With Ilaria and Francesca in Piacenza

habitation

With Ilaria and Francesca in Piacenza

By Sam Hamill

The years can be brutal––yesterday
a torrent, today just a drizzle. I sat
in the sidewalk café sipping cappuccino,
watching the morning’s passersby. The girls
found me amusing, “like a grampa,” they laughed,
“grizzled old poet against the war,”
who creaked down cobblestone streets in search
of ice cream or granita, or a newspaper.

The girls I knew at such a tender age
wanted no part of me. And now my daughter
could, indeed, be their mother. They are beautiful
and intelligent, and happy to be kind
to the foreign visitor, practicing their English.
All of their joys and heartaches will rise
in time like summer storms, but today
they are laughing, teasing, laughing as only
girls can laugh, and the sun is burning off the clouds
as Plaza Duomo fills with noisy people.

Pigeons coo in the bell tower above the cage,
for sinners like me, that swings in the morning breeze.
I tell the girls, “I sentenced a couple of writers
to that cage last night, kvetching with friends
over pizza and wine at Pasquale’s.” Down here
in sweet samsara, the girls and I get a laugh,
and the cobblestones glisten and the air grows thick
and sweet as honey. “Buon giorno,
buon giorno,” as happy people pass. Cappuccino
finished, I suggest a stroll and put on dark glasses
so Francesca and Ilaria won’t notice
a tear in an old man’s eye.

From HABITATION, Collected poems by Sam Hamill, published by Lost Horse Press.

About Writing for Peace Adviser Sam Hamill

Sam Hamill, black background 1Sam Hamill was born in 1943 and grew up on a Utah farm. He is Founding Editor of Copper Canyon Press and served as Editor there for thirty-two years. He taught in artist-in-residency programs in schools and prisons and worked with Domestic Violence programs. He directed the Port Townsend Writers Conference for nine years, and in 2003, founded Poets Against the War. He is the author of more than forty books, including celebrated translations from ancient Chinese, Japanese, Greek and Latin.

For more information about Sam Hamill and his work, visit his page, here.

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Writing for Peace News

DoveTales Reprinted and Replaced

2016 DoveTales Front cover ImageDoveTales readers noticed a problem with the color images in some of our most recent  Family and Cultural Identity books. Our printer, McNaughton & Gunn, a company with a reputation for quality and attention to detail, insisted on making it right. We appreciate their integrity in this matter, as well as the opportunity to correct the little typos and errors on our end that were found after the first printing. The new books have arrived and they are perfectly beautiful. Shipping will begin in the next week, first to those who have been waiting for book orders, and then to our contributors and readers who purchased the book when it first came out. Contributor discounts will be extended through July . Thank you, friends, for your patience and support through this process, and thank you to McNaughton & Gunn for standing behind their product.

Meet Our 2016 Young Writers

Writing for Peace dreamer2016 Young Writers Contest winner and finalist profiles are beginning to appear on our website. Learn more about these accomplished young writers here.

Writing for Peace challenges young writers (ages 13–19) to expand their empathy skills by researching an unfamiliar culture and writing from the point-of-view of a character within that new world, while exploring social, political, and environmental pressures, and universal themes. There is no fee for participation. The 2017 contest will open on September 1st, 2016. Interested school representatives and teachers can contact us at editor@writingforpeace.org for information, bookmarks, and a DoveTales ebook at no charge.

Recommended Reading From Adviser Dr. Margaret Flowers:

Dr. Margaret Flowers, Writing for Peace Adviser“The government of President Park Geun-hye is using the National Security Law in an extreme way to ban protests and arrest activists. For example, simply speaking positively about North Korea is a crime punishable with seven years in prison.”

Newsletter: Free Prisoners Of Conscience In South Korea

 

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