Tag Archives: Juniper Moon

Octavio Quintanilla Joins Sunday Live with Juniper Moon

Octavio Quintanilla

Octavio Quintanilla is the author of the poetry collection, If I Go Missing (Slough Press, 2014) and served as the 2018-2020 Poet Laureate of San Antonio, TX.  His poetry, fiction, translations, and photography have appeared, or are forthcoming, in journals such as Salamander, RHINO, Alaska Quarterly Review, Pilgrimage, Green Mountains Review, Southwestern American Literature, The Texas Observer, Existere: A Journal of Art & Literature, and elsewhere. His Frontextos (visual poems) have been published in Poetry Northwest, Borderlands: Texas Poetry Review, Midway Journal, Gold Wake Live, Newfound, Chachalaca Review, Chair Poetry Evenings, Red Wedge, The Museum of Americana, About Place Journal, The American Journal of Poetry, The Windward Review, Tapestry, Twisted Vine Literary Arts Journal, & The Langdon Review of the Arts in Texas.   

Octavio’s visual work has been exhibited at the Southwest School of Art, Presa House Gallery, Equinox Gallery, The University of Texas—Rio Grande Valley (Brownsville Campus), the Weslaco Museum, Aanna Reyes Gallery, Our Lady of the Lake University, AllState Almaguer art space in Mission, TX, El Centro Cultural Hispano de San Marcos, The Walker’s Gallery in San Marcos, TX, and in the Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center / Black Box Theater in Austin, TX.  He holds a Ph.D. from the University of North Texas and is the regional editor for Texas Books in Review and poetry editor for The Journal of Latina Critical Feminism & for Voices de la Luna: A Quarterly Literature & Arts Magazine.  Octavio teaches Literature and Creative Writing in the M.A./M.F.A. program at Our Lady of the Lake University in San Antonio, Texas.  

 

Website: octavioquintanilla.com 

Instagram: @writeroctavioquintanilla 

Twitter: @OctQuintanilla 

 

 

 

 

Join Sunday LIVE Reading Zoom Meeting at:
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Meeting ID: 875 2664 6096   Passcode: 757763

Michael Simms Joins Sunday Live with Juniper Moon

Michael Simms, Writer and Editor

Michael Simms has been active in politics and poetry for over 40 years as a writer, teacher, editor, and community activist. He is the founder of Autumn House Press, a nonprofit publisher of books of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction and the founder of Vox Populi, an online gazette for poetry, politics and nature. He’s also the author of four collections of poetry and a college textbook about poetry — and the lead editor of over 100 published books. Simms has won a number of awards and fellowships, including a Certificate of Recognition in 2011 from the Pennsylvania State Legislature for his contribution to the arts. Simms has an MFA from the University of Iowa and a Certificate in Plant-based Nutrition from Cornell University. Simms is a childhood sexual abuse survivor, a person with autism who did not learn to speak until he was five years old, and a recovering alcoholic and drug addict with 35 years of sobriety. He lives with his wife Eva, a psychologist, in the historic Mount Washington neighborhood overlooking the city of Pittsburgh. Simms’ most recent collection of poems is American Ash.

 

 

Join Sunday LIVE Reading Zoom Meeting at:
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Meeting ID: 875 2664 6096   Passcode: 757763

CMarie Fuhrman Joins Sunday Live with Juniper Moon

CMarie Fuhrman, poet, editor, and essayist

CMarie Fuhrman is the author of Camped Beneath the Dam: Poems (Floodgate 2020) and co-editor of Native Voices (Tupelo 2019). She has published poetry and nonfiction in multiple journals including Emergence Magazine, Yellow Medicine Review, Cutthroat a Journal of the Arts, Whitefish Review, Broadsided Press, Taos  International Journal of Poetry and Art, as well as several anthologies.  CMarie is a regular columnist for the Inlander, the Translations Editor for Broadsided Press, Non Fiction Editor for High Desert Journal, and Director of the Elk River Writers Conference.  She resides in the mountains of West Central Idaho.

Join Sunday LIVE Reading Zoom Meeting at:
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Meeting ID: 875 2664 6096   Passcode: 757763


Copyright © 2021 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 

Tina Schumann Joins Sunday Live with Juniper Moon

Tina Schumann is a Pushcart nominated poet and the author of three poetry collections, Praising the Paradox (Red Hen Press, 2019) which was a finalist in the National Poetry Series, Four Way Books Intro Prize, and the Julie Suk Award, Requiem. A Patrimony of Fugues (Diode Editions, 2017) which won the Diode Editions Chapbook Competition and As If (Parlor City Press, 2010) which was awarded the Stephen Dunn Poetry Prize. She is editor of the IPPY-award winning anthology Two Countries. U.S. Daughters and Sons of Immigrant Parents (Red Hen, 2017). Schumann’s work received the 2009 American Poet Prize from The American Poetry Journal, finalist status in the Terrain.org annual poetry contest, as well as honorable mentions in The Atlantic and Crab Creek Review. She is a poetry editor with Wandering Aengus Press, and a graduate of the Rainier Writing Workshop. Her poems have appeared widely in publications and anthologies since 1999, including The American Journal of Poetry, Ascent, Cimarron Review, Michigan Quarterly Review, The Midwest Quarterly, Nimrod, Parabola, Palabra, Poetry Daily, Poemeleon, Rattle, Verse Daily, and read on NPR’s The Writer’s Almanac. www.tinaschumann.com

Zoya Ahmed Joins Sunday Live with Juniper Moon

Zoya Ahmed is the Sonoma County Poet Laureate. She was not only a 2019 California Poetry Out Loud finalist, but she won the 2019 California’s Poetry Ourselves competition with her original poem “A Concerto of Spice”. With her passion for social justice, she also directed and performed in the 2020 Martin Luther King Jr. Assembly at Maria Carrillo High School. Ahmed attempts to embrace her rich South Asian ancestorhood, and confront the minutiae of privilege and power, microaggressions, and the facade of the American Dream. She hopes that her poems give all those who are silenced, a voice.

Join Sunday LIVE Reading Zoom Meeting at:
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Meeting ID: 875 2664 6096   Passcode: 757763


Copyright © 2021 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

Noah Davis Joins Sunday Live with Juniper Moon

Noah Davis grew up in Tipton, Pennsylvania, and writes about the Allegheny Front. Davis’ manuscript Of This River was selected by George Ella Lyon for the 2019 Wheelbarrow Emerging Poet Book Prize from Michigan State University’s Center for Poetry, and his poems and prose have appeared in The Sun, Best New Poets, Orion, North American Review, River Teeth, Sou’wester, and Chautauqua among others. His work has been nominated for the Pushcart Prize by Poet Lore and Natural Bridge, and he has been awarded a Katharine Bakeless Nason Fellowship at the Bread Loaf Writers Conference and the 2018 Jean Ritchie Appalachian Literature Fellowship from Lincoln Memorial University. Davis earned an MFA from Indiana University and now lives with his wife, Nikea, in Missoula, Montana.

Join Sunday LIVE Reading Zoom Meeting at:
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Meeting ID: 875 2664 6096   Passcode: 757763


Copyright © 2021 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

 

 

Lia Purpura Joins Sunday Live with Juniper Moon

Lia Purpura, the award winning essayist, poet, and translator, joins Sunday Live. If we’re lucky, we’ll hear some of her newest work–poems from It Shouldn’t Have Been Beautiful (Penguin) and essays from All the Fierce Tethers (Sarabande Books).

Her awards include Guggenheim, NEA, and Fulbright Fellowships, as well as four Pushcart Prizes, the Associated Writing Programs Award in Nonfiction, and others.  Her work appears in The New Yorker, The New Republic, Orion, The Paris Review, The Georgia Review, Agni, Emergence, and elsewhere. She lives in Baltimore, MD, where she is Writer in Residence at The University of Maryland, Baltimore County. She has taught in the Rainier Writing Workshop’s MFA program, at Breadloaf Writers Conference, The University of Iowa’s Nonfiction MFA program and at conferences, workshops, and graduate programs throughout the country.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Join Sunday LIVE Reading Zoom Meeting at:
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Meeting ID: 875 2664 6096   Passcode: 757763


Copyright © 2021 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

Forgiveness Does Not Preclude Accountability, and Lia Purpura Joins Sunday LIVE

Forgiveness Does Not Preclude Accountability

By Carmel Mawle

“Thoughts and Prayers.”

On the surface, these words may seem heartfelt and well-meaning. But context is everything. “Thoughts and Prayers” spoken vapidly by our representatives in response to mass shootings becomes worse than meaningless. The words become tantamount to “I want to seem caring, but not endanger my funding from the NRA.”

“Unity and Forgiveness.”

Who could oppose “unity and forgiveness?” Here again, it’s all about context. After years of divisive rhetoric, voter suppression, and then (after losing the presidency and control of the Senate) encouraging an armed insurrection to overturn a democratic election, we have to ask why these criminals are now calling on “unity and forgiveness.” Of course, they are appealing to those of us who believe and work toward those values in hopes that they will not face the consequences of their traitorous actions. 

I don’t believe their expropriated words are completely meaningless. “Unity and Forgiveness” is a way forward out of the darkness of these last four years. But before forgiveness there must be accountability. Our president and every representative who perpetuated the lies that encouraged the deadly attack on our United States Capitol must be held accountable. Every news (or entertainment) agency and social media that carried these lies and incendiary language must be held accountable. The police who aided the terrorists, and of course everyone of the terrorists who breached the building should be held accountable. Their prison terms should reflect the damage they have inflicted on our democracy.

One line of thinking about forgiveness is that the guilty party must first repent and ask our forgiveness. And it’s true that does make it easier to forgive. That said, I’m not sure what the odds are that people under the influence of our unrepentant president will ever come to that point.

I’m not an expert on forgiveness, but I’ve found something that usually works for me. It’s more along the lines of “Forgive them, for they know not what they do.” To loosely paraphrase MIT Professor Noam Chomsky, people who have all the facts will generally make the right decision. I believe the majority of people who marched on our capitol were deluded. They believed they were acting as patriots to “stop the steal.” They truly believe that immigrants and people of color are going to destroy the “America” they are uniquely entitled to. For that, I can pity and, in a sense, forgive them. They are the products of a concerted effort to spread lies for financial gain. They know not what they do. I hope they’ll have enough time in prison to see the error of their ways.

For those who knowingly perpetuate those delusions, I have a harder time with forgiveness. Still, I believe that the desire to hoard wealth, no matter who it injures, is another kind of delusion. It is a sickness. And when I think of it in those terms, I find some level of compassion for them. Yes, even forgiveness. Which is not to say that I will not be relieved to see every one of them behind bars. I doubt that they care whether we forgive them or not. Their primary concern is that they won’t face any consequences for their acts of sedition. But for me, for those of us who hope to regain confidence in our democracy, for our own peace of mind, I believe finding a glimmer of forgiveness will help us heal.

Let’s look forward to the new administration and do what needs to be done to find internal balance and peace. Forgiveness is not for those who have injured us, it is for us. Let’s begin the healing process and prepare ourselves for the work that lies ahead. For there will be much. 

Carmel Mawle founded Writing for Peace ten years ago with the idea that creative writing can develop greater empathy and contribute to a more peaceful world. She serves as president of the Board of Directors and writes from her home in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado.

Writing for Peace Welcomes Lia Purpura to Sunday LIVE

Join host Juniper Moon when she welcomes essayist, poet, and translator Lia Purpura to our Sunday LIVE Reading. This Sunday, January 17th at 8pm ET.

Lia Purpura, the award winning essayist, poet, and translator, joins Sunday Live. If we’re lucky, we’ll hear some of her newest work–poems from It Shouldn’t Have Been Beautiful (Penguin) and essays from All the Fierce Tethers (Sarabande Books).

Her awards include Guggenheim, NEA, and Fulbright Fellowships, as well as four Pushcart Prizes, the Associated Writing Programs Award in Nonfiction, and others.  Her work appears in The New Yorker, The New Republic, Orion, The Paris Review, The Georgia Review, Agni, Emergence, and elsewhere. She lives in Baltimore, MD, where she is Writer in Residence at The University of Maryland, Baltimore County. She has taught in the Rainier Writing Workshop’s MFA program, at Breadloaf Writers Conference, The University of Iowa’s Nonfiction MFA program and at conferences, workshops, and graduate programs throughout the country.

Join Sunday LIVE Reading Zoom Meeting at:
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/87526646096?pwd=aVJTK0pCKzZJUE5QQ28zcU8zREZ3Zz09

Meeting ID: 875 2664 6096   Passcode: 757763


Copyright © 2021 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

 

 

Derek Sheffield joins Sunday LIVE with Host Juniper Moon

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ten years ago, Writing for Peace began with an idea about the power of creative writing to spark empathy in the minds of both the reader and the writer. We challenged young writers to harness that power, and then began collecting work from writers all over the world in our literary journal, DoveTales. We’re celebrating during the month of January with 50% off all our books (while supplies last). Use the Promotion code, YEAR10.

Tonight, producer Juniper Moon welcomes poet Derek Sheffield to our second Sunday LIVE of the New Year. “I’m looking forward to hearing Derek read from his new book Not for Luck and catch up on what creative adventures are on the horizon,” says Juniper.

Derek Sheffield’s collection, Not for Luck, was selected by Mark Doty for the Wheelbarrow Books Poetry Prize. His other books include Through the Second Skin, finalist for the Washington State Book Award, and Dear America: Letters of Hope, Habitat, Defiance, and Democracy, which he coedited with Simmons Buntin and Elizabeth Dodd. He lives on the eastern slopes of the Cascades in Washington and is the poetry editor

 

 

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Don’t Miss Derek Sheffield Tonight On Sunday LIVE

This Sunday, January 10th, at 8pm ET, producer Juniper Moon welcomes poet Derek Sheffield to Sunday LIVE. Invite your friends and join us for some great conversation and inspiration!

Derek Sheffield will be reading from Not for Luck this evening, a collection that reflects simple humanity as one attuned with particularized attention, above and below the surface level tension of a day and a river. Come join us to hear how this attention resonates off the page and reflects one who cares about the steps he’s taking through the world, whether the speaker in the poem or the poet. It’s going to be fabulous.

Derek Sheffield’s collection, Not for Luck, was selected by Mark Doty for the Wheelbarrow Books Poetry Prize. His other books include Through the Second Skin, finalist for the Washington State Book Award, and Dear America: Letters of Hope, Habitat, Defiance, and Democracy, which he coedited with Simmons Buntin and Elizabeth Dodd. He lives on the eastern slopes of the Cascades in Washington and is the poetry editor of Terrain.orgwww.dereksheffield.com

Join Zoom Meeting with Derek Sheffield
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Meeting ID: 847 2680 7686    Passcode: 137077


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