Phillip Richards Reads Sunday, Patricia Jabbeh Wesley Breaking the Silence

Patricia Jabbeh Wesley Discusses Breaking The Silence

Yesterday, longtime WfP Adviser, Patricia Jabbeh Wesley, delivered a wonderful presentation on Breaking the Silence, her anthology of Liberian Literature. As a part of that epic project, she developed the Liberian Young Scholars program.  We saw powerful work from several of these emerging writers, young men and women, in our August 2019 DoveTales, One World, One People, Guest edited by Dr. Wesley. In the presentation, she talks about the challenges of teaching long-distance due to the Covid-19 pandemic, as well as how she encourages young women to write boldly in a patriarchal society and young men to be more aware of the potential for harm in their words. Congratulations to Patricia Jabbeh Wesley on her presentation and the ongoing project of Breaking the Silence. You can watch the presentation in full here.

Coming: Sunday Live Reading with Phillip Richards

We’re excited that Phillip Richards will join Host Brad Wetzler Sunday, November 1st, at 6pm MDT to read from his published and unpublished works. Phillip Richards is a Professor Emeritus at Colgate University where he taught American and Afro-American Literature, as well as a literary journalist, scholar, and critic. His memoir, An Integrated Boyhood: Coming of Age in White Cleveland, tells the story of growing up black in America during the 1950s and 1960s. Black Heart: The Moral Life of Recent African American Letters is a history of black literary criticism.  He writes frequently about contemporary African American cultural issues and poetry.  His writing has appeared in Harper’sThe American ScholarThe Chronicle of Higher EducationCallaloo, the Journal of African American History, and Dissent. He is an Associate Editor of DoveTales, A Literary Journal of the Arts.

Meeting ID: 828 9897 7722

If you missed last Sunday’s Live Reading when author David Gilbreath Barton read from his new book Havel: Unfinished Revolution, you can watch the recording here. David Gilbreath Barton is a Jungian psychotherapist, with 25 years of experience in working with dreams, myths, and the collective unconscious. He’s an Associate Professor of Humanities at Northern New Mexico College and the founder of The Salt Journal and the Salt Institute.


Resistance is Now Available

Purchase Resistance: DoveTales Summer 2020, Issue III

Book Description:
This 8.5 x 11 full color book is Guest Edited by Brad Wetzler and features poet Martín Espada. With 380 pages of poetry, fiction, nonfiction, art and photography by contributors from all over the globe, including our 2020 Young Writers Contest Winners, Resistance is a powerful statement of our First Amendment Rights.

Page count: 380   Cost: $24.95


Copyright © 2020 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

David Gilbreath Barton Reads Sunday, Resistance Now Available

Join Host Brad Wetzler this Sunday, October 25th, to hear author David Gilbreath Barton read from his new book Havel: Unfinished Revolution. A biography of Vaclav Havel, the Czech statesman, writer, and former political dissident, Havel served as the last President of Czechoslovakia from 1989 until the dissolution of Czechoslovakia in 1992 and then as the first President of the Czech Republic from 1993 to 2003.

David Gilbreath Barton is a Jungian psychotherapist, with 25 years of experience in working with dreams, myths, and the collective unconscious. He’s an Associate Professor of Humanities at Northern New Mexico College and the founder of The Salt Journal and the Salt Institute.

Meeting ID: 828 9897 7722
Mark Your Calendars for Next Sunday with Phil Richards!

Phillip Richards will join us on November 1st at 6pm MDT to read from his published and unpublished works. Phil Richards is a Professor Emeritus at Colgate University where he taught American and Afro-American Literature, as well as a literary journalist, scholar, and critic. His memoir, An Integrated Boyhood: Coming of Age in White Cleveland, tells the story of growing up black in America during the 1950s and 1960s. Black Heart: The Moral Life of Recent African American Letters is a history of black literary criticism.  He writes frequently about contemporary African American cultural issues and poetry.  His writing has appeared in Harper’sThe American ScholarThe Chronicle of Higher EducationCallaloo, the Journal of African American History, and Dissent. He is an Associate Editor of DoveTales, A Literary Journal of the Arts.


Resistance is Now Available

Purchase Resistance: DoveTales Summer 2020, Issue III

Book Description:
This 8.5 x 11 full color book is Guest Edited by Brad Wetzler and features poet Martín Espada. With 380 pages of poetry, fiction, nonfiction, art and photography by contributors from all over the globe, including our 2020 Young Writers Contest Winners, Resistance is a powerful statement of our First Amendment Rights.

Page count: 380   Cost: $24.95


Copyright © 2020 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

Live Reading Moves to Sundays with Brad Wetzler

Beginning, Sunday, October 18th, the Writing for Peace Live Reading Series (held previously every other Friday) moves to every Sunday at 8pm ET with host Brad Wetzler.  Author, journalist, and teacher Brad Wetzler has served as Guest Editor of the Resistance edition of DoveTales and as co-host of our Friday Live Readings. His vision takes our reading series to exciting new heights.

Says Brad, “My hope is to continue the Writing for Peace tradition of having strong representation by black writers, people of color, LGTBQ+, international writers, etc. Since we are living in challenging times both politically and personally, I hope to devote time to the issues of artists’ responsibilities to use their voices, as well as issues around writing process, and, of course, matters of using our art and voices to promote inner and world peace. I also hope to occasionally invite important voices from the spiritual community to discuss how we maintain inner peace and serve our fellow humans.”

His first show, on Sunday, October 18th, will feature author BK Loren to read both new and familiar work and discuss her views on a writer’s social responsibility and the path of the writer during difficult times. BK Loren is the author of Theft: A Novel and Animal, Mineral, Radical: Essays on Wildlife, Family, and Food.

Meeting ID: 828 9897 7722

On Sunday, October 25th, author David Gilbreath Barton will join us to read from his new book Havel: Unfinished Revolution, a biography of Vaclav Havel, Czech statesman, writer, and former political dissident, who served as the last President of Czechoslovakia from 1989 until the dissolution of Czechoslovakia in 1992 and then as the first President of the Czech Republic from 1993 to 2003. David Gilbreath Barton is a Jungian psychotherapist, with 25 years of experience in working with dreams, myths, and the collective unconscious. He’s an Associate Professor of Humanities at Northern New Mexico College and the founder of The Salt Journal and the Salt Institute.

Meeting ID: 828 9897 7722

So, beginning October 18th, be sure to set aside an hour in your Sunday evenings to be enlightened and inspired with Brad Wetzler and his guests.

If you missed any of our readers, you can watch them in full here.


An Important Message from W4P President, Carmel Mawle

I would never presume to tell you how to vote. That said, November is sneaking up on us (like a Mack Truck), so this is a friendly reminder to make a plan now to get your votes in as early as possible. As writers, ink on a page is the beginning of endless possibilities. The same may be true of inking in the little blank boxes on your ballots. If you need help getting to the polls or mailing your ballots, there is help available. If you go to the polls in person, wear your masks and stay safe. Whatever happens after this election, we will still need your voice. Thanks for all you do.


Copyright © 2020 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

Resistance Released & Dinty W. Moore Reads Friday Live

Resistance is now available in print!

This 8.5 x 11 full color book is Guest Edited by Brad Wetzler and features poet Martín Espada. With 380 pages of poetry, fiction, nonfiction, art and photography by contributors from all over the globe, including our 2020 Young Writers Contest Winners, Resistance is a powerful statement of our First Amendment Rights.

Purchase Resistance Now


Dinty W. Moore Joins Friday Live, Sept 18th at 8pm ET

On September 18th, at 8pm ET, award Winning Author Dinty W. Moore will join us to read from his book The Mindful Writer and discuss parallels between mindfulness training and the path of an artist.

Dinty W. Moore is author of the award-winning memoir Between Panic & Desire, the writing guides The Story Cure and Crafting the Personal Essay, and two books centered on his spiritual journey, The Accidental Buddhist and The Mindful Writer. He has published essays and stories in The Georgia Review, Harper’s, The New York Times Magazine, The Southern Review, and elsewhere. He is founding editor of Brevity, the journal of flash nonfiction, and teaches master classes and workshops across the United States as well as in Ireland, Scotland, Spain, Switzerland, and Mexico. More information can be found at www.dintywmoore.com.

Join Friday Live Zoom
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82848651312?pwd=WDMyamFSTko5ME1lRy94Rm11eGxlUT09
Meeting ID: 828 4865 1312     Passcode: 870607


Watch R.L. Maizes Reading

Photo Credit Adrianne Mathiowetz

If you missed our August 21st Friday Live with author R.L. Maizes, you can watch the watch her reading here.

R.L. Maizes is the author of the novel OTHER PEOPLE’S PETS (Celadon Books, Macmillan) and the short story collection WE LOVE ANDERSON COOPER (Celadon Books). Her stories have aired on National Public Radio and have appeared in Electric Literature’s Recommended Reading. Her essays have been published in The New York Times, The Washington Post, and have aired on NPR.

Maizes was born and raised in Queens, New York, and lives in Boulder County, CO, with her husband, Steve, and her muses: Arie, a cat who was dropped in the animal shelter’s night box like an overdue library book, and Rosie, a dog who spent her first year homeless in South Dakota and thinks Colorado is downright balmy.


Copyright © 2020 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

Resistance Coming Soon, James Scott Smith Reading, and Robert Kostuck Reviews Water, Rocks and Trees

Resistance Available Soon!

After some technical difficulties and delays, the print edition of Resistance is nearly finished and will be available for purchase this coming weekend, September 12th. (Post has been updated to reflect changed date.) Thank you for your patience!


Friday Live with James Scott Smith

This Friday, September 4th, at 8pm ET, James Scott Smith will read from his books, The Expanse of All Things and Water, Rocks and Trees, published by Homebound Publications.You can find the Friday Live Zoom link at the end of this post.

James Scott Smith lives on a creek on the front range of the Colorado Rockies. Working at home for the last 15 years, James is co-founder of Tava Creative Studios. He reads and writes when he isn’t capturing images or fishing the waters of hidden canyons. His award winning collections of poetry include Water, Rocks and Trees and, The Expanse of All Things, published by Homebound Publications. Check out his website here.

Robert Kostuck’s Review of Water, Rocks and Trees, by James Scott Smith

Is it the passing of time? Or is it the realization that time has passed? We reach a certain age and glibly speak of the ‘downslope’ or the ‘other side of fifty’, assured momentarily that those who went before always left something behind. And then we realize we are living our own ‘leave behind’ moments. This is the mature poet’s self-administered task—to elucidate clearly those moments that of insight. The day-to-day, the commonplace, the ordinary, the seemingly repetitive motions and words. James Scott Smith teaches us to dig down, sit or stand still, and allow those moments to supersede everything else.

The wildflowers
are striving into October as
sunlight still conspires with the
soil, with the
hidden in dark places. (“Wildflowers” 1-5)

Standing ’mongst the dogs all
squint of eye and crane of neck until I named the
circling turkey buzzard speck of cumulus nimbus.
Such scavengers bring me pause. (“Sky Burial” 1-4)

The ease and excellent use of alliteration and rhyme throughout these poems highlights how they are meant to be read aloud. There is the hint of a melody, reminiscent of singing and songs, for after all poetry preceded writing and words were sung before they were written. Nothing worse than a lifeless poem reduced to mere ink and paper – or an electronic file; fortunately this work lifts from the page and takes life just where the pen or keyboard stops.

To the one who remembers Pangaea
to the soul dredged deep of a
land before God broke bread of it with
mighty works of root and cause to christen
the continents cast across the waters; be strong. (“Old Soul” 1-5)

Three black crows on
blue borne sky.
One with crust of
bread in beak.
Two with crust of
bread in eye.
I to hear the
matter speak. (“Crows” 1-8)

In last light
I walked to the creek
to throw a line and
breathe easy. I have
fished from tundra to
tidewater. I have stood
by still waters since
my first years. (“In Last Light” 1-8)

Also an accomplished nature photographer, James Scott Smith incorporates what he sees into his writing. These poems are about observing, interpreting, and translating the reality of the natural world. These are the magic tricks—simplifying a complex ecosystem into an intense gaze, and making the moment mean everything. That moment is like the hottest molecule at the heart of a star, unique and singular, yet surrounded by literally everything that makes it what it is.

Taken
for weed, it is scab on
wound. It binds, holds,
seeds, dies, feeds. Rising
against the blight of
propriety, joining the
ways of the killdeer (. . . .) (“Alfalfa” 4-11)

It is morning
and the fitful dreams are rinsing out into the
one reality within the seen things. (“Tenalach” 11-13)

Good writing comes from the inner imagination, worldly experience, or a combination of both. James Scott Smith reaches that sweet spot by attending to the outer world which will go on without us. The cycle of the seasons, the ballet of birth, life, and death—every moment unique, and spellbinding for those who can see clearly and return to tell the tale.


Robert Kostuck is an M.Ed. graduate from Northern Arizona University. Recently published fiction, essays, and reviews appear or are forthcoming in the anthologies Everywhere Stories, Vols. II and III, Manifest West, Vol. VI, and DoveTales Vols. IV—VII; and many print and online journals including Kenyon Review, The Massachusetts Review, The Southwest Review, Louisiana Literature, Free State Review, Zone 3, Saint Ann’s Review, Bryant Literary Review, Concho River Review, Flyway: A Literary Review, Clackamas Literary Review, Silk Road, Fifth Wednesday Journal, Crab Creek Review, Takahē Magazine, Roanoke Review, EVENT, and Tiferet. He is currently working on short stories, essays, and novels. He lives near an ocean; his heart belongs to the Chihuahua and Sonora deserts, and certain parts of Nova Scotia.

Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82475509386?pwd=NkgxaGxXeWVTNmZQUkZjN090TEJuUT09

Meeting ID: 824 7550 9386
Passcode: 689879


Copyright © 2020 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

R.L. Maizes Joins Friday Live Reading

Photo Credit Adrianne Mathiowetz

This Friday, August 21st, at 8pm ET, R.L. Maizes will join Writing for Peace via Zoom to read from her highly acclaimed debut novel, Other People’s Pets, and discuss the development of empathy through creative writing. One of the particular gifts R.L. Maizes brings to her writing, also evident in her earlier short story collection, We Love Anderson Cooper, is the ability to draw the reader deep into the psyches of her characters. We are not only present with her characters as they react to the world around them, but we understand the forces and events that have shaped their lives up to that point. With that understanding, even the most shocking choices evoke empathy and compassion. Join R.L. Maizes this Friday in our Friday Live Reading Series.

About R.L. Maizes

R.L. Maizes is the author of the novel OTHER PEOPLE’S PETS (Celadon Books, Macmillan) and the short story collection WE LOVE ANDERSON COOPER (Celadon Books). Her stories have aired on National Public Radio and have appeared in Electric Literature’s Recommended Reading. Her essays have been published in The New York Times, The Washington Post, and have aired on NPR.

Maizes was born and raised in Queens, New York, and lives in Boulder County, CO, with her husband, Steve, and her muses: Arie, a cat who was dropped in the animal shelter’s night box like an overdue library book, and Rosie, a dog who spent her first year homeless in South Dakota and thinks Colorado is downright balmy. 

Meeting ID: 834 0976 7580
Password: 381108

Join Zoom Reading: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83409767580?pwd=amJwUXA2c3pEMHZ4UWJCdUhOTUZIQT09


Copyright © 2020 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

Two Poems by Peter Balakian for Tonight’s Special Reading

Friday Live Reading with Peter Balakian

Pulitzer Prize Winner Peter Balakian will join us tonight, August 7th, at 8pm Eastern Time, to read from his work and discuss poetry of witness. He asked us to share the poems below so we’ll have a chance to read them in advance of his discussion. “Eggplant” was previously published on May 28, 2018 in The New Yorker. “History, Bitterness” was previously published in Green Mountain Review 30.2. You’ll find the Friday Live Meeting Zoom connection information following Peter Balakian’s brief biography at the bottom of this post. Please help us spread the word and join us tonight for this very special Friday Live Reading.

 
 
EGGPLANT
I loved the white moon circles
and the purple halos,
on a plate as the salt sweat them.
The oil in the pan smoked like bad
days in the Syrian desert—
when a moon stayed all day—
when morning was a purple
elegy for the last friend seen—
when the fog of the riverbank
rose like a holy ghost.
My mother made those white moons sizzle
in some egg wash and salt—
some parsley appeared
from the garden
and summer evenings
came with no memory
but the table with white dishes.
Shining aubergine—black-skinned
beauty, bitter apple.
We used our hands.
—Peter Balakian, New Yorker, May 28, 2018

 
 
HISTORY, BITTERNESS

A phone booth August/ Yaddo/ Saratoga Springs–air
of the Tiffany parlor– sour scent of empty wine bottles,
my friend handed me the sweating receiver: “go ahead—say hello.”
What could I say to James Baldwin who was dying in the south of France.
No name in the street. Paris. Algiers. Little Rock, you can fill it in. . . .
I’m sitting at Café Deux Magots with my NY Yankees umbrella in my lap,
a wide glass of wine from some vineyard of Burgundy in my hand,
recalling that Baldwin sat at Deux Magots drinking scotch all-day and writing
as friends dropped by. And it hits me: just over Pont de Sully my great uncle
sat in a big treaty room of 1919 representing Armenia (did it exist?) in a fancy
hotel with others who hoped for a nation in return for the slaughter.
Baldwin knew Sartre and de Beauvoir, he saw Camus pass by.
It was 1958 and the Algerian cabby who dropped him off drunk
on the curb was half blind from the revolution.
Bang bang bang goes the heart. Mr. Baldwin was dying in a sensual village
in the south of France. After a week at Versailles my uncle came to that hotel room
where in the closet of his head a big white sheet floated over the Black Sea.
What did rape and massacre mean? Fail proof, shattered, bitten off
words that floated over the bridge into the carnival horns of night.
A few months earlier Miles Davis passed Baldwin at Deux Magots
on his way to play for Louie Malle’s Ensensure pour L’escefau—
the spurting air of love love love slipping from the valves —
the spit and breath of night in Paris off the torpid brown
Seine where Paul Celan had disappeared not long before.
Hiss hiss hiss goes the heart. It’s 1958 and Camus still walks
the boulevard–the war in Algeria is daily acid in the river—
What are degrees of separation? Private myths? Illusions?
My aunt the surrealist might call them chance meetings.
Do we invent proximities for our need, for salvation, for love?
Wilson, Clemenceau, Lloyd George names my uncle scrawled
on a map of the dispossessed—on a wall in a hotel of cards
where Dixieland horns played at a banquet for the grand Armée
and the next map of Europe was shuffled with an ace in the hole.
Miles Davis spent 7 hours with Louis Malle making some
languid, piercing, hollow sliding sounds in the indeterminate dank night,
no name on the street stalked him. A few years later Baldwin moved just miles
from where my father was born in Istanbul–a few years after the Armenians
were expunged from Turkey and my grandparents left the ghost map
on the wall. It was 1919 and the flu blew along Saint-Germain where
my grandparents met my uncle that Fall. I knew Baldwin’s heart went hollow,
languid, and sizzled with the need to get out of America; it even led him to
the place my grandparents fled—before they landed a couple miles from Baldwin’s
apartment in Harlem.
Are these degrees of separation? or just my way of thinking about that strange
moment in a phone booth at an artists’ colony in the summer of ’86?
My friend said: “if you love Jimmy’s work, I know he’d love to hear
from you. All good news means a lot especially at the end.”
What could I say to Mr. Baldwin? He’d helped me understand the bitter
history that had trapped me—that was trapped in me.
Istanbul, New York, Paris. No name. No street.
I was sweating into the phone. Mr. Baldwin’s voice was frail but unmistakable.

—Peter Balakian, Green Mountain Review 30.2
 
 

About Peter Balakian

Peter Balakian is the author of seven books of poems most recently Ozone Journal, which won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry, as well as Ziggurat (2010) and June-tree: New and Selected Poems, 1974-2000 (2001). His four books of prose include The Burning Tigris: The Armenian Genocide and America’s Response (2004), won the 2005 Raphael Lemkin Prize and was a New York Times Notable Book and a New York Times Best Seller. His memoir, Black Dog of Fate won the 1998 PEN/Martha Albrand Prize for the Art of the Memoir, and was a best book of the year for the New York Times, the LA Times, and Publisher’s Weekly, and was recently issued in a 10th anniversary edition. He is co-translator of  Girgoris Balakian’s Armenian Golgotha: A Memoir of the Armenian Genocide 1915-1918, (Knopf, 2009), which was a Washington Post book of the year.

He is also the author of a book on the American poet Theodore Roethke and the co translator of the Armenian poet Siamanto’s Bloody News From My Friend. Between 1976-1996 he edited with Bruce Smith the poetry journal Graham House Review.  His prose and essays have appeared in the New York Times Magazine, The Chronicle of Higher Education, Salon, The Daily Beast, Tikkun, The Guardian, LA Times, Art In America, and others.

He is the recipient of many awards and prizes including the Presidential Medal and the Moves Khoranatsi Medal from the Republic of Armenia,  The Spendlove Prize for Social Justice, Tolerance, and Diplomacy (recipients include President Carter), a Guggenheim Fellowship, a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, the Emily Clark Balch Prize for poetry from the Virginia Quarterly Review. He has appeared widely on national television and radio( 60 Minutes, ABC World News Tonight, PBS, Charlie Rose, Fresh Air, etc) , and his work have appeared in a many languages including  Armenian, Bulgarian, French, Dutch, Greek, German, Hebrew, Russian, and Turkish. He is Donald M. and Constance H. Rebar Professor of the Humanities, Professor of English and Director of Creative Writing at Colgate University.

Join Zoom Reading:

Meeting ID: 854 6459 8638 Password: 510847  https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85464598638?pwd=eTlBd1RTYllabUNYTlVwSGdGWU1ndz09


Copyright © 2020 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

Pulitzer Prize Winner Peter Balakian Joins Friday Live Reading

Friday Live Reading Series Welcomes Peter Balakian

This Friday, August 7th, at 8pm ET, Pulitzer Prize winner Peter Balakian will read from his work and discuss poetry of witness.

About Peter Balakian

Peter Balakian is the author of seven books of poems most recently Ozone Journal, which won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry, as well as Ziggurat (2010) and June-tree: New and Selected Poems, 1974-2000 (2001). His four books of prose include The Burning Tigris: The Armenian Genocide and America’s Response (2004), won the 2005 Raphael Lemkin Prize and was a New York Times Notable Book and a New York Times Best Seller. His memoir, Black Dog of Fate won the 1998 PEN/Martha Albrand Prize for the Art of the Memoir, and was a best book of the year for the New York Times, the LA Times, and Publisher’s Weekly, and was recently issued in a 10th anniversary edition. He is co-translator of  Girgoris Balakian’s Armenian Golgotha: A Memoir of the Armenian Genocide 1915-1918, (Knopf, 2009), which was a Washington Post book of the year.

He is also the author of a book on the American poet Theodore Roethke and the co translator of the Armenian poet Siamanto’s Bloody News From My Friend. Between 1976-1996 he edited with Bruce Smith the poetry journal Graham House Review.  His prose and essays have appeared in the New York Times Magazine, The Chronicle of Higher Education, Salon, The Daily Beast, Tikkun, The Guardian, LA Times, Art In America, and others.

He is the recipient of many awards and prizes including the Presidential Medal and the Moves Khoranatsi Medal from the Republic of Armenia,  The Spendlove Prize for Social Justice, Tolerance, and Diplomacy (recipients include President Carter), a Guggenheim Fellowship, a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, the Emily Clark Balch Prize for poetry from the Virginia Quarterly Review. He has appeared widely on national television and radio( 60 Minutes, ABC World News Tonight, PBS, Charlie Rose, Fresh Air, etc) , and his work have appeared in a many languages including  Armenian, Bulgarian, French, Dutch, Greek, German, Hebrew, Russian, and Turkish. He is Donald M. and Constance H. Rebar Professor of the Humanities, Professor of English and Director of Creative Writing at Colgate University.

Join Zoom Reading:

Meeting ID: 854 6459 8638 Password: 510847  https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85464598638?pwd=eTlBd1RTYllabUNYTlVwSGdGWU1ndz09


R.L. Maizes, Photo Credit Adrianne Mathiowetz

Upcoming Friday Live Readers…

Our next Friday Live Reading will be on August 21st with R.L. Maizes, author of the short story collection We Love Anderson Cooper and the novel Other People’s Pets, published by Celadon Books.

September 4th: Award Winning Poet and naturalist James Scott Smith reads from his book, The Expanse of All Things.

September 18th: Award Winning Author Dinty W. Moore will read from his book The Mindful Writer and discuss parallels between mindfulness training and the path of an artist.

Find more information on our Friday Live Readings here.


DoveTales Resistance, Guest Edited by Brad Wetzler, is Online

Be sure to check out our latest online journal, Resistance, Guest Edited by Brad Wetzler. With contributors from all over the globe, our 2020 Young Writers Contest Winners, and our Featured Writer Martín Espada, Resistance is a powerful statement of our First Amendment Rights. Read Resistance now.

 


Copyright © 2020 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

 

RESISTANCE, DoveTales Literary Journal of the Arts, Is Live

RESISTANCE IS LIVE!

Writing for Peace would like to thank Guest Editor Brad Wetzler, all our contributors, our Young Writers, and  Featured Writer Martín Espada for sharing their powerful work with us. The print book will be available for purchase later this month. Until then, we hope all our readers and writers for peace will find hope, solace and inspiration in this online journal.

In reading this workfrom all over the worldI was left with two powerful messages: We are not alone. And together, we are strong.

We shall overcome. Keep the faith and Keep Writing.

Carmel Mawle
DoveTales Editor-in-Chief


Copyright © 2020 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

RESISTANCE Goes Up Tomorrow, and Read Three Contest Finalists Now

RESISTANCE

Our 2020 Summer DoveTales launches at 12 noon Mountain Time. Guest Edited by Brad Wetzler, the RESISTANCE Issue is an exercise in First Amendment Rights. Check in tomorrow to immerse yourself in powerful work from writers, artists and photographers from all over the world, the Young Writers Contest Winners, and our Featured Writer, Martín Espada. This journal is a fearless roar for Democracy and Human Rights.

Young Writers Contest Finalists

This month we have been publishing the finalists from our Young Writers Contest. We received hundreds of wonderful entries, and these writers rose to the top. Congratulations to all our finalists!

Real Beloved, by Karen Umeora

Papa had always placed his hopes in Octavia. She had a strange type of elegance and moved as if gliding on ice.

Read Karen Umeora’s story in full here.

Thunder Over Warsaw, by Adler Schultz

“David,” my mother cries with tears of glittering white,
“Take your sister and run.”

Read Adler Schultz’s poem in full here.

The Flower of Egypt, by Seohyun Yoon

“Flower,” said a young, rather skinny, large-eyed boy in an Arabic accent. As I hopped on the tour carriage, he held out a red flower.

Read Seohyun Yoon’s essay in full here.


Copyright © 2020 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.