Lyla June Johnston

Lyla June Johnston, Writing fr Peace Young AdviserLyla June Johnston, Young Adviser

Writing for peace means: Praying before each line is written that the Great Spirit’s message comes through. The root word of genius is, ‘genie,’ or spirit. And so the true genius does not take credit for her/his work. Rather s/he celebrates the fact they they were able to move out of the way enough for Spirit’s masterpiece to flow through them. To allow the essence of love to breath and speak through us, this is writing for peace. It is to know that even if this poem brightens just one person’s day, then it was all worth it. To write for peace is to serve humanity and in doing so strengthen our own capacity to love. When we tap into this explosive force of compassion, this is when the muse can truly work through us and make each word a prayer for all things.

~Lyla June Johnston, Writing for Peace Young Adviser

Lyla June Johnston, Writing for Peace Young AdviserLyla June Johnston

Lyla June Johnston was raised in Taos, New Mexico and is a descendent of Diné (Navajo) and Tsétsêhéstâhese (Cheyenne) lineages. Her personal mission in life is to grow closer to Creator by learning how to love deeper. This prayer has taken her on many journeys and materializes in diverse ways.

She is a student of global cycles of violence that eventually gave rise to The Native American Holocaust and the destruction of many cyclic relationships between human beings and nature. This exploration birthed her passion for revitalizing spiritual relationships with Mother Earth and cultivating spaces for forgiveness and reconciliation to occur between cultural groups. She is a co-founder of The Taos Peace and Reconciliation Council, which works to heal intergenerational trauma and ethnic division in the northern New Mexico. She is a walker within the Nihigaal Bee Iiná Movement, a 1,000-mile prayer walk through Diné Tah (the Navajo homeland) that is exposing the exploitation of Diné land and people by uranium, coal, oil and gas industries. She is the lead organizer of the Black Hill Unity Concert which gathers native and nonnative musicians to pray for the return of guardianship of the Black Hills to the Lakota, Nakota and Dakota nations. She is the also the founder of Regeneration Festival, an annual celebration of children that occurs in 13 countries around the world every September.

In 2012, she graduated with honors from Stanford University with a degree in Environmental Anthropology. During her time there she wrote the award winning papers: Nature and the Supernatural: The Role of Culture and Spirituality in Sustaining Primate Populations in Manu National Park, Peru and Chonos Pom: Ethnic Endemism Among the Winnemem Wintu and the Cultural Impacts of Enlarging Shasta Reservoir. She is a musician, public speaker and internationally recognized performance poet. Lyla June ultimately attributes any achievements to Creator who gave her the tools and resources she uses to serve humanity.

She currently lives in Diné Tah, the Navajo ancestral homeland which spans what is now called New Mexico, Colorado, Utah and Arizona. She spends her free time learning her engendered mother tongue, planting corn, beans and squash and spending time with elders who retain traditional spiritual and ecological knowledge.

Links:

The Beautiful, A Writing for Peace Post, by Lyla June Johnston

Lyla June Johnston – Spoken word, Dawn

www.regeneration-festival.com

www.soundcloud.com/lylajune

 

Copyright © 2013 Writing for Peace. All rights reserved.

9 Responses to Lyla June Johnston

  1. Sarah j says:

    Hi Lyla.

    I found your site as my daughter is also named Lyla Johnston and we were google names. Your writing is beautiful and she thinks you are “pretty cool”. She is 5.

    I just wanted to share that with you!

    K

  2. Stephanie Gutz says:

    Lyla,
    This is beautiful. You inspire me.
    Thank you,

  3. Miranda Key says:

    Young woman, I’m so glad the Creator has called you forth …and you listened. Thank you for spreading Peace and Compassion.

  4. Lyla, My husband and I are moved by the prayer on FB. We would like the website to make a donation to the water protectors legal defense.

  5. Tamera Trexler says:

    Hello Lyla June-
    You were introduced to me for the first time today, inauguration day, by your song
    ‘Nations Rise’ via an email from the Center for Biological Diversity. I have played your song over and over all morning. It brings good tears to my eyes on this day. It is my new
    Anthem. I have shared it with Marching Women and many others. It is powerful, sweet,
    Inspiring on many levels. I hear you. I also hope it is okay to say- I am a white woman, of Germanic- Finnish descent living in North Carolina. I participated in a rally/march
    In support of Standing Rock and opposing the pipeline, what it does, what it represents and the forces behind it. Thank you for your song and what you do.

  6. Emilie says:

    Thank you from the bottom of my heart for your visit to Winona, MN. Your warrior spirit for love & justice has helped to bring healing and inspiration to our lives. I specifically appreciate your well chosen words and your bringing them to full voice.

    • Arthur Rodriguez says:

      Hi Lyla-
      Thank you for your work with your musical talents. It is really inspiring to see a sister very motivated in uplifting our native youth. I saw you and supaman share at the Indigenous Resistance Art exhibit in Los Angeles a few months back.

  7. Eric Gilbert says:

    Hi, Lyla! I work as a writer on https://thesispanda.com and don’t have time for other activities. But your life inspire me do something else. Maybe I will change my mind if I will read more articles about people like you.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *