon characters with black clouds hovering over their heads day after day as they go about their business. What they don’t have that we do is the community, support, and encouragement of each other.

I can never feel discouraged for long when I think of all of you, approaching each day with an emphasis not on what you can’t accomplish, but what you can. You chip away at seemingly insurmountable obstacles, smile at neighbors and strangers, and do your civic duties with diligence and good cheer. The work created in this spirit adds light and wisdom to our collective consciousness and humanity as a whole, making hope a beautiful and tangible thing.

From all of us at Writing for Peace, many thanks for your ongoing support and all that you do to make this world a better place. Whether you are in the U.S. or elsewhere on this exquisite globe, we wish you a very Happy Thanksgiving.

Much love and appreciation,

Carmel

Carmel Mawle is president and founder of Writing for Peace. She writes from the northern Colorado Rocky Mountains where she lives with her husband and Max, a ten-pound border terrier mix who firmly believes he’s a mountain dog. You can find her blog at www.carmelmawle.com.

Copyright © 2018 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

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Historical Change, by Carmel Mawle

41644111_304358337033968_3514319838484889600_n-1 (2)As founder and president of the board of directors, I want to clarify that Writing for Peace is a Not-for-Profit (501c3) entity and, as such, we do not endorse political candidates. Our goal is to encourage young writers to do their own research and empower them to make a difference in the causes that are important to them.

With that disclaimer, I want to emphasize that I write now as a citizen of these United States, exercising my First Amendment rights.

It cannot be denied that the United States I love, the nation in which I was born and raised, has an abhorrent history. Built upon a foundation of genocide and slavery, much of the folklore around “old glory” is thinly veiled propaganda. But, like mythologies over the eons, there are truths, and something to be learned of both the best and worst of human nature.

George Washington, who led the American resisters to victory, became known to the Native Americans as “Town Destroyer.” After decimating a village, his troops would skin the bodies of Iroquois from the hips down to make “leather stockings.”

Abraham Lincoln, one of my personal favorites (and I highly recommend George Saunder’s novel, Lincoln in the Bardo), ended the Civil War and emancipated the slaves. But he also ordered the largest mass execution, 38 Sioux men who had been accused of war crimes.

The United States has (and continues to) supported dictators, interfered with sovereign nations, and committed war crimes and, despite rhetoric to the contrary, capitalism is more often than not the driving force behind both foreign and domestic policies.

There have, of course, been historical high marks. The signing, on December 10th, 1948, of The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, showed aspirations of our highest selves. In retrospect, I have to wonder if witnessing the worst of humanity at the close of WWII and the knowledge that U.S. corporations were collaborating and profiting by German atrocities while our soldiers gave their lives fighting fascism, had reached something deep within each of us, our responsibility to our brothers and sisters. Whatever it was, our government has studiously avoided being held accountable for violations of that signed declaration (or the Geneva Conventions) ever since.

Still, we have made some progress. We’ve made advancements in Civil Rights, Women’s Rights, and Environmental Rights (among others). I’m sitting here trying to remember whether that has ever happened without a fight. Would I sound too cynical if I said that, unless the oligarchy also profits by those advancements, they won’t be given to us on a silver platter? No, when it comes to human rights, we have historically had to demand change.

We march, we protest, we write letters and create art and raise awareness so our numbers will continue to swell. And brave journalists are at the forefront of these battles, showing us body bags and civilian casualties, the dogs and billy clubs and lynchings. They show us Black Lives destroyed by police brutality, white supremacism once again empowered to raise its ugly entitled head, refugees at our borders and detained children, school shootings and N.R.A. funded representatives with their bulging pockets, floods and fires and an unprotected environment in decline, and perhaps worst of all, voter suppression.

Current events, and our checkered past, have shown us that we can’t count on our government to do the right thing. Change depends on you and me.

If there was ever a time to march or write for peace it is now. Join me in marching to your polling station, filling out your ballot, and signing your name. Vote. Alone we may be a single wavering candle, but together we are the sun, shining light on this administration’s lies and oppression.

And if you need help getting to the polls, contact me at my personal website. I’ll help you in whatever way I can. We’re in this together.

Now, back to our regular programming: Thank you for supporting Writing for Peace.

~~~

Carmel Mawle writes from the northern Colorado Rocky Mountains where she lives with her husband and Max, a ten-pound border terrier mix who firmly believes he’s a mountain dog. You can find her blog at www.carmelmawle.com.

 

Copyright © 2018 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

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In This Moment, by Lacey Knight

In This Moment

By Lacey Knight

Lacey KnightI was in a waiting room this morning, my 18-month-old on my lap, when I realized the television was tuned to Dr. Christine Blasey Ford’s testimony before the senate panel. As I intently read the subtitles, a young woman walked in and sat directly across from me. She was young and beautiful, conservatively dressed, and appeared quite self-possessed. I was suddenly self-conscious of my dirty hair, “mom” clothes, and the clearness with which I wear my emotions. I felt vulnerable sharing this moment with a stranger who, in my quick “analysis,” struck me as impermeable.

Still, I was drawn to the interview of this brave woman speaking her truths to our country. It opened a place in me that, in recent years, has been opened again and again. Her words shined a light on dark areas of my personal history. Watching her was painful, knowing that so many discredited her already. Knowing that she’ll suffer greatly for her courage. Knowing that my daughters are going to live in a time where woman are guilty until proven innocent.

My name was called and I snapped back to the waiting room, looking over sheepishly as I remembered my company. The young woman was leaning towards the T.V., her hands clasped together, the exact same look of pain streaked across her face as I know I’d been wearing on mine. She caught my eye as I stood and nodded to me, acknowledging what we had both shared.

In that moment, I wanted to shield her from the world and its harsh judgments; I wanted to hug her; I wanted to be her mom, a safe place for her. I felt extreme gratitude for Dr. Ford and her bravery. Gratitude to all those who continue to give a voice to the trauma and abuse while so many suffer in silence. Gratitude that this moment of truth was heard. Gratitude that my daughters will have champions of their own to lead them through their journeys, and gratitude that my heart was softened by it.

Thank-you, Dr. Ford.

 

Lacey Knight is a mom of three, business owner and a lover of words. She currently expresses herself through journaling, social media, coloring books and the occasional HR paperwork. As a woman business owner with an all female staff and mother to two daughters, she believes passionately in women empowering women and the power of strong community.

 

Copyright © 2018 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

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Different Walks

Rachelle header2

Different Walks

By Rachelle Mawle

I’ve been thinking a lot about the state of public discourse, lately. So much of the conflict seems to center on long-held beliefs. And many of those who most adamantly cling to extreme views on politics, religion, and the social safety net, don’t seem to have experienced much beyond childhood parameters.

I know there are exceptions to the rule. Many young people emerge from their childhood bubbles with curiosity, bursting into the world with an open mind and a desire to learn about other faiths and cultures. But, more and more, that seems to be the exception rather than the rule. So, I’m going to speak in generalities here, because right now it’s the other young people I’m most curious about.

Why is it that a child raised in one religion, the faith of their family, clings most tightly not to the sacred texts, but to the belief that their viewpoint is the only right one? And reinforce that belief by assuring themselves that everyone else is wrong or naive? Why is it that a person who (by sheer luck) is born into wealth and privilege can look at those in need of financial assistance and automatically assume that human being is a waste of money? Is it simply a lack of life experience and education, or a merciless cocktail of nature and nurture?

A concerning skin growth recently sent me trekking into Atlanta to visit a dermatologist. Doctor visits are always stressful, but adding the possibility of skin cancer had made me a nervous wreck. I was grateful that my fiancé and son could go with me. The doctor recognized that I was worried about the biopsy. She was kind and reassuring, talking about where she was raised, sharing that she had attended Stanford Medical School.

“How do you like Georgia?” she asked.

“It’s a definite adjustment,” I answered. I told her about my futile attempts to get my son into a decent school, and how I’d never had to worry about my son’s education in Fort Collins.

“I attended some wonderful private schools, growing up,” she said. “There are some good ones nearby.”

I smiled politely. “Unfortunately, we don’t have the income for private schools. It’s looking like we might just have to home school.”

I was baffled by her response.

“What a wonderful opportunity!” she said. “It’s so beneficial to be home schooled! And how lucky your child is to be taught by his parents! Really, more people should do that, I often wonder if I had been home schooled how much more I would have learned.”

Right. Let them eat cake. Oh, how lucky, I thought, that so many children don’t have access to quality education. For parents who aren’t wealthy (like this doctor), there are only two options. Enroll your child in a crappy school, or home school them. Heaven forbid both parents have to work to make a living, or perhaps don’t have the mental or emotional resources to educate their children on their own.

I just smiled again, and said “You’re right, my boy’s lucky.”

The doctor was raised with privilege. She seemed to be a caring person, but really had no idea how people below her demographic lived or what issues they had to face.

I have to wonder if even a Stanford Medical degree is not as beneficial as walking a mile in another physician’s stilettos – or in my case (on this particular day), Target flip-flops.

If an infant was born and grew up inside a box, they would emerge believing the world was a cube. Empathy and compassion develop from a personal effort to continue growth and education beyond what our parents or schools taught us. The reality is we never graduate from the need to continue learning. And we have much to learn from each other, from our different walks.

No one, no matter race, education, or finances, is superior to another.

We are all human beings.

***

Rachelle and Cory 2Rachelle Mawle is a writer, blogger, homeschool teacher, and devoted mother to a ten year old boy and two fur babies who test her on a daily basis. She recently moved to Atlanta, GA, from Fort Collins, CO, to be with her fiancé, and is still in the process of adjusting…maybe forever. Check out her blog at www.anotherdailydisaster.com.

 

Copyright © 2018 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

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Let’s Catch Up!

41716478_541593026272917_3315322037882322944_n (2)While our blog has been quiet, our board and contributors have been busy. There has been much activity on our Writing for Peace Facebook page. If you haven’t had a chance to check out our 2018 DoveTales Book Launch Celebration, you’re really missing something. The vine readings are absolutely wonderful. You can go straight to our video library on the page, but we’ll also have them on our site in the next couple of weeks. We still have several promised vines from contributors and board members. We’ll keep posting them as long as they keep coming in!

Developments among migrant and refugee communities have been heartbreaking. Detained children continue to be separated from their parents at unprecedented numbers. Many of our writers are actively resisting these (and so many other) injustices. Thank you for your work, and please continue to keep us posted on your progress and stamina. Let us know how our community can support your work.

Our thoughts are with those in the path of the hurricane. Wishing you safety from the storm.

In peace,

Carmel Mawle
President and Founder
mawlecarmel@gmail.com

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Empathy in Art: Embracing the Other Book Launch Celebration

2018 DoveTales Front coverWe are excited to announce the coming release of our sixth edition of DoveTales, an International Journal of the Arts. Our latest book is themed and titled Empathy in Art: Embracing the Other and features the work of 70 writers and artists from countries all over the globe, examining the far-reaching implications of empathy through their chosen art forms, as well as the winning work from both our 2017 and 2018 Young Writers Contest.

We hope you’ll join us for our online book launch celebration with a series of short video readings from our tables to yours. You’ll find these sumptuous readings on our Facebook Page beginning on August 15th, 2018.

This book is rich with imagery, taking the idea of  “embracing the other” a step further, with the hope of sharing nourishment and breaking bread together. You’ll find that many of our contributors lingered in the tastes and fragrances of sustenance. Some of our advisers’ have even shared their favorite recipes!

Dedicated to the memory of Sam Hamill, who passed away this spring, Empathy in Art: Embracing the Other, features two fabulous advisers, Patricia Jabbeh Wesley and Wang Ping.

Front Cover: Christopher Woods, “All About Free.”

Available for pre-order now, here!

Book Description:
DoveTales, An International Journal of the Arts, “Empathy in Art: Embracing the Other” edition features poetry, essays,  and short stories from our 2017 and 2018 Young Contest Winners, our advisers, established, and emerging writers, as well as strikingly beautiful art and photography.

$14.95 Paperback, 436 Pages

Copyright © 2018 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

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2018 Young Writers Contest Winners

Gandhi gentle way quill

2018 Young Writers Contest Winners

Judges: Patricia Jabbeh Wesley, poetry; Adriana Páramo, nonfiction; and Djelloul Marbrook, fiction

Participating in the Writing for Peace Young Writers Contest takes a commitment to research, an open mind, and refining the craft of writing. The work that came in from young writers across the globe exemplified this commitment. It has been an honor and privilege to read them. In the words of Writing for Peace Adviser and Judge Djelloul Marbrook: “First, it has been a privilege and a pleasure to read these stories, not a chore. All of them are well written, poignant and eye-opening…I urge each of these writers to continue blessing us with their work.”

We would like to thank our judges for taking the time to read and consider our young writers’ entries. We would also like to acknowledge all of the young writers who took the time to research a new culture and write a story, essay, or poem for the Writing for Peace Young Writers Contest. Completing this challenge is no small achievement, and we salute your commitment to expanding your knowledge base and developing your craft. We would also like to thank the teachers and mentors who encouraged their students to take our challenge, and then inspired and guided them to prepare their best work.

In Poetry~

First Place: Anna Yang from Saratoga, California, for “I Remember.”

Second Place: Booyeon Choi from Concord Massachusets, for “Fragments.”

Third Place: Lisa Zou from Chandler, Arizona for “Bodhisattva.”

In Fiction~

First Place: Sarah Ryu from Exeter, New Hampshire, for “The Hummingbird (Huitzilli).”

Second Place:  Chang Hyeon Park from Seoul, South Korea, for “Just A Little bit of Patience.”

Third Place:  David Gorodetsky from Coquitlam, British Columbia, Canada, for “Bleached Flour in Unbleached Hands.”

In Nonfiction~

First Place: Carolyn Qu from Smithtown, New York, for “The South Korean Suicide Epidemic.”

Second Place: Sally Liu from Holzheim, Bayern, Germany, for “Where Do You Come from?”

Third Place: Yu-Chen Lim from Coquitlam, British Columbia, Canada for “The Merchant.”

Finalists~

Poetry: Michael Pieruccini & Jasmine Dhaliwal

Fiction: Minsung Kim & Alex Kim

Nonfiction: Lily See

Congratulations to one and all!

Copyright © 2018 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

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