Peter Street’s Natural World Poetry: Earth Talks

Adviser Peter Street was diagnosed with autism six years ago. At 70, Street believes his incredible life is in large part thanks to his autism. A qualified Arboriculturist and environmentalist who writes on Green issues, his book Trees Will Be Trees was published with Shoestring Press. He launched his last book, Listening to The Dark, at the Albuquerque Lit Festival, where he appeared during a tour of Midwest America funded by Professor Fred Whitehead, retired. Preeta Press published his memoir: Hidden Depths: Life and Loves of A Young Gravedigger. Street was recently interviewed with the BBC “1800 Seconds on Autism” and Readers Digest interviewed him about his work as someone with five successful poetry books with an international readership. John Harris, in his Guardian Weekend stated, “Peter Street was the most interesting person I have ever interviewed.”

Even when Street writes of the wars of men, a strong current of the natural runs through his poetry. Below, are two poems previously published in Thumbing From Lipik to Pakrac, by Waterloo Press.

 

Trigger Happy

They were trees being trees
minding their own business
on the corner next to the swimming pool
in Lipik

Christ’s sake, just standing
on the corner
until snipers blew
their tops out

target practice,
keeping their eye in
there were trees

and there were bodies
all over the place
you should have seen it

on second thoughts

*

Dunscar Cenotaph 

                                for Thomas Edgar Street
Pals, all of them
buried there right in front of us
underneath “Keep Off The Grass”,
as if they’ve been carried here
from where ever they fell
for me and dad

who, every time we stand here
on the edge, holds his black trilby
tight to his chest

trying to tell me
about his trench
and something or other
about some gas

I almost lose balance
and stumble
into their sacred ground
on top of them

*

In his latest collection, Earth Talks (forthcoming by Caparison Press), Peter Street addresses what amounts to a war against the natural world. “The book is about a parliament of flowers coming together to talk about the harm humans have caused over the centuries- but it’s also about the advent of climate change,” says Street. “The plants in the past have been silent bystanders- but now that has come to an end – they think it’s time for action.”

About Earth Talks, Caron Freeborn, poet and university lecturer says, “In some ways, this is different from Street’s other work: more overtly politicized, less filled with people, and yet many of the same things occur: spare, usable language; the sound(s) of natural speech condensed to drive the poetry; attention to the power of white space. Anyone engaging with this book will leave it more informed; as William Carlos Williams said: ‘It is difficult / to get the news from poems / yet men die miserably every day / for lack / of what is found there’. We all die miserably for want of what is found in Peter Street’s deceptively simple yet rigorous work. Everything natural is beautiful and itself and a metaphor at the same time; everything is dangerous and true ‘remembering those poor beetles / who tested the waters and teased the millions of elms into suicide / even then we were still ignored’. This is a book we all need to read.”

Saying No to The Icebergs

Sand Sedge    Carex arenaria 

like all families we have fought

put it behind us
an army is washing
towards us

waves of them
from land of ice and water
we have to be ready

or be washed away

come and stand with us
here next to my triangular stems
shields against their salt-burn

we have to slow those waves down

take the battle to them   here
on these dunes
Sand Sedges are natural warriors

we take root   colonise
safe in numbers
know what we have to do
are you with us

*
Congratulations to Writing for Peace Adviser Peter Street on the completion of this latest powerful collection, Earth Talks, by Caparison Press. The book and ebook can be preordered for £6, plus postage, by contacting Peter at peter.street3@googlemail.com


Exciting Writing for Peace Publishing News

December 2nd, 2019

DoveTales logoWe are thrilled to announce that, due to popular demand, Writing for Peace will continue the annual tradition of publishing a print edition of DoveTales, An International  Journal of the Arts in addition to our twice annual DoveTales Online. Our 2019 DoveTales Anthology will be available for purchase beginning next week, featuring Guest Editor Patricia Jabbeh Wesley’s One World, One People summer edition, including contributors from all over the globe, and the winners of our 2019 Young Writers Contest. Coming Monday, December 9th, the 2019 DoveTales Anthology makes the ideal holiday gift!

Copyright © 2019 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

Take Your Dream Body to the Gym, a Writing Exercise by Victoria Hanley

Denmark Evacuees at the Gymnasium at Trinity College Carmarthen, London, 1940. Public Domain.

Take Your Dream Body to the Gym

A Writing Exercise by Adviser Victoria Hanley

It’s my belief that just as you have a physical body, you also have a dream body. You might not be able to see it but you can sure feel it—and it needs to be exercised. Just like a physical body, when it’s neglected, it can get out of shape—to the point of appearing puny, flabby, and weak. Sometimes under the crush of worldly struggles, it can even seem to have died. But it hasn’t. As long as you’re alive, so is your dream body! And with exercise, it gets stronger.

I’m not saying everything will automatically fall into place right away once you start to exercise your dream body. If you went to a gym and someone said, “Getting in shape will be super easy and after the first week, you’ll be able to lift 500 pounds,” you would know that’s a lie. Same with the dream body. It can’t be expected to lift all the weights connected to your dream right away. And if the dream is to write a book, be prepared to face some heavy weights—such as doubt and frustration and rejection, to name a few. Don’t let that stop you.

Part of exercising a dream body is to treat it as real, and part of treating it as real is to give it a little time each day.

Writing Exercise: Each day for a week, write down your dreams for your life. It doesn’t matter if right now you don’t see how they could come true. What matters is writing them down.


Victoria Hanley, Writing for Peace AdviserVictoria Hanley’s novels have been published in 12 languages, won many honors and awards at home and abroad, and inspired two nonfiction writing books: Seize the Story: A Handbook for Teens Who Like to Write, and Wild Ink: Success Secrets to Writing and Publishing in the Young Adult Market. She teaches writing at Lighthouse Writers Workshop in Denver and at Northern Colorado Writers in Fort Collins. Learn more about Victoria’s books, read her blog, download a free chapter of Wild Ink, and watch Victoria in action at www.victoriahanley.com.


Writing for Peace News

October 15th, 2019

Reading Period for Winter DoveTales Online Will Close Nov. 1st

Guest Edited by Writing for Peace Adviser, Robert Kostuck, our February issue of DoveTales Online is themed, “Gardens in the Desert: Cultivating Awareness.” Broadly interpreted, this theme can encompass:

— Emotional, psychic, intellectual, physical, or social growth.

— The myriad ways we plant, nurture, harvest, or reap.

— Real or metaphorical gardens as destinations, refuges, nexus points of transformation, or starting points.

— Relationships real or imagined: the arid and/or seemingly empty places in interpersonal connections. The spaces in-between. Memory gaps, the gaps between intention and action, the passage of time forgotten. Empty pages, deleted hard drives, houses emptied of possessions, minds cleared of thoughts and desires.

— Bringing life to actual deserts, urban deserts, arctic deserts, lives that are deserts, relationships that are deserts, deserts of the past or future.

— Awareness = seeking, cultivating, residing in, exemplifying.

Submissions of poetry, fiction, non-fiction, interviews, art, and photography are all welcome.

Young Writers Contest: One Grand Prize winner will be awarded $200

Our 2020 Young Writers Contest is officially open!  Writing for Peace challenges young writers (ages 13-19) to expand their empathy skills by researching an unfamiliar culture and writing from the point-of-view of a character within that new world, while exploring social, political, and environmental pressures, and universal themes. There is no fee for participation. Writers, ages 13-19, may submit in one of three categories – poetry, fiction, or nonfiction. Check out our Submission Guidelines here.

Teachers, we invite you to make our contest a regular part of your writing curriculum. Contact us at editor@writingforpeace.org for information on how to develop empathy through creative writing.

Grant Writer Opportunity

Writing for Peace is looking for a grant writer with experience with writing literary and youth advocacy grants. We are a 501c3 nonprofit. Please contact us at editor@writingforpeace.org.

 

Copyright © 2019 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

Recommended: NDN: the words of a little hawk, by Elaine Gerard

In keeping with our goal of developing empathy, compassion, and awareness through education and creative writing, Writing for Peace is encouraging expanded reading through our partnership with Poetic Justice Books. This is the first of our Advisers’ Recommended Readings, a review by Writing for Peace Adviser Robert Kostuck.

NDN: the words of a little hawk

by Elaine Gerard

reviewed by Robert Kostuck

 

Difficult subjects often make for strong and worthwhile poetry, and in NDN: the words of a little hawk, Elaine Gerard is never at a loss for subject matter. In “My Uncivil Heart,” she delineates the balance between her Native American heritage and the mainstream social expectations.

“. . . I see out of the corner
of slatted dark eyes,
the tattered edge of an arrow
and the shaggy heart
of the Indian beast
that wishes to rival
the best efforts of
your teacup world.”

Indeed, her heritage is the basis for her approach to all experience, strident and complex panegyrics which illuminate whatever touches her heart. Cultural awareness can be difficult when one is in the default position; beyond that position it becomes the root of everything. Social interaction, relationships with people or nature, sex, introspection, and healing fall within her scope. Her eye is unflinchingly honest, and a poem like “Desert Rain” is objective—as good writing must be—never falling into self-pity.

“a baby girl stirs in my belly
safe from this red shower
he stands over me with a fist,
I slipped and fell and now,
it’s pouring in my kitchen and
I don’t have a way out of the rain.”

This unflinching eye also acts as witness to the beauty of the natural world. As a member of the Blackfeet Indian Nation, Gerard lives her affinity for the landscape and sensory impressions of Montana. One can easily visualize this geography in the section titled Montana In My Blood, and “Sleepy Highway” perfectly illustrates this.

“This Montana day,
this long road
is lined with
thoughts of chickens,
truckloads of hay
and winter wheat
sleeping in brown dirt,
it smells like sage
and a thousand pieces
of my past . . . .”

The section titled “Letting Go” is a perfect example of objective soul searching, intensely personal evaluations, meditations on what it is to be human. The expression of self, composed for the self, offers the opportunity for reflection, consideration, and closure. Lines from “Remembering to Forget” concisely illustrate what a talented writer can do when given the opportunity for self-evaluation.

“I dig into my heart
to squeeze the feelings out,
in amazement at my life,
allow my soul to embrace
and maybe to love
the gentle pain of past losses,
to acknowledge my present life,
and all its goodness . . . .”

Part of the “Prologue” to this volume encapsulates what a reviewer can be at a loss to say. Would that others take a lesson from this highly recommended work, looking within themselves to discover who they really are.

“Life spits out a silent little girl who watches the world, a beleaguered teen into the mean streets and a married woman out the door of life as a divorcee. She is finding her way.”


Robert Kostuck is the guest editor for the February 2020 online issue of DoveTales. The theme is “Gardens in the Desert: Cultivating Awareness.” Broadly interpreted, this theme can encompass — Emotional, psychic, intellectual, physical, or social growth.

— The myriad ways we plant, nurture, harvest, or reap.

— Real or metaphorical gardens as destinations, refuges, nexus points of transformation, or starting points.

— Relationships real or imagined: the arid and/or seemingly empty places in interpersonal connections. The spaces in-between. Memory gaps, the gaps between intention and action, the passage of time forgotten. Empty pages, deleted hard drives, houses emptied of possessions, minds cleared of thoughts and desires.

— Bringing life to actual deserts, urban deserts, arctic deserts, lives that are deserts, relationships that are deserts, deserts of the past or future.

— Awareness = seeking, cultivating, residing in, exemplifying.

Submission window open through November 01, 2019. Submissions of poetry, fiction, non-fiction, interviews, art, and photography are all welcome.

 

Copyright © 2019 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

Become Your Own Writing Friend, A Writing Exercise By Victoria Hanley

When you are a friend to yourself, you can trust that friend with anything and everything. That friend is always there for you, no matter what you’re going through. To get started making friends with your inner writer, bring to mind something you’ve wanted to say but haven’t said. Maybe you’ve felt the need to spare someone’s feelings, or maybe the consequences of speaking would be too great and so you’ve decided to keep quiet, or maybe it’s another reason entirely. Whatever the reason, you’ve wanted to speak up, but you haven’t done so.

For this exercise, use a piece of paper and pencil or pen. Only use a computer if it has a shredder program. Write down exactly what you want to say. When you’ve finished, feed the piece of paper you’ve written on into a shredder machine or tear it up into tiny pieces. (If your computer has a shredder program, delete what you’ve written and then shred it.)

Why write and then get rid of what you’ve written? Because the inner writer can be quite shy and needs to feel safe. Sometimes that means creating a space where what you write is truly personal to you and there isn’t any chance of someone else reading it unless you want them to read it. Doing this exercise every day for a week will encourage your inner writer to come out and play.


Victoria Hanley, Writing for Peace AdviserVictoria Hanley spent years preparing for a writing career by holding as many contrasting jobs as possible, from baking bread to teaching anatomy and hosting radio shows.  Victoria’s novels have been published in 12 languages, won many honors and awards at home and abroad, and inspired two nonfiction writing books: Seize the Story: A Handbook for Teens Who Like to Write, and Wild Ink: Success Secrets to Writing and Publishing in the Young Adult Market. She teaches writing at Lighthouse Writers Workshop in Denver and at Northern Colorado Writers in Fort Collins. Learn more about Victoria’s books, read her blog, download a free chapter of Wild Ink, and watch Victoria in action at www.victoriahanley.com.


Writing for Peace News

September 17th, 2019

Online Youth Summit

Our Youth Summit has been postponed until Spring of 2020.

Young Writers Contest: One Grand Prize winner will be awarded $200

Our 2020 Young Writers Contest is officially open!  Writing for Peace challenges young writers (ages 13-19) to expand their empathy skills by researching an unfamiliar culture and writing from the point-of-view of a character within that new world, while exploring social, political, and environmental pressures, and universal themes. There is no fee for participation. Writers, ages 13-19, may submit in one of three categories – poetry, fiction, or nonfiction. Check out our Submission Guidelines here.

Teachers, we invite you to make our contest a regular part of your writing curriculum. Contact us at editor@writingforpeace.org for information on how to develop empathy through creative writing.

Now Reading for February Issue of DoveTales Online

The reading period for our next DoveTales Online, Guest Edited by Writing for Peace Adviser, Robert Kostuck is now open. He has themed our February issue, “Gardens in the Desert: Cultivating Awareness.” Check submission guidelines for details.

DoveTales Online

Check out Summer Edition of DoveTales at DoveTales Online, One World, One People. Find work from our panel of advisers, emerging, and award-winning writers and artists, as well as the winning stories, poems and essays from our 2019 Young Writers Contest.

Grant Writer Opportunity

Writing for Peace is looking for a grant writer with experience with writing literary and youth advocacy grants. We are a 501c3 nonprofit. Please contact us at editor@writingforpeace.org.

Writing for Peace Adviser Events

Christ Church Poetry Series

 Hosted by Writing for Peace Adviser Djelloul Marbrook

The second reading in this series, in honor of the late poet John Ashbery, features poets Gretchen Primack, Karen Schoemer and Vladimir Nahitchevansky. It is held in conjunction with the church’s highly regarded periodic book sales. A preview of the book sale and reception is scheduled for 6 p.m. The poetry reading, hosted by Djelloul Marbrook, is at 7 p.m. Christ Church, 431 Union St, Hudson, NY 12534-2426, United States.

 

Copyright © 2019 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

 

Writing for Peace News

September 4th, 2019

Young Writers Contest Open

One Grand Prize winner will be awarded $200.

Our 2020 Young Writers Contest is officially open!  Writing for Peace challenges young writers (ages 13-19) to expand their empathy skills by researching an unfamiliar culture and writing from the point-of-view of a character within that new world, while exploring social, political, and environmental pressures, and universal themes. There is no fee for participation. Writers, ages 13-19, may submit in one of three categories – poetry, fiction, or nonfiction.

Teachers, we invite you to make our contest a regular part of your writing curriculum. Contact us at editor@writingforpeace.org for information on how to develop empathy through creative writing.

DoveTales Online

DoveTales Online, One World, One People went live on August 1st. Find work from our panel of advisers, emerging, and award-winning writers and artists, as well as the winning stories, poems and essays from our 2019 Young Writers Contest. Stats confirm we’re reaching a much broader audience online. We’re also sharing DoveTales pieces on our Facebook page, so keep and eye out for them!

Poetry       Fiction       Nonfiction       Art & Photography       Young Writers    About DoveTales      Submissions    

Now Reading for February Issue of DoveTales Online

 

The reading period for our next DoveTales Online, Guest Edited by Writing for Peace Adviser, Robert Kostuck is now open. He has themed our February issue, “Gardens in the Desert: Cultivating Awareness.”

In a world where mass shootings have become commonplace, where  politicians and their supporters revel in violent and divisive rhetoric, where television sets and the internet spew hate-filled propaganda, awareness can seem like an oasis in the desert. How will we cultivate gardens of empathy, compassion, and common sense in these barren deserts?

2019 Online Youth Summit Deadline Approaching

Accepting work until September 15th for our Youth Summit here.

Theme: Day By Day, Hand in Hand: Seeing & Creating Peace in Daily Action

This year’s summit will focus on the power of individual, community,  and grassroots activism, exploring what we as individuals can do in our day to day lives to work toward the peace we all desire and deserve.

Join young artists, writers, and activists from around the world in conversation about the matters you care about in this online gathering. Our keynotes, young people making significant change in the world, and submitted creative work from participants, invite open and caring conversations about peace and activism in our troubled times.

Now accepting applications to our Panel of Advisers

Among our panel members are poets, novelists, memoirists, and essayists – artists who have achieved a level of personal integrity in their work that inspires each of us to search for our own truth. Some panel members inspire us through their life choices, perhaps recognizing a calling toward peace after they were already well established in other careers. They show us that it is never too late to find personal fulfillment in working toward a greater good.

Advisers will be asked to contribute periodically to our blog and DoveTales Online Journal, and help with the local promotion of Writing for Peace events, publications, and readings.

Please send resumes and letters of intent to editor@writingforpeace.org.


Keep the faith and keep on writing!


Copyright © 2019 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

When Silence is Not An Option, by Carmel Mawle

“We must finally stop appealing to theology to justify our reserved silence about what the state is doing — for that is nothing but fear. ‘Open your mouth for the one who is voiceless’ — for who in the church today still remembers that that is the least of the Bible’s demands in times such as these?”

~Dietrich Bonhoeffer

Deitrich Bonhoeffer (1906-1945), the German author of The Cost of Discipleship and founder of the Confessing Church, attended seminary in New York, where he developed a friendship with Frank Fisher, a black fellow-seminarian from Harlem’s Abyssinian Baptist Church, and was moved and inspired by the Gospel of Social Justice.

As his own Christian conviction was deepened, Bonhoeffer made the decision to return to a Germany increasingly under the sway of Nazism, leaving behind his friends, fiancé and safety, becoming one of its most vocal resisters.

“I have come to the conclusion that I made a mistake in coming to America. I must live through this difficult period in our national history with the people of Germany. I will have no right to participate in the reconstruction of Christian life in Germany after the war if I do not share the trials of this time with my people … Christians in Germany will have to face the terrible alternative of either willing the defeat of their nation in order that Christian civilization may survive or willing the victory of their nation and thereby destroying civilization. I know which of these alternatives I must choose but I cannot make that choice from security.”

He was imprisoned for nearly two years, and ultimately was accused of playing a role in a plot to murder Hitler and hanged. Despite the danger of dissent, Bonhoeffer never hesitated to speak truth to power.

If there is one thing we have seen in the current alignment of power, nationalism, and greed  gaining ground all over this beautiful wounded planet, it is that no theology (or lack thereof) has cornered the market in hypocrisy. There seem to be factions of every faith and philosophy that can find justification within their man-made tenets for cruelty to the voiceless, the powerless.

Here in the United States, there are Christians who cling to isolated stories of persecution in the Middle East, or at home where secularists might have the gall to wish them “Happy Holidays” instead of “Merry Christmas”. They revel in examples of persecution by radical Islamists, ignoring the persecution of Muslims in China, India, Myanmar, Israel, the United States and elsewhere. They choose to focus on the insignificant, rather than see their own hypocrisy in supporting an Administration that treats immigrants and refugees (most of them professed Christians, themselves) inhumanely, even rationalizing the separation of young children from their parents, causing irreparable trauma and harm to their developing psyches.

It’s in this brutal reality, that my grandchildren return to school and autumn colors blend into our mountain palette, and it’s got me thinking about the coming winter edition of DoveTales. Adviser and Guest Editor, Robert Kostuck, has chosen the insightful theme, “Gardens in the Desert: Cultivating Awareness.” What are we, dear Writers of Peace, if not gardeners in the desert?

If Bonhoeffer, in the midst of a nation frothing for death and destruction, could plant seeds of courage and resistance in enough hearts to become a threat to Der Führer – a testament to the power of conviction and words – then what can thousands of us with that same conviction accomplish?

We will create gardens in the desert of social injustice with our words and actions. We will not stand idly by as children are deprived of hope and safety and life. We will not remain silent as our planet is ravaged and the Amazon disappears into flames. This globe is our garden. The refugees and prisoners across its surface are our family. Yours and mine. Silence is not an option.

The reading period for our Winter Edition is open until November 1st. As writers, we cultivate awareness through our words, stanzas and sentences.  Send us your work and together we’ll spread the seeds of social justice and peaceful activism where there is fertile soil and where there is not.

Carmel Mawle is founder of the nonprofit literary organization, Writing for Peace, and has served as Editor-in-Chief of DoveTales, An International Journal of the Arts since 2013. A Pushcart Nominee, her short stories, essays and poetry have been published in literary journals and anthologies, including Smokelong Quarterly and Shake the Tree Anthology.

 


2019 Writing for Peace Online Youth Summit

Now accepting submissions for the Youth Summit here.

Theme: Day By Day, Hand in Hand: Seeing & Creating Peace in Daily Action


Check out DoveTales Online Now ~


Copyright © 2019 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

 

 

Writing for Peace News, August 5th, 2019

Writing for Peace News

DoveTales Online

DoveTales Online, One World, One People went live on August 1st. Find work from our panel of advisers, emerging, and award-winning writers and artists, as well as the winning stories, poems and essays from our 2019 Young Writers Contest. Stats confirm we’re reaching a much broader audience online. We’re also sharing DoveTales pieces on our Facebook page, so keep and eye out for them!

Now Reading for February Issue of DoveTales Online

The reading period for our next DoveTales Online, Guest Edited by Writing for Peace Adviser, Robert Kostuck is now open. He has themed our February issue, “Gardens in the Desert: Cultivating Awareness.”

In a world where mass shootings have become commonplace, where  politicians and their supporters revel in violent and divisive rhetoric, where television sets and the internet spew hate-filled propaganda, awareness can seem like an oasis in the desert. How will we cultivate gardens of empathy, compassion, and common sense in these barren deserts?

2019 Writing for Peace Online Youth Summit

Now accepting submissions for the Youth Summit here.

Theme: Day By Day, Hand in Hand: Seeing & Creating Peace in Daily Action

This year’s summit will focus on the power of individual, community,  and grassroots activism, exploring what we as individuals can do in our day to day lives to work toward the peace we all desire and deserve.

Join young artists, writers, and activists from around the world in conversation about the matters you care about in this online gathering. Our keynotes, young people making significant change in the world, and submitted creative work from participants, invite open and caring conversations about peace and activism in our troubled times.

Young Writers Contest

Our 2020 Young Writers Contest will begin accepting entries on September 1st. We invite teachers to make our contest a part of your regular writing curriculum. Contact us at editor@writingforpeace.org.

Now accepting applications to our Panel of Advisers

Among our panel members are poets, novelists, memoirists, and essayists – artists who have achieved a level of personal integrity in their work that inspires each of us to search for our own truth. Some panel members inspire us through their life choices, perhaps recognizing a calling toward peace after they were already well established in other careers. They show us that it is never too late to find personal fulfillment in working toward a greater good.

Advisers will be asked to contribute periodically to our blog and DoveTales Online Journal, and help with the local promotion of Writing for Peace events, publications, and readings.

Please send resumes and letters of intent to editor@writingforpeace.org.


Keep the faith and keep on writing!

Poetry       Fiction       Nonfiction       Art & Photography       Young Writers    About DoveTales      Submissions    

Copyright © 2019 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

DoveTales Online, Issue 1 – August 2019

Our first issue of DoveTales Online is up!

DoveTales, a publication of Writing for PeaceSince 2013, Writing for Peace has invited writers and artists from all over the globe to explore themes within the context of current events. Their responsespoetry, fiction, nonfiction, art and photographytell us something about the nature of humanity. We learn from each other. We share our joys and grief, empathy and compassion, the wisdom of years and youth, and the dream of a world that is healthy and diverse, with equality and justice for every sentient beingwhether or not they can afford political lobbyists. This philosophy resulted in a collection of beautiful print booksOccupied, Contrast, Nature, Family and Cultural Identity, Refugees and the Displaced, and Empathy in Art: Embracing the Otherthat educate, inspire, and challenge us.

We continue this tradition with our new online journal, celebrating the community we have built together, and supporting each other in our efforts to leave this world a better place for future generations—and being online, we can do it with more color, audio and videos!

In this, our first issue of DoveTales Online, you’ll find our 2019 Young Writers Contest Winners, as well as poetry, prose, and visual art that delves into our Guest Editor, Patricia Jabbeh Wesley’s theme: “One World, One People.” If this theme seems incongruous with our daily news, make a cup of tea, get comfortable, and find out what her thought process was in choosing it. Thank you for joining us in the debut of DoveTales, An International Online Journal of the Arts!

Check out DoveTales Online Now ~

 

Copyright © 2019 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

Good things are coming!

Good morning, peace writers!

Hoping you’re all feeling energized by the latest news and not despairing. Good things are happening. Light is shining in dark places. Hidden evils are being revealed. Remember, when horrible news surfaces—over 900 children separated from their parents since this disastrous policy was “ended,” mass shootings becoming commonplace, climate change speeding up and scientists silenced, to name a few—it is because writers and activists are refusing to let them fester in the dark. Hard truths gain power when they are kept secrets, so let’s celebrate the knowing and keep on pushing forward. We’re in this together.

We’re working hard here at Writing for Peace. If you’re reading this on the website, you may have already seen some changes there. The site is looking pretty slicknew event calendar, streamlined format, and mobile responsive. It should be much easier to navigate on any device. All this in preparation for the launch of our beautiful new online DoveTales!

Tomorrow is the big day. DoveTales, An International Journal of the Arts is going online! I’m seeing it take shape here, and it’s absolutely gorgeous. Guest editor Patricia Jabbeh Wesley’s theme, “One World, One People,” has resonated with writers and artists across the globe. You’ll find hard truth, hope, love and laughter in its illuminated pages. And you won’t want to miss our young writers’ beautiful winning poems, essays and stories.

So keep the faith and watch for our new DoveTales tomorrow. We’ll be working right up until it launches, so send a good thought our way.

Wishing you peace and strength,

Carmel

Carmel Mawle is founder of the nonprofit literary organization, Writing for Peace, and has served as Editor-in-Chief of DoveTales, An International Journal of the Arts since 2013. A Pushcart Nominee, her short stories, essays and poetry have been published in literary journals and anthologies, including Smokelong Quarterly and Shake the Tree Anthology.

Copyright © 2019 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.